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Bible Cities

Ancient Trans-Jordan - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region known as Trans-Jordan in the land of ancient Israel. The Trans-Jordan region of Israel was very fertile land that was well watered by the Yarmuk and Jabbok rivers. The hillsides were known for having flocks of sheep, goats, and roaming herds of cattle. The Trans-Jordan region overlapped with the district of Decapolis, so both terms refer to the same general location on the northeastern part of Israel.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/trans-jordan.html

Ancient Tyre - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the cities known as Tyre and Sidon in the land of Phoenicia near ancient Israel.

The Bible says that when Jesus travelled to the region of Tyre and Sidon, a Canaanite woman came to him and begged him to save her daughter from a demon. The woman pleaded and pleaded with Jesus until Jesus turned to her and said, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed at that very moment.

Jesus also referred to Tyre and Sidon when he was addressing the cities of Israel: Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus performed many miracles in these cities but they still did not believe he was the Son of God. Jesus said if he had done the same miracles in Tyre and Sidon they would have repented of their sins and believed in him! That statement would have really gotten their attention, because they believed that the Messiah would only be for the Jewish people not the Phoenicians or any other people. Thankfully for you and me, Jesus came and died for everyone!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/tyre.html

Ancient Sidon - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the cities known as Tyre and Sidon in the land of Phoenicia near ancient Israel.

The Bible says that when Jesus travelled to the region of Tyre and Sidon, a Canaanite woman came to him and begged him to save her daughter from a demon. The woman pleaded and pleaded with Jesus until Jesus turned to her and said, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed at that very moment.

Jesus also referred to Tyre and Sidon when he was addressing the cities of Israel: Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus performed many miracles in these cities but they still did not believe he was the Son of God. Jesus said if he had done the same miracles in Tyre and Sidon they would have repented of their sins and believed in him! That statement would have really gotten their attention, because they believed that the Messiah would only be for the Jewish people not the Phoenicians or any other people. Thankfully for you and me, Jesus came and died for everyone!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/sidon.html

Ancient Sidon - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the cities known as Tyre and Sidon in the land of Phoenicia near ancient Israel.

The Bible says that when Jesus travelled to the region of Tyre and Sidon, a Canaanite woman came to him and begged him to save her daughter from a demon. The woman pleaded and pleaded with Jesus until Jesus turned to her and said, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed at that very moment.

Jesus also referred to Tyre and Sidon when he was addressing the cities of Israel: Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus performed many miracles in these cities but they still did not believe he was the Son of God. Jesus said if he had done the same miracles in Tyre and Sidon they would have repented of their sins and believed in him! That statement would have really gotten their attention, because they believed that the Messiah would only be for the Jewish people not the Phoenicians or any other people. Thankfully for you and me, Jesus came and died for everyone!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/tyre-and-sidon.html

Ancient Sidon - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the cities known as Tyre and Sidon in the land of Phoenicia near ancient Israel.

The Bible says that when Jesus travelled to the region of Tyre and Sidon, a Canaanite woman came to him and begged him to save her daughter from a demon. The woman pleaded and pleaded with Jesus until Jesus turned to her and said, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed at that very moment.

Jesus also referred to Tyre and Sidon when he was addressing the cities of Israel: Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus performed many miracles in these cities but they still did not believe he was the Son of God. Jesus said if he had done the same miracles in Tyre and Sidon they would have repented of their sins and believed in him! That statement would have really gotten their attention, because they believed that the Messiah would only be for the Jewish people not the Phoenicians or any other people. Thankfully for you and me, Jesus came and died for everyone!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/tyre-and-sidon.html

Ancient Tyre - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the cities known as Tyre and Sidon in the land of Phoenicia near ancient Israel.

The Bible says that when Jesus travelled to the region of Tyre and Sidon, a Canaanite woman came to him and begged him to save her daughter from a demon. The woman pleaded and pleaded with Jesus until Jesus turned to her and said, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed at that very moment.

Jesus also referred to Tyre and Sidon when he was addressing the cities of Israel: Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus performed many miracles in these cities but they still did not believe he was the Son of God. Jesus said if he had done the same miracles in Tyre and Sidon they would have repented of their sins and believed in him! That statement would have really gotten their attention, because they believed that the Messiah would only be for the Jewish people not the Phoenicians or any other people. Thankfully for you and me, Jesus came and died for everyone!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/tyre-and-sidon.html

Ancient Lake of Gennesaret - Map of New Testament Israel

GEN-NES`A-RET (garden of the prince),
i. A fertile, crescent shaped plain on the west shore of the lake of Gennesaret, about three miles long and one wide.
ii. The Lake of Gennesaret is called the "Sea of Chinnereth" in the Old Testament, from the town of Chinnereth, or Cinneroth, which stood on its shores. Num. 34:11.
iii. Called "Sea of Galilee" in the New Testament from the country west of it. It is thirteen miles long and six wide. It is 700 feet below the bed of the ocean, and is surrounded with bold shores. It might be called an enlargement of the river Jordan. The country around it was densely populated and it was the scene of many notable instances in the life of Christ.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/lake-of-gennesaret.html

Ancient Lebanon Mountains - Map of New Testament Israel

LEB`A-NON (white, incense), The mountains on the north of Israel, Deut. 1:7; 11:24. There are two parallel ranges running northeast to southwest for about ninety miles, between which is Coele (hollow) Syria. The western range is Libanus or Lebanon proper; the eastern range is the Anti- Libanus. Average height 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Cliffs are white limestone, peaks covered with snow, hence the name signifying "white." Frequently alluded to in scriptures, Is. 10:34 ; Ps. 72:16 ; Jer. 22:23. In Song of Sol. 7:4, Mt. Hermon is alluded to.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mount-lebanon.html

Ancient Lydda - Map of New Testament Israel

LYD`DA, Greek form of Lud or Lod. It stands in the plain of Sharon nine miles from Joppa, and is called Lidd or Ludd. It acquired great importance during the Crusades as the native place of St. George, patron saint of England. Acts 9:33-34.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/lydda.html

Ancient Magdala - Map of New Testament Israel

MAG`DA-LA (tower, greatness), A village on the west shore of the Sea of Galilee near Tiberias, now Medjel, Matt 15:39.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/magdala.html

Ancient Mediterranean Sea - Map of New Testament Israel

Mare Internum (Mare Nostrum). Latin names for Mediterranean (Biblical name "Great Sea"). Num. 34:6-7; Josh. 1:4; 9:1; 15:12; 23:4; Ezek. 47:10; 48:28

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mediterranean-sea.html

Ancient Megiddo - Map of New Testament Israel

ME-GID`DO (precious fruit), A town of Manasseh on southern limit of the plain of Esdraelon, Josh. 12:21. Scene of the great conflict between Sisera and Barak and of Josiah`s death, Judg. 4:13 ; 2 Kings 23:29; 2 Chron, 35:22.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/megiddo.html

Ancient Michmash - Map of New Testament Israel

MICH`MASH (who strikes), A town of Benjamin about seven miles north of Jerusalem. Noted in wars with Philistia, 1 Sam. 13; 14. Also referred to as MICH`MAS in Ezra 2:27.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/michmash.html

Ancient Nain - Map of New Testament Israel

NA`IN (beauty, dwelling). Now Nein, is a small village of Galilee, near Mt. Tabor. Christ raised from death the widow`s son near its gate, Luke 7:12.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/nain.html

Ancient Nazareth - Map of New Testament Israel

NAZ`A-RETH (separated, sanctified). First mentioned in Matt, 2:23. A town of Galilee among the hills north of the plain of Esdraelon, and about midway between the Jordan and the Mediterranean Sea. It was the residence of Jesus and called his city, Luke 1:26; 4:16, 29. Called En-Nazirah, a neat village of 3000 or 4000 inhabitants.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/nazareth.html

Ancient Aenon - Kids` Bible maps

This map shows the location of Aenon in the land of Israel. The word aenon means "springs" which is a fitting name for this area where John the Baptist was recorded baptizing in the Bible. In Scripture it is referred to as the place "near to Salim."

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/aenon.html

Ancient Bethany - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the location of Bethany in the land of Israel. The town of Bethany was located about two miles east of Jerusalem on the road toward the city of Jericho. Bethany is where the man named Lazarus lived, and he was friends with Jesus. When Lazarus was sick his sisters sent for Jesus to come and heal him, but Jesus had a different plan!

After several more days, Jesus and his disciples learned that Lazarus had died. At that time they packed up their things and traveled to Bethany. After Lazarus had been dead for four days, Jesus called to him from outside of the tomb saying, "Lazarus, come forth!" And Lazarus was alive again!

Simon the leper also lived in Bethany, and it was at Simon`s house that a woman came and poured expensive perfume on Jesus` head.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/bethany.html

Ancient Bethlehem - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the city of Bethlehem where Jesus was born in a manger. The reason it is important that Jesus was born in Bethlehem is because in Micah 5:2 it was prophesied that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem. It`s also important to know that Bethlehem was also the birthplace of King David. And it was prophesied that the Messiah would come from David`s family. Jesus fulfilled both prophesies!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/bethlehem.html

Ancient Bethphage - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the location of Bethphage in the land of Israel. The town of Bethphage was on the Mount of Olives very close to the town of Bethany and the capital city of Jerusalem.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/bethphage.html

Ancient Bethsaida - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the location of Bethsaida in the land of Israel. There were two towns named Bethsaida on the north part of the Sea of Galilee. On this map is Bethsaida-Julias which is the general location that many believe is where Jesus fed the 5,000 people with just five loaves of bread and two fish. Bethsaida is also the town where the people brought a blind man to Jesus and he healed his eyes so he could see!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/bethsaida.html

Ancient Caesarea - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the city known as Caesarea in the land of ancient Israel. Caesarea was located along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Herod the Great built the city up and made it very strong and he named it Caesarea in honor of Augustus Caesar. Philip the evangelist lived here, and so did Cornelius the Roman centurion. Caesarea was roughly 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem and was frequently visited on the road from Tyre to the land of Egypt.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/caesarea.html

Ancient Cana - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the city of Cana where Jesus performed his first miracle: turning water into wine.

Jesus, his mother Mary, and the disciples were all invited to a wedding in the town of Cana. Cana is a few miles north of the town of Nazareth in the region of Galilee. While celebrating, the hosting family ran out of wine so Jesus told their servants to fill six very large stone pots all the way up with water. Then Jesus told them to take some of it out to the host of the party; when they did the man drank the water, but it wasn`t water anymore it was turned into wine!

Isn`t it great that the very first miracle of Jesus recorded in the Bible was for a celebration of marriage? Marriage is beautiful and worthy of celebrating! Now you know where the town of Cana is, where Jesus turned water into wine.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/cana.html

Ancient Decapolis - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region known as Decapolis in the land of ancient Israel. The region of Decapolis was mentioned three times in the Bible. It contained ten cities that were rebuilt and given special treatment under the Roman Empire. The original 10 cities are believed to be Scythopolis, Hippos, Gadara, Philadelphia, Pella, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, and Raphana. Decapolis was a well populated region during ancient times, but there aren`t many inhabitants there today.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/decapolis.html

Ancient Galilee - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region known as Galilee in the land of ancient Israel. The northern region of Israel called Galilee was mentioned many times in the New Testament. Jesus spent a lot of his time in Galilee, which gave him the nickname "the Galilean." Nazareth was located in the region of Galilee, which is where Jesus grew up and lived for most of his life. Cana is also in the Galilean region and that is where Jesus did his first recorded miracle of turning water into wine!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/galilee.html

Ancient Idumea - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region known as Idumea in the New Testament. The region on the south border of Judea was called Idumea by the Greeks and Romans. It belonged to the Edomites of the Old Testament. The father of Herod the Great Idumean.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/idumea.html

Ancient Jerusalem - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the great city of Jerusalem where Jesus visited the temple as a boy. Many things happened in the city of Jerusalem throughout the Bible. Jerusalem was captured by Nebuchadnezzar in the Old Testament, David established Jerusalem as his capital, Solomon built the temple, and Jesus visited the city many times throughout his life.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/jerusalem.html

Ancient Judea - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region of Judea in the land of ancient Israel. The region of Judea was 55 miles long, from Bethlehem where Jesus was born, down to the city of Beersheba. Almost half of Judea was desert! It was a very dry and barren place in the west, but there were hills and the Jordan river in the east.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/judea.html

Ancient Nabatea - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region of Nabatea in the land of ancient Israel. The region of Nabatea was conquered by the Romans under the rule of Pompey. He restored the cities that were destroyed by the Jews and set up the Decapolis. The region of Nabatea was used by the Romans as a buffer state against the desert tribes and prospered when it officially joined the empire.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/nabatea.html

Ancient Nain - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the town of Nain where Jesus visited brought a widow`s son back to life! The Bible says that Jesus was saddened when he entered the town and saw that a widowed woman`s only son had died. He told her not to cry, then commanded her son to get up--and he did!

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/nain.html

Ancient Samaria - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the region of Samaria in the land of ancient Israel. The region of Samaria was known for its rich agriculture: wheat and barley, grapes and olive vineyards. Jesus passed through the land of Samaria on his way to and from Jerusalem, but most people of that time would have gone around Samaria. The exact boundaries of Samaria are unknown but we know that it went as far as the Jordan river in the east and to the coast of the Mediterranean Sea on the west side."

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/samaria.html

Ancient Sea of Galilee - Kids Bible maps

This map shows the Sea of Galilee where Jesus walked on water! Did you know that 18 of the 33 recorded miracles of Jesus were likely done in the area surrounding the Sea of Galilee? It was common for big storms to hit the the sea really quickly because of the sea`s climate and location. There were many cities surrounding the Sea of Galilee including Capernaum, Tiberias, and Bethsaida.

Link: http://kidsbiblemaps.com/sea-of-galilee.html

Ancient Caesarea - Map of New Testament Israel

CAES-A-RE`A (for Caesar), An important city on the Mediterranean coast of Palestine, and in line ot travel from Tyre to Egypt. Anciently called Strato`s Tower. Built by Herod the Great, and named in honor of Caesar Augustus. Political capital of Palestine. Residence of Philip, Acts viii, 40; and Cornelius, Acts x, xi, 1-18. You can visit the site and see many ruins. Ancient Caesarea was about 70 miles from Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/caesarea.html

Ancient Caesarea Philippi - Map of New Testament Israel

CAES-A-RE`A PHIL-IP`PI, Called by Josephus, Panium, because the god Pan had a sanctuary there. A city at the foot of Mt. Hermon, whence the most eastern branch of the Jordan flows. It marks the northern limits of Christ`s pilgrimage on earth. Built by the tetrach Philip, and named after Tiberius Caesar and himself. Identified with Baal-gad of the Old Testament. Probably the scene of the transfiguration, Matt 16:13 ; Mark 8:27.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/caesarea-philippi-paneas.html

Ancient Aenon - Map of New Testament Israel

AE-NON (springs), A place where John baptized, west of the Jordan, John 3:23.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/aenon.html

Ancient Anathoth - Map of New Testament Israel

AN`A-THOTH (song, poverty), i. See 1 Chron. 7:8, and Neh 10:19. ii. A Levitical city situated in the boundaries of Benjamin four miles north of Jerusalem, Isa. 10:30; Josh, 21:18. Its ruins nave lately been discovered.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/anathoth.html

Ancient Arimathea - Map of New Testament Israel

AR`I-MA-THE`A (lion dead to the Lord), A city of Judea, Luke 23:51 ; Matt, 27:57. Doubtless the Ramah of 1 Sam. 1:1.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/arimathea.html

Ancient Beersheba - Map of New Testament Israel

BE`ER-SHE`BA (well of an oath, or seventh well). One of the oldest places in the southern part of Israel. The spot still identified as Bir es Seba, well of the Lion or seven. The well was dug by Abraham, and his compact with Abimelech celebrated there with an oath ratified by the gift of seven ewe lambs. Hence the name. Gen 21:31-33.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/beersheba.html

Ancient Damascus - Map of New Testament Israel

DA-MAS`CUS (sack full of blood, similitude of burning), A city of Syria east of Anti-Lebanus, and in the midst of a lovely and fertile plain opening on the Desert. Gen. 14:15 , 15:2 Contiguous region called "Syria of Damascus," 2 Sam. 8:5. Taken by David, 8: 5, 6, and by Jeroboam, 2 Kings 14:28. Afterwards subject to Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Seleucidae and the Romans. In Paul`s time much thronged by Jews. Scene of Paul`s conversion. Acts 9:1-27; 22:1-16. Always a commercial centre, Ezek, 27:18. Called now in the East the "Paradise of the world." Present population, 150,000. Belongs to Turkey. Chief gathering place of pilgrims for Mecca. Damask cloth and Damascus swords are noted. Still a street there called "Straight," as in Acts 9:11.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/damascus.html

Ancient Bethany - Map of New Testament Israel

BETH`A-NY (house of song, or affliction), A village of Israel, on the slope of Olivet, about four miles from Jerusalem, now called Lazarieh, "village of Lazarus," Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/bethany.html

Ancient Bethel - Map of New Testament Israel

BETH-EL (house of God). 1. A city and holy place of central Israel, twelve miles north of Jerusalem. Two accounts of name in Gen, 28:19 ; 35:14-15. But consult Gen. 12:8. Ephraim took it as Bethel, Judg. 1:22-26. Israelites went up to Bethel to ask counsel of God, Judg. 20:18, 26, 31. The ark was there, Judg. 20:26, 28. A holy city, 1 Sam. 7:16. 2. A town in the south of Judah, Josh, 12:6; 1 Sam. 30:27 ; appears elsewhere as Chesil, Bethul, and Bethuel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/bethel.html

Ancient Bethlehem - Map of New Testament Israel

BETH`LE-HEM (house of bread), i. A town of Israel six miles south of Jerusalem. Early called Ephrath and Ephrata, Gen. 35:16-19, Josh. 15:59. Both Ephrata and Bethlehem in Ruth and Samuel. Bethlehem-Judah in Josh, 17:7. The birthplace of David and Christ, Matt 2:1-5 ; Luke 2:4. ii, A town in Zebulon, Josh, 19:15.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/bethlehem.html

Ancient Bethphage - Map of New Testament Israel

BETH`PHA-GE (house of my mouth), A place on the slope of Olivet close to Bethany, Matt 21:1 ; Luke 19:29.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/bethphage.html

Ancient Cana - Map of New Testament Israel

CA`NA (jealousy, possession) A town of Galilee, seven miles north of Nazareth. Scene of Christ`s first miracle, John 2:1-2 ; 4:46. Birth-place of Nathanael, John 21:2.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/cana.html

Ancient Capernaum - Map of New Testament Israel

CA-PER`NA-UM (hamlet of repentance or comfort), Chief city of Galilee on the north-west shore of the sea of Galilee. Christ`s "own city," Matt 4:12-16 ; where he wrought mighty works, 17:23; Chief residence of the Lord and his apostles. The doom pronounced in Matt 11:20-24 has been literally fulfilled.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/capernaum.html

Ancient Carmel - Map of New Testament Israel

CAR`MEL (full of corn), i. A city of Judah on the Mountain of Carmel six miles south-east of Hebron. Nabal`s possession, 1 Sam. 25:2 ; seat of Saul`s trophy, 25:12 ; and Uzziah`s vineyards, 2 Chron. 26:10. ii. The bold promontory which forms the bay of Acre, 1500 feet high, separating Sharon from Esdraelon. Familiar by histories of Elijah and Elisha, Isa. 35:2 ; 33:9 ; 2 Kings 2:25 ; 4:25 ; 1 Kings 18.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mount-carmel.html

Ancient Dead Sea or Salt Sea - Map of New Testament Israel

DEAD SEA, Not so called until the second century. In Old Testament "the Salt Sea," and "Sea of the Plain."

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/dead-sea.html

Ancient Decapolis - Map of New Testament Israel

DE-CAP`0-LIS (ten cities). An illy defined province of Syria and Israel created by the Romans, lying on both sides of the Jordan but principally on the east. The ten cities it contained according to Pliny were: Scythopolis, Hippos, Gadera, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus and Raphana, Matt. 4:25; Mark 5:20; 7:31

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/decapolis.html

Ancient Ebal - Map of New Testament Israel

E`BAL (ancient heaps), i. A son of Joktan (1 Chron. 1:22), also of Shobal (Gen. 35:23). ii. Mount Ebal, on which the cursings of valley and town of Shechem between. Its base is full of caves and sepulchral excavations.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mount-ebal.html

Ancient Emmaus - Map of New Testament Israel

EM`MA-US (people despised), The village of Israel to which the two disciples were going when Christ appeared to them. Luke makes it "three-score furlongs" or seven and a half miles north-west of Jerusalem, Luke 24:13-33. Eusebius makes it Nicopolis.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/emmaus.html

Ancient En-Gedi - Map of New Testament Israel

EN-GE`DI (fountain of the goat), A town of Judah on the western shore of the Dead Sea, Josh 15:62 ; Ezek. 47:10. Originally called Hazazon Tamar on account of its palm- groves, 2 Chron. 20:2 ; Ecclus. 24:14. It is identified by the fountain of Ain Jidy, on an elevation some four hundred feet above the sea, Gen. 14:7 ; 1 Sam. 24:1-4. Its vineyards were celebrated by Solomon, Song of Sol. 1:14

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/en-gedi.html

Ancient Gadara - Map of New Testament Israel

GAD`A-RA (surrounded or walled), Once a strong city east of the Jordan, some seven miles south of the sea of Galilee. Now Um-keis, and ruins plenty. Noted as the scene of the miracles mentioned in Matt. 8:28-34 ; Mark 5:1-20; Luke 8:26-40.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/gadara.html

Ancient Gennesaret - Map of New Testament Israel

GEN-NES`A-RET (garden of the prince), i. A fertile, crescent shaped plain on the west shore of the lake of Gennesaret, about three miles long and one wide.
ii. The Lake of Gennesaret is called the "Sea of Chinnereth" in the Old Testament, from the town of Chinnereth, or Cinneroth, which stood on its shores. Num. 34:11.
iii. Called "Sea of Galilee" in the New Testament from the country west of it. It is thirteen miles long and six wide. It is 700 feet below the bed of the ocean, and is surrounded with bold shores. It might be called an enlargement of the river Jordan. The country around it was densely populated and it was the scene of many notable instances in the life of Christ.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/gennesaret.html

Ancient Gilboa - Map of New Testament Israel

GIL-BO`A (wheel of inquiry), The mountain range on the south east of Esdraelon overlooking Jezreel, 1 Sam. 28:4. Scene of the defeat of Saul and Jonathan, 1 Sam. 31:1 ; 2 Sam. 1:6.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mount-gilboa.html

Ancient Hebron - Map of New Testament Israel

HE`BRON (friendship),
i. Third son of Kohath and uncle of Moses and Aaron, Ex. 6:18 ; Num. 3:19, 27.
ii. In 1 Chron. 2:42 a place is probably meant.
iii. A city of Judah among the mountains twenty miles south of Jerusalem. It was one of the most ancient cities of Canaan, Num. 13:22 ; was known to Abraham, Gen. 13:18. Its original name was Arba, after Arba the father of Anak, progenitor of the Anakim, Judg. 1:10; Josh, 21:11. Now called El-Khulil which is the Arabic name of Abraham. The cave of Machpelah is still to be seen. Present population 5000.
iv. A town in Asher, Josh. 19:28.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/hebron.html

Ancient Hermon - Map of New Testament Israel

HER`MON (lofty, prominent). The most conspicuous and beautiful mountain in Israel. It is the southern point of the Anti-Lebanon range, at the head waters of the Jordan. Called Sirion by Sidonians, Shenir by Amorites, and Sion in Deut. 4:4S. It was the great northern landmark of the Hebrews. Height 10,000 feet, Josh, 11:17; Deut. 3:8.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/mount-hermon.html

Ancient Idumea - Map of New Testament Israel

ID`U-ME`A, Greek name of Edom, Isa. 34:5-6; Matt. 3:8.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/idumea.html

Ancient Jabbok River - Map of New Testament Israel

JAB`BOK (dissipation, wrestling), A stream of Gilead entering the Jordan midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. It constituted the southern boundary of Ammon. Now Zurka. Num. 21:24; Deut. 2:37; Gen. 32:22.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/jabbok-river.html

Ancient Joppa - Map of New Testament Israel

JOP`PA (beauty), A town on the Mediterranean coast of Israel; the seaport of Jerusalem, 1 Kings 5:9 ; 2 Chron. 2:16; Ezra 3:7 ; 2 Kings 14:25. Now Jaffa. It was of Phoenician origin and during the middle ages frequently changed hands by conquest. Now belongs to the Israel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/joppa.html

Ancient Jordan River - Map of New Testament Israel

JOR`DAN (river of judgment, the descender). The chief river of Israel ; rises in range of Anti-Lebanon, flows southwardly expanding into Lakes Merom and Gennesareth, a distance of two hundred miles and empties into the Dead Sea. Its current is rapid, fords are difficult, the valley narrow except opposite Jericho. Volume of water variable, breadth from seventy-five to three hundred feet and depth from three to ten feet. Though lost in the Dead Sea, its valley extends to the Gulf of Arabia. Conspicuous in Bible history from earliest date, Gen. 13:10; Josh, 2:7; Judg. 3:28; 7:24; 12:6 ; 2 Sam. 10:17; Matt, 3:13.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/jordan-river.html

Ancient Jericho - Map of New Testament Israel

JER`I-CHO (his moon, month, or sweet smell). An original city of Canaan in valley of Jordan seven miles from the river, and eighteen miles from Jerusalem. Due west from Gilgal and the place where the river was forded by the Israelites. Destroyed by Joshua and fell to Benjamin, Josh, 16:7 ; 18:21. A curse was pronounced on him who should rebuild it. Josh, 6:26 ; 1 Kings 16:34. Called "the city of Palm trees" in Deut. 34:3 ; Judg. 1:16. The revived Jericho probably occupied a site near to old. It came into great importance, and is frequently mentioned in after history, 2 Kings 2:1-22 ; 25:5 ; Matt, 20:30 ; Mark 10:46.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/jericho.html

Ancient Jerusalem - Map of New Testament Israel

JE-RU`SA-LEM (vision of peace)
If not the Salem of Gen. 14:18, certainly the Jebus of the Old Testament until the time of David when the name Jerusalem was fully adopted. Situated in the southern portion of Benjamin, twenty-four miles from the Jordan and thirtyseven miles from the Mediterranean Sea near the summit of a broad mountain ridge. Partially destroyed at the time of conquest, soon after the death of Joshua, but Jebusite not expelled, Judg. 1:8. Assaulted by David (1 Chron. 12:23-39) and taken B.C. 1046. Rebuilt by him, beautified with palaces, surrounded by walls, and made his capital. In the time of Solomon the temple, pools and gardens were built, fortifications enhanced, and the city was made the most beautiful and renowned city of antiquity.
From Judges to A.D. 100 the city was besieged seventeen times, twice razed to the ground, and twice had its walls levelled. Largest acreage within old walls: 180. Maximum population: 70,000. Captured and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, B.C. 588. Jews returned after seventy years and rebuilt it. Taken by Alexander, of Macedon, B.C. 332. A few years it fell into the hands of Ptolemy of Egypt. B.C. 170 Jerusalem was taken by Antiochus Epiphanes of Syria. B.C. 163, restored to Jews by Maccabees. A.D. 70-71, taken and destroyed by Rome. Jews banished A.D. 135, and city named Aelia Capitolina. Name restored under Constantine. A.D. 613, captured by Persia. A.D. 627, recovered by Greeks. Captured by Omar the Mohammedan, A.D. 637. A.D. 863, taken by Turks. A.D. 1099-1187 was under Christian kings-Crusaders. Since then mostly under Turkish rule until Israel became a nation again in 1948.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/jerusalem.html

Ancient Judea - Map of New Testament Israel

JU-DAE`A, JU-DE`A (land of Judah),
In a general sense the whole of Israel, but more particularly that southern portion which constituted the kingdom of Judah, viz., the allotments of Judah, Benjamin, and parts of Simeon and Dan. Word first used in Dan. 5:13. Became general after the captivity, Ezra 5:8 ; Neh. 11:3 ; Matt, 19:1 ; Mark 10:1. Under Rome it was governed by a procurator.

Link: https://bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/judea.html

Hananiah Scripture - 1 Chronicles 3:21

And the sons of Hananiah; Pelatiah, and Jesaiah: the sons of Rephaiah, the sons of Arnan, the sons of Obadiah, the sons of Shechaniah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/3/

Hananiah Scripture - 1 Chronicles 3:19

And the sons of Pedaiah [were], Zerubbabel, and Shimei: and the sons of Zerubbabel; Meshullam, and Hananiah, and Shelomith their sister:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/3/

Rosetta in Wikipedia

Rosetta (Arabic: ÑÔíÏý Rashid, French: Rosette) is a port city on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. It is located 65 km (40 miles) east of Alexandria, in al-Buhayrah governorate. It was founded around AD 800. With the decline of Alexandria following the Ottoman conquest of Egypt in 1517, Rashid boomed, only to wane in importance after Alexandria's revival. During the 19th century it was a popular British tourist destination, known for its charming Ottoman mansions, citrus groves and cleanliness. The town of Rashid came to be known in the West as Rosette (Rosetta), the name by which it was referred to by the French during Napoleon Bonaparte's campaign in Egypt. It is famous as the site where the "Pierre de Rosette" (Rosetta Stone) was found by French soldiers in 1799.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta

Beersheba in Smith's Bible Dictionary

(well of the oath), the name of one of the old places in Israel which formed the southern limit of the country. There are two accounts of the origin of the name. According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given to Judah, Jos 15:28 and then to Simeon, Jos 19:2; 1Ch 4:28 In the often-quoted "from Dan even unto Beersheba," Jud 20:1 it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as Dan the northern. In the time of Jerome it was still a considerable place, and still retains its ancient name --Bir es-Seba. There are at present on the spot two principal wells and five smaller ones. The two principal wells are on or close to the northern bank of the Wady es-Seba. The larger of the two, which lies to the east, is, according to Dr. Robinson, 12 1/2 feet in diameter, and at the time of his visit (April 12) was 44 1/2 feet to the surface of the water. The masonry which encloses the well extends downward 28 1/2 feet. The other well is 5 feet in diameter, and was 42 feet to the water. The curb-stones around the mouth of both wells are worn into deep grooves by the action of the ropes of so many centures. These wells are in constant use today. The five lesser wells are in a group in the bed of the wady. On some low hills north of the large wells are scattered the foundations and ruins of a town of moderate size.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/B/Be-er-sheba/

Thessalonica in Wikipedia

After the fall of the kingdom of Macedon in 168 BC, Thessalonica became a city of the Roman Republic. It grew to be an important trade-hub located on the Via Egnatia, the Roman road connecting Byzantium (later Constantinople), with Dyrrhachium (now Durres in Albania), and facilitating trade between Europe and Asia. The city became the capital of one of the four Roman districts of Macedonia; it kept its privileges but was ruled by a praetor and had a Roman garrison, while for a short time in the 1st century BC, all the Greek provinces came under Thessalonica (the Latin form of the name). Due to the city's key commercial importance, a spacious harbour was built by the Romans, the famous Burrowed Harbour (Σκαπτός Λιμήν) that accommodated the town's trade up to the eighteenth century; later, with the help of silt deposits from the river Axios, it was reclaimed as land and the port built beyond it. Remnants of the old harbour's docks can be found in the present day under Odos Frangon Street, near the Catholic Church. Thessaloniki's acropolis, located in the northern hills, was built in 55 BC after Thracian raids in the city's outskirts, for security reasons. The city had a Jewish colony, established during the first century, and was to be an early centre of Christianity. On his second missionary journey, Paul of Tarsus, born a Hellenized Israelite, preached in the city's synagogue, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Thessaloniki, and laid the foundations of a church. Other Jews opposed to Paul drove him from the city, and he fled to Veroia. Paul wrote two of his epistles to the Christian community at Thessalonica, the First Epistle to the Thessalonians and the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thessaloniki

Ziklag in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(winding), a place which possesses a special interest from its having been the residence and the private property of David. It is first mentioned in the catalogue of the towns of Judah in Jos 15:31 and occurs, in the same connection among the places which were allotted out of the territory of Judah to Simeon. Jos 19:5 We next encounter it in the possession of the Philistines 1Sa 27:6 when it was, at David's request, bestowed upon him by Achish king of Gath. He resided there for a year and four months. 1Sa 27:6,7; 30:14,26; 1Ch 12:1,20 It was there he received the news of Saul's death. 2Sa 1:1; 4:10 He then relinquished it for Hebron. 2Sa 2:1 Ziklag is finally mentioned as being reinhabited by the people of Judah after their return from captivity. Ne 11:28 The situation of the town is difficult to determine, and we only know for certain that it was in the south country.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/Z/Ziklag/

Ziklag in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a town in the Negeb, or south country of Judah (Josh. 15:31), in the possession of the Philistines when David fled to Gath from Ziph with all his followers. Achish, the king, assigned him Ziklag as his place of residence. There he dwelt for over a year and four months. From this time it pertained to the kings of Judah (1 Sam. 27:6). During his absence with his army to join the Philistine expedition against the Israelites (29:11), it was destroyed by the Amalekites (30:1, 2), whom David, however, pursued and utterly routed, returning all the captives (1 Sam. 30:26-31). Two days after his return from this expedition, David received tidings of the disastrous battle of Gilboa and of the death of Saul (2 Sam. 1:1-16). He now left Ziklag and returned to Hebron, along with his two wives, Ahinoam and Abigail, and his band of 600 men. It has been identified with 'Asluj, a heap of ruins south of Beersheba. Conder, however, identifies it with Khirbet Zuheilikah, ruins found on three hills half a mile apart, some seventeen miles north-west of Beersheba, on the confines of Philistia, Judah, and Amalek.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/Z/Ziklag/

Ziklag in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city in southern Judah, associated with Chesil and Hormah (Joshua 15:31; Joshua 19:5; 1 Chronicles 4:30). Lieut. Conder identifies it with Zehleika or Khirbet Zuheilikah in the middle of the plain N. of Beersheba, 200 miles square, just where the narrative concerning David would lead us to look for it. The ruins are on three small hills, forming an equilateral triangle, almost half a mile apart; among the ruins are several cisterns. Simeon possessed it. Assigned by Achish king of Gath to David, for the Philistines had taken it. Thence David went up against the Geshurites, Gezrites, and Amalekites (1 Samuel 27:8-9; 1 Samuel 30:14; 1 Samuel 30:26), for these tribes occupied the plateau overhanging the Philistine plain to the W. and wady Murreh to the S. He resided there a year and four months; it was there he received daily new accessions of forces (1 Chronicles 12:1-20), and heard of Saul's death (2 Samuel 1:1; 2 Samuel 4:10); thence he went to Hebron (2 Samuel 2:1). Thus Ziklag lay at the confines of Philistia, Judah, and Amalek. Its position probably was in the open country, pastoral and amble, reached from the S. after passing out of wady er Ruheibeh. The term used in 1 Samuel 30:11 is "the field (sadeh) of the Philistines"; sadeh is applied to the country of Amalek (Genesis 14:7). Reoccupied after the Babylonian captivity by the men of Judah (Nehemiah 11:28).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/Z/Ziklag/

Ziklag in Hitchcock's Bible Names

measure pressed down

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/Z/Ziklag/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Chronicles 12:20

As he went to Ziklag, there fell to him of Manasseh, Adnah, and Jozabad, and Jediael, and Michael, and Jozabad, and Elihu, and Zilthai, captains of the thousands that [were] of Manasseh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/12/

Ziklag Scripture - 2 Samuel 4:10

When one told me, saying, Behold, Saul is dead, thinking to have brought good tidings, I took hold of him, and slew him in Ziklag, who [thought] that I would have given him a reward for his tidings:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/4/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Samuel 30:14

We made an invasion [upon] the south of the Cherethites, and upon [the coast] which [belongeth] to Judah, and upon the south of Caleb; and we burned Ziklag with fire.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/30/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Samuel 30:26

And when David came to Ziklag, he sent of the spoil unto the elders of Judah, [even] to his friends, saying, Behold a present for you of the spoil of the enemies of the LORD;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/30/

Ziklag Scripture - 2 Samuel 1:1

Now it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had abode two days in Ziklag;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/1/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Chronicles 12:1

Now these [are] they that came to David to Ziklag, while he yet kept himself close because of Saul the son of Kish: and they [were] among the mighty men, helpers of the war.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/12/

Ziklag Scripture - Nehemiah 11:28

And at Ziklag, and at Mekonah, and in the villages thereof,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Nehemiah/11/

Ziklag Scripture - Joshua 15:31

And Ziklag, and Madmannah, and Sansannah,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Ziklag Scripture - Joshua 19:5

And Ziklag, and Bethmarcaboth, and Hazarsusah,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/19/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Chronicles 4:30

And at Bethuel, and at Hormah, and at Ziklag,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/4/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Samuel 27:6

Then Achish gave him Ziklag that day: wherefore Ziklag pertaineth unto the kings of Judah unto this day.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/27/

Ziklag Scripture - 1 Samuel 30:1

And it came to pass, when David and his men were come to Ziklag on the third day, that the Amalekites had invaded the south, and Ziklag, and smitten Ziklag, and burned it with fire;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/30/

Zoar in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

zo'-ar (tso`ar; the Septuagint usually Segor, Zogora): The name of the city to which Lot escaped from Sodom (Gen 19:20- 23,30), previously mentioned in Gen 13:10; 14:2,8, where its former name is said to have been Bela. In 19:22, its name is said to have been given because of its littleness, which also seems to have accounted for its being spared. The location of Zoar has much to do with that of the cities of the Plain or Valley of Siddim, with which it is always connected. In Dt 34:3, Moses is said to have viewed "the Plain of the valley of Jericho the city of palm trees, unto Zoar," while in Isa 15:5 and Jer 48:4 (where the Septuagint reads unto "Zoar," instead of "her little ones") it is said to be a city of Moab. The traditional location of the place is at the south end of the Dead Sea. Josephus says (BJ, IV, viii, 4) that the Dead Sea extended "as far as Zoar of Arabia," while in Ant, I, xi, 4, he states that the place was still called Zoar. Eusebius (Onomasticon, 261) locates the Dead Sea between Jericho and Zoar, and speaks of the remnants of the ancient fertility as still visible. Ptolemy (v. 17,5) regards it as belonging to Arabia Petrea. The Arabian geographers mention it under the name Zughar, Sughar, situated 1 degrees South of Jericho, in a hot and unhealthful valley at the end of the Dead Sea, and speak of it as an important station on the trade route between Akkabah and Jericho. The Crusaders mention "Segor" as situated in the midst of palm trees. The place has not been definitely identified by modern explorers, but from Gen 19:19-30 we infer that it was in the plain and not in the mountain. If we fix upon the south end of the Dead Sea as the Vale of Siddim, a very natural place for Zoar and one which agrees with all the traditions would be at the base of the mountains of Moab, East of Wady Ghurundel, where there is still a well-watered oasis several miles long and 2 or 3 wide, which is probably but a remnant of a fertile plain once extending out over a considerable portion of the shallow south end of the Dead Sea when, as shown elsewhere (see DEAD SEA), the water level was considerably lower than now. Robinson would locate it on the northeast corner of el-Lisan on the borders of the river Kerak, but this was done entirely on theoretical grounds which would be met as well in the place just indicated, and which is generally fixed upon by the writers who regard the Vale of Siddim as at the south end of the Dead Sea. Conder, who vigorously maintains that the Vale of Siddim is at the north end of the Dead Sea, looks favorably upon theory of W.H. Birch that the place is represented by the present Tell Shaghur, a white rocky mound at the foot of the Moab Mountains, a mile East of Beth-haram (Tell er-Rameh), 7 miles Northeast of the mouth of the Jordan, a locality remarkable for its stone monuments and well-supplied springs, but he acknowledges that the name is more like the Christian Segor than the original Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/Z/ZOAR/

Zoar in Naves Topical Bible

A city of the Moabites, near the Jordan River Ge 13:10 -Territory of De 34:3; Isa 15:5; Jer 48:34 -King of, fought against Chedorlaomer Ge 14:2,8 -Not destroyed with Sodom and Gomorrah Ge 19:20-23,30

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/Z/ZOAR/

Zoar in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(smallness), one of the most ancient cities of the land of Canaan. Its original name was BELA. Ge 14:2,8 It was in intimate connection with the cities of the "plain of Jordan" --Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboiim, See also Ge 13:10 but not Gene 10:19 In the general destruction of the cities of the plain Zoar was spared to afford shelter to Lot. Ge 19:22,23,30 It is mentioned in the account of the death of Moses as one (of the landmarks which bounded his view from Pisgah, De 34:3 and it appears to have been known in the time both of Isaiah, Isa 15:5 and Jeremiah. Jer 48:34 These are all the notices of Zoar contained in the Bible. It was situated in the same district with the four cities already mentioned, viz. in the "plain" or "circle" of the Jordan, and the narrative of Ge 19:1... evidently implies that it was very near to Sodom. vs. Ge 19:15, 23:27 The definite position of Sodom is, and probably will always be, a mystery; but there can be little doubt that the plain of the Jordan was at the north side of the Dead Sea and that the cities of the plain must therefore have been situated there instead of at the southern end of the lake, as it is generally taken for granted they were. [SODOM] (But the great majority of scholars from Josephus and Eusebius to the present of the Dead Sea.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/Z/Zoar/

Zoar in Easton's Bible Dictionary

small, a town on the east or south-east of the Dead Sea, to which Lot and his daughters fled from Sodom (Gen. 19:22, 23). It was originally called Bela (14:2, 8). It is referred to by the prophets Isaiah (15:5) and Jeremiah (48:34). Its ruins are still seen at the opening of the ravine of Kerak, the Kir- Moab referred to in 2 Kings 3, the modern Tell esh-Shaghur.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/Z/Zoar/

Zoar in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Originally Bela; still called so when Abram first settled in Canaan (Genesis 14:2; Genesis 14:8; Genesis 14:10). Connected with the cities of the plain, Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim (Genesis 13:10). The southern division of the Dead Sea (apparently of comparatively recent formation), abounding with salt, and throwing up bitumen, and its shores producing sulphur and nitre, answers to the valley of Siddim, "full of slime pits," and to the destruction of the cities by fire and brimstone, and to the turning of Lot's wife into a pillar of salt. The S. bay is probably the vale of Siddim. Scripture does not say the cities were buried in the sea, but overthrown by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6). Josephus speaks of Sodomitis as burnt up and as adjoining the asphaltite lake (B. J., 4:8, Section 4). All ancient testimony favors the position of the cities being at the southern end. The traditional names of Usdum, etc., the traditional site of Zoar (called by Josephus, Ant. 1:11, Section 4, Zoar of Arabia), the hill of salt traditionally made Lot's wife, all favor their site being within or around the shallow southern bay. Tristram however identifies Zoar with Zi'ara at the northern end. Jerome (ad Joshua 15, and Quaest. in Genesis 14) and Theodoret (in Genesis 19) say Zoar was swallowed up by an earthquake probably after Lot had left it. So Wisdom (Wisdom of Solomon 10:6) says five cities were destroyed; so Josephus (B. J. 4:8, Section 4). But Deuteronomy 29:23 mentions only four; and Eusebius says Bela or Zoar was in his day garrisoned by Romans. It is the point to which Moab's fugitives shall flee (Isaiah 15:5; Jeremiah 48:34). Lot's view from the mountain E. of Bethel between Bethel and Ai (Genesis 13:3; Genesis 13:10; Genesis 12:8) is not to be pressed as though he could see all the plain of Jordan as far as to the S. of the Dead Sea; he saw only the northern end, but that sample assured him of the well watered character of the whole. From Pisgah or Nebo (Deuteronomy 34:3) Moses saw from "the plain of the valley of Jericho" southward as far as "unto Zoar"; not that Zoar was near Jericho, for Jehovah showed him "all the land of Judah and the South." It was probably on the S.E. side of the Dead Sea, as Lot's descendants, Ammon and Moab, occupied that region as their original seat. Tristram's statement that the ground of Zi'ara falls in terraces for 3,000 ft. to the Jordan valley is at variance with Lot's words, "I cannot escape to the mountain: behold this city (evidently not a place so hard to get up to as 3,000 ft. elevation) is near to flee unto, and it is a little one"; its inhabitants are so few that their sins are comparatively little, and so it may be spared. (Rashi.) Subsequently Lot fearing Zoar was not far enough from Sodom, nor high enough to be out of danger, fled to the mountains to which the angel originally urged his flight (Genesis 19:17-23; Genesis 19:30). God's assurance "I will not overthrow this city ... for the which thou hast spoken" ought to have sufficed to assure Lot; his want of faith issued in the awful incest of the mountain cave; compare the spiritual lesson, Jeremiah 3:23. Abulfeda spells it Zoghar. Fulcher, the crusading historian (Gesta Dei, 405), found Segor at the point of entrance to the mountains of Arabia, S. of the lake; probably in the wady Kerak, the road from the S. of the Dead Sea to the eastern highlands. Irby and Mangles found extensive ruins in the lower part of this wady, which they name Dera'ah, perhaps corrupted from Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/Z/Zoar/

Zoar in Hitchcock's Bible Names

little; small

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/Z/Zoar/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 14:8

And there went out the king of Sodom, and the king of Gomorrah, and the king of Admah, and the king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela (the same [is] Zoar;) and they joined battle with them in the vale of Siddim;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 14:2

[That these] made war with Bera king of Sodom, and with Birsha king of Gomorrah, Shinab king of Admah, and Shemeber king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela, which is Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 13:10

And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it [was] well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, [even] as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/13/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 19:22

Haste thee, escape thither; for I cannot do any thing till thou be come thither. Therefore the name of the city was called Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/19/

Zoar Scripture - Isaiah 15:5

My heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives [shall flee] unto Zoar, an heifer of three years old: for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/15/

Zoar Scripture - Jeremiah 48:34

From the cry of Heshbon [even] unto Elealeh, [and even] unto Jahaz, have they uttered their voice, from Zoar [even] unto Horonaim, [as] an heifer of three years old: for the waters also of Nimrim shall be desolate.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/48/

Zoar Scripture - Deuteronomy 34:3

And the south, and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/34/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 19:23

The sun was risen upon the earth when Lot entered into Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/19/

Zoar Scripture - Genesis 19:30

And Lot went up out of Zoar, and dwelt in the mountain, and his two daughters with him; for he feared to dwell in Zoar: and he dwelt in a cave, he and his two daughters.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/19/

Troas in Smiths Bible Dictionary

the city from which St. Paul first sailed, in consequence of a divine intimation, to carry the gospel from Asia to Europe. Ac 16:8,11 It is mentioned on other occasions. Ac 20:5,6; 2Co 2:12,13; 2Ti 4:13 Its full name was Alexandria Troas (Liv. xxxv. 42), and sometimes it was called simply Alexandria sometimes simply Troas. It was first built by Antigonus under the name of Antigonea Troas, and peopled with the inhabitants of some neighboring cities. Afterward it was embellished by Lysimachus, and named Alexandria Troas. Its situation was on the coast of Mysia, opposite the southeast extremity of the island of Tenedos. Under the Romans it was one of the most important towns of the province of Asia. In the time of St. Paul it was a colonia with the Jus Italicum. The modern name is Eski-Stamboul, with considerable ruins. We can still trace the harbor in a basin about 400 feet long and 200 broad.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Troas/

Troas in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a city on the coast of Mysia, in the north-west of Asia Minor, named after ancient Troy, which was at some little distance from it (about 4 miles) to the north. Here Paul, on his second missionary journey, saw the vision of a "man of Macedonia," who appeared to him, saying, "Come over, and help us" (Acts 16:8-11). He visited this place also on other occasions, and on one of these visits he left his cloak and some books there (2 Cor. 2:12; 2 Tim. 4:13). The ruins of Troas extend over many miles, the site being now mostly covered with a forest of oak trees. The modern name of the ruins is Eski Stamboul i.e., Old Constantinople.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Troas/

Troas in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Alexandria Troas, now Eshki Stamboul, "old Constantinople." A city of Mysia, S. of ancient Troy, opposite the island Tenedos. The country was called the Troad. Antigonus built and Lysimachus enlarged. Troas. It was the chief port between Macedonia and Asia Minor. The roads to the interior were good. Suetonius says Julius Caesar designed to establish there the seat of his empire (Caesar, 79); Augustus and Constantine meditated the same project. Roman sentiment attracted them to Troas, the alleged seat from whence Aeueas, the fabled progenitor of Rome's founder, originally migrated. The rains are large, and the harbour still traceable, a basin 400 ft. by 200 ft. Here on his second missionary tour Paul saw the vision of the man of Macedon praying, "come over and help us" (Acts 16:8-12). During his next missionary tour Paul rested a while in his northward journey from Ephesus, hoping to meet Titus (2 Corinthians 2:12-13). On his return from this his first gospel preaching in Europe, he met at Troas those who went before him front Philippi; he stayed at T. seven days, and here restored to life Eutychus who had fallen from the third loft, being overwhelmed with sleep during Paul's long sermon: a reproof of carelessness and drowsiness in church on the one hand, and of long and late preaching on the other (Acts 20:5-13). Here after his first imprisonment he left his cloak, books, and parchments in Carpus' house (2 Timothy 4:13). Troas had then the jus Italicum. Beautiful coins of Troas are extant, the oldest bearing the head of Apollo Sminthius. The walls enclose a rectangle, one mile from E. to W. and one mile from N. to S.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Troas/

Troas in Hitchcock's Bible Names

penetrated

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Troas/

Troas Scripture - Acts 20:6

And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/20/

Troas Scripture - 2 Timothy 4:13

The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring [with thee], and the books, [but] especially the parchments.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Timothy/4/

Troas Scripture - 2 Corinthians 2:12

Furthermore, when I came to Troas to [preach] Christ's gospel, and a door was opened unto me of the Lord,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Corinthians/2/

Troas Scripture - Acts 16:11

Therefore loosing from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next [day] to Neapolis;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/16/

Troas Scripture - Acts 16:8

And they passing by Mysia came down to Troas.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/16/

Troas Scripture - Acts 20:5

These going before tarried for us at Troas.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/20/

Tyre in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

tir (tsowr. tsor, "rock"' Turos, "Tyrus"; modern Sur): 1. Physical Features: The most noted of the Phoenician cities situated on the coast, lat. 33ø 17 minutes, about 20 miles South of Sidon and about 35 North of Carmel. The date of its foundation is uncertain, but it was later than that of Sidon. It is mentioned in the travels of the Egyptian Mohar, dating probably from the 14th century BC, and in the Tell el-Amarna Letters of about the same period. Herodotus describes the temple of Hercules at Tyre and says it was built 2,300 years before his time, which would carry back the beginning of the city to more than 2700 BC. It was a double city, one part on an island, a short distance from the shore, and the other on the mainland opposite. The island city had two harbors, connected by a canal, one looking North and the other South. The island was rocky and the city was fortitled on the land side by a wall 150 ft. high, the wall being of less elevation on the other sides. It was an exceedingly strong position, and is referred to in the Bible as the "strong" or "fortitled" city (Josh 19:29). The space within the walls was crowded with buildings, and is said to have contained 40,000 inhabitants. The town on the mainland was situated in a plain extending from the Ras el-`Abyad, on the South to Sarepta on the North, a distance of about 20 miles. It was fertile and well watered, the river Leontes (Litany) passing through it to the sea, about 5 miles N. of Tyre, and the copious fountain of Ras el-`Ain, 3 miles to the South, furnishing an abundant supply both for the city and the gardens. 2. History: (1) Tyre was for centuries subordinate to Sidon, but when the Philistines subdued the latter city, probably in the 12th century. (see SIDON), Tyre received an accession of inhabitants from the fugitives which gave it the pre- eminence. From this time dates its great commercial and colonial activity. Its mariners pushed boldly out to the West and founded colonies in Spain and North Africa, some of which, like Gades, Abdera and Carthage, became famous. They extended their commerce more widely than Sidon had ever done and ventured into the Atlantic and reached the coasts of Britain and West Africa. They reached out to the East also, and had their ships in the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, and their land routes threaded all Western Asia (see PHOENICIA). Tyre, like all the Phoenician...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TYRE/

Tyre in Naves Topical Bible

1. Kingdom of Hiram, king of 1Ki 5:1; 2Ch 2:3 Sends material to David for his palace 2Ch 2:3 Men and materials sent from, to Solomon, for the erection of the temple and his castles 1Ki 5:1-11; 9:10,11; 2Ch 2:3-16 See HIRAM -2. City of Situated on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea On the northern boundary of the tribe of Asher Jos 19:29 Pleasant site of Ho 9:13 Fortified Jos 19:29; 2Sa 24:7 Commerce of 1Ki 9:26-28; 10:11; Isa 23; Eze 27; 28:1-19; Zec 9:2; Ac 21:3 Merchants of Isa 23:8 Antiquity of Isa 23:7 Riches of Isa 23:8; Zec 9:3 Besieged by Nebuchadnezzar Eze 26:7; 29:18 Jesus goes to the coasts of Mt 15:21 Heals the daughter of the non-Jewish, Syrophenician woman near Mt 15:21-28; Mr 7:24-31 Multitudes from, come to hear Jesus, and to be healed of their diseases Mr 3:8; Lu 6:17 The hostility of Herod Agrippa I toward Ac 12:20-23 Paul visits Ac 21:3-7 To be judged according to its opportunity and privileges Mt 11:21,22; Lu 10:13,14 Prophecies relating to Ps 45:12; 87:4; Isa 23; Jer 25:22; 27:1-11; 47:4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TYRE/

Tyre in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(a rock), a celebrated commercial city of Phoenicia, on the coast of the Mediterranean. Its Hebrew name, Tzor, signifies a rock; which well agrees with the site of Sur, the modern town, on a rocky peninsula, formerly an island. There is no doubt that, previous to the siege of the city by Alexander the Great, Tyre was situated on an island; but, according to the tradition of the inhabitants, there was a city on the mainland before there was a city on the island; and the tradition receives some color from the name of Palaetyrus, or Old Tyre, which was borne in Greek times by a city on the continent, thirty stadia to the south. Notices in the Bible. --In the Bible Tyre is named for the first time in the of Joshua, ch. Jos 19:29 where it is adverted to as a fortified city (in the Authorized Version "the strong city") in reference to the boundaries of the tribe of Asher, But the first passages in the Hebrew historical writings, or in ancient history generally, which actual glimpses of the actual condition of Tyre are in the book of Samuel, 2Sa 6:11 in connection with Hiram king of Tyre sending cedar wood and workmen to David, for building him a palace; and subsequently in the book of Kings, in connection with the building of Solomon's temple. It is evident that under Solomon there was a close alliance between the Hebrews and the Tyrians. Hiram supplied Solomon with cedar wood, precious metals and workmen, and gave him sailors for the voyage to Ophir and India, while on the other hand Solomon gave Hiram supplies of corn and oil, ceded to him some cities, and permitted him to make use of some havens on the Red Sea. 1Ki 9:11-14, 26-28; 10:22 These friendly relations survived for a time the disastrous secession of the ten tribes, and a century later Ahab married a daughter of Ethbaal king of the Sidonians, 1Ki 16:31 who, according to Menander, was daughter of Ithobal king of Tyre. When mercantile cupidity induced the Tyrians and the neighboring Phoenicians to buy Hebrew captives from their enemies, and to sell them as slaves to the Greeks and Edomites, there commenced denunciations, and at first threats of retaliation. Joe 3:4-8; Am 1:9,10 When Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, had taken the city of Samaria, had conquered the kingdom of Israel, and carried its inhabitants into captivity, he laid siege to Tyre, which, however, successfully resisted his arms. It is in reference to this siege that the prophecy against Tyre in Isaiah, Isa 23:1 ... was uttered. After the siege of Tyre by Shalmaneser (which must have taken place not long after 721 B.C.). Tyre remained a powerful state, with its own kings, Jer 25:22; 27:3; Eze 28:2-12 remarkable for its wealth, with territory on the mainland, and protected by strong fortifications. Eze 26:4,6,8,10,12; 27:11; 28:5; Zec 9:3 Our knowledge of its condition thenceforward until the siege by...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tyre/

Tyre in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a rock, now es-Sur; an ancient Phoenician city, about 23 miles, in a direct line, north of Acre, and 20 south of Sidon. Sidon was the oldest Phoenician city, but Tyre had a longer and more illustrious history. The commerce of the whole world was gathered into the warehouses of Tyre. "Tyrian merchants were the first who ventured to navigate the Mediterranean waters; and they founded their colonies on the coasts and neighbouring islands of the AEgean Sea, in Greece, on the northern coast of Africa, at Carthage and other places, in Sicily and Corsica, in Spain at Tartessus, and even beyond the pillars of Hercules at Gadeira (Cadiz)" (Driver's Isaiah). In the time of David a friendly alliance was entered into between the Hebrews and the Tyrians, who were long ruled over by their native kings (2 Sam. 5:11; 1 Kings 5:1; 2 Chr. 2:3). Tyre consisted of two distinct parts, a rocky fortress on the mainland, called "Old Tyre," and the city, built on a small, rocky island about half-a-mile distant from the shore. It was a place of great strength. It was besieged by Shalmaneser, who was assisted by the Phoenicians of the mainland, for five years, and by Nebuchadnezzar (B.C. 586-573) for thirteen years, apparently without success. It afterwards fell under the power of Alexander the Great, after a siege of seven months, but continued to maintain much of its commercial importance till the Christian era. It is referred to in Matt. 11:21 and Acts 12:20. In A.D. 1291 it was taken by the Saracens, and has remained a desolate ruin ever since. "The purple dye of Tyre had a worldwide celebrity on account of the durability of its beautiful tints, and its manufacture proved a source of abundant wealth to the inhabitants of that city." Both Tyre and Sidon "were crowded with glass-shops, dyeing and weaving establishments; and among their cunning workmen not the least important class were those who were celebrated for the engraving of precious stones." (2 Chr. 2:7,14). The wickedness and idolatry of this city are frequently denounced by the prophets, and its final destruction predicted (Isa. 23:1; Jer. 25:22; Ezek. 26; 28:1-19; Amos 1:9, 10; Zech. 9:2-4). Here a church was founded soon after the death of Stephen, and Paul, on his return from his third missionary journey spent a week in intercourse with the disciples there (Acts 21:4). Here the scene at Miletus was repeated on his leaving them. They all, with their wives and children, accompanied him to the sea-shore. The sea-voyage of the apostle terminated at Ptolemais, about 38 miles from Tyre. Thence he proceeded to Caesarea (Acts 21:5-8). "It is noticed on monuments as early as B.C. 1500, and claiming, according to Herodotus, to have been founded about B.C. 2700. It had two ports still existing, and was of commercial importance in all ages, with colonies at Carthage (about B.C. 850) and all over the Mediterranean. It was often attacked by Egypt and Assyria, and taken by Alexander the Great after a terrible siege in B.C. 332. It is now a town of 3,000 inhabitants, with ancient tombs and a ruined cathedral. A short Phoenician text of the fourth century B.C. is the only monument yet recovered."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tyre/

Tyre in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Joshua 19:29; 2 Samuel 24:7; Isaiah 23:1; Ezekiel 26-28. In Phoenicia, E. of the Mediterranean, 20 miles S. of Sidon. Justin says the Sidonians founded Tyre after having been defeated by the king of Ascalon, 1209 B.C. according to the Parian marble. A double city, part on the mainland, part on an island nearly one mile long, and separated from the continent by a strait half a mile broad. Justin (xi. 10) records the tradition of the inhabitants that there was a city on the mainland before there was one on the island. Ezekiel represents the mainland city as besieged by Nebuchadnezzar's horses and chariots, and its walls assailed with "engines of war, forts, and mounts," and its towers broken down with axes; but the island city as sitting "in the heart of the seas" (Ezekiel 28:2, margin). The former, Old Tyre, stretched along the shore seven miles from the river Leontes on the N. to the fountain Ras el ain on the S., the water of which was brought into the city by aqueducts. Pliny (N. H., v. 17) says the circuit of both was 19 Roman miles, the island city being only 22 stadia. The difficulty is that the name "Tyre," meaning a "rock," belongs properly to the island city, there being no "rock" in the mainland city to originate the name; yet the mainland city is called "Old Tyre." Probably the Phoenician name of the mainland city resembled in sound but not sense the Greek Palaeo-Tyrus, and the latter name was given from a misunderstanding. Tyre is not mentioned in the Pentateuch, but first in Joshua 19:29 "the strong city Tyre." From tsor came its two names, Tyre, and Sara, now Sur (Arabic). Joshua implies it was on the shore, but the city and chief temple of Hercules (Melkarth, the tutelary god of Tyre) was probably on the island. Unlike other oriental cities, space being limited on the island, the houses were built in stories. The majority of the population was on the mainland. Hiram by substructures enlarged the eastern and southern sides, so as to afford room for a public place, Eurychorus. The northern or Sidonian harbour was 900 ft. long, 700 wide, protected by walls. The southern or Egyptian was formed by a great breakwater; the barbours could be closed by a boom; a canal through the city joined the harbours. "Tyre did build herself a strong hold" (Zechariah 9:3); so Diodorus Siculus (xvii. 40), "Tyre had the greatest confidence, owing to her insular position, fortifications and abundant stores." A double wall, 150 ft. high, besides the sea, secured island Tyre. "Her merchants were princes, and her traffickers the honourable of the earth" (Isaiah 23:7-8). Hiram, as friend and ally, supplied David...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tyre/

Tyre in Hitchcock's Bible Names

Tyrus

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tyre/

Tyre Scripture - 1 Kings 9:11

([Now] Hiram the king of Tyre had furnished Solomon with cedar trees and fir trees, and with gold, according to all his desire,) that then king Solomon gave Hiram twenty cities in the land of Galilee.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/9/

Tyre Scripture - 2 Chronicles 2:14

The son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father [was] a man of Tyre, skilful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson; also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device which shall be put to him, with thy cunning men, and with the cunning men of my lord David thy father.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/2/

Tyre Scripture - Joshua 19:29

And [then] the coast turneth to Ramah, and to the strong city Tyre; and the coast turneth to Hosah; and the outgoings thereof are at the sea from the coast to Achzib:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/19/

Tyre Scripture - 1 Kings 7:14

He [was] a widow's son of the tribe of Naphtali, and his father [was] a man of Tyre, a worker in brass: and he was filled with wisdom, and understanding, and cunning to work all works in brass. And he came to king Solomon, and wrought all his work.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/7/

Tyre Scripture - Acts 12:20

And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon: but they came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace; because their country was nourished by the king's [country].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/12/

Tyre Scripture - 2 Chronicles 2:3

And Solomon sent to Huram the king of Tyre, saying, As thou didst deal with David my father, and didst send him cedars to build him an house to dwell therein, [even so deal with me].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/2/

Tyre Scripture - 2 Chronicles 2:11

Then Huram the king of Tyre answered in writing, which he sent to Solomon, Because the LORD hath loved his people, he hath made thee king over them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/2/

Tyre Scripture - 1 Kings 5:1

And Hiram king of Tyre sent his servants unto Solomon; for he had heard that they had anointed him king in the room of his father: for Hiram was ever a lover of David.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/5/

Tyre Scripture - Isaiah 23:5

As at the report concerning Egypt, [so] shall they be sorely pained at the report of Tyre.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/23/

Tyre Scripture - Luke 10:13

Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/10/

Ur in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ur ('ur, "flame"; Codex Vaticanus Sthur; Codex Sinaiticus Ora): Father of Eliphal, one of David's "mighty men," in 1 Ch 11:35; in the parallel 2 Sam 23:34 called "Ahasbai."

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/U/UR/

Ur in Naves Topical Bible

1. Abraham's native place Ge 11:27,28 Abraham leaves Ge 11:31; 15:7; Ne 9:7 -2. Father of one of David's mighty men 1Ch 11:35

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/U/UR/

Ur in Smiths Bible Dictionary

was the land of Haran's nativity, Ge 11:28 the place from which Terah and Abraham started "to go into the land of Canaan." Ge 11:31 It is called in Genesis "Ur of the Chaldaeans," while in the Acts St. Stephen places it, by implication, in Mesopotamia. Ac 7:2,4 These are all the indications which Scripture furnishes as to its locality. It has been identified by the most ancient traditions with the city of Orfah in the highlands of Mesopotamia, which unite the table-land of Armenia to the valley of the Euphrates. In later ages it was called Edessa, and was celebrated as the capital of Abgarus or Acbarus who was said to have received the letter and portrait of our Saviour. "Two, physical features must have secured Orfah, from the earliest times, as a nucleus for the civilization of those regions. One is a high-crested crag, the natural fortifications of the crested citadel....The other is an abundant spring, issuing in a pool of transparent clearness, and embosomed in a mass of luxuriant verdure, which, amidst the dull brown desert all around, makes and must always have made, this spot an oasis, a paradise, in the Chaldaean wilderness. Round this sacred pool,'the beautiful spring Callirrhoe,' as it was called by the Greek writers, gather the modern traditions of the patriarch." --Stanley, Jewish Church, part i.p.7. A second tradition, which appears in the Talmud, finds Ur in Warka, 120 miles southeast from Babylon and four east of the Euphrates. It was the Orchoe of the Greeks, and probably the Ereck of Holy Scripture. This place bears the name of Huruk in the native inscriptions, and was in the countries known to the Jews as the land of the Chaldaeans. But in opposition to the most ancient traditions, many modern writers have fixed the site of Ur at a very different position, viz. in the extreme south of Chaldaea, at Mugheir, not very far above-- and probably in the time of Abraham actually upon-- the head of the Persian Gulf. Among the ruins which are now seen at the spot are the remains of one of the great temples, of a model similar to that of Babel, dedicated to the moon, to whom the city was sacred. (Porter and Rawlinson favor this last place.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/U/Ur/

Ur in Easton's Bible Dictionary

light, or the moon city, a city "of the Chaldees," the birthplace of Haran (Gen. 11:28,31), the largest city of Shinar or northern Chaldea, and the principal commercial centre of the country as well as the centre of political power. It stood near the mouth of the Euphrates, on its western bank, and is represented by the mounds (of bricks cemented by bitumen) of el-Mugheir, i.e., "the bitumined," or "the town of bitumen," now 150 miles from the sea and some 6 miles from the Euphrates, a little above the point where it receives the Shat el-Hie, an affluent from the Tigris. It was formerly a maritime city, as the waters of the Persian Gulf reached thus far inland. Ur was the port of Babylonia, whence trade was carried on with the dwellers on the gulf, and with the distant countries of India, Ethiopia, and Egypt. It was abandoned about B.C. 500, but long continued, like Erech, to be a great sacred cemetery city, as is evident from the number of tombs found there. (See ABRAHAM The oldest king of Ur known to us is Ur-Ba'u (servant of the goddess Ba'u), as Hommel reads the name, or Ur-Gur, as others read it. He lived some twenty-eight hundred years B.C., and took part in building the famous temple of the moon-god Sin in Ur itself. The illustration here given represents his cuneiform inscription, written in the Sumerian language, and stamped upon every brick of the temple in Ur. It reads: "Ur-Ba'u, king of Ur, who built the temple of the moon-god." "Ur was consecrated to the worship of Sin, the Babylonian moon-god. It shared this honour, however, with another city, and this city was Haran, or Harran. Harran was in Mesopotamia, and took its name from the highroad which led through it from the east to the west. The name is Babylonian, and bears witness to its having been founded by a Babylonian king. The same witness is still more decisively borne by the worship paid in it to the Babylonian moon-god and by its ancient temple of Sin. Indeed, the temple of the moon-god at Harran was perhaps even more famous in the Assyrian and Babylonian world than the temple of the moon-god at Ur. "Between Ur and Harran there must, consequently, have been a close connection in early times, the record of which has not yet been recovered. It may be that Harran owed its foundation to a king of Ur; at any rate the two cities were bound together by the worship of the same deity, the closest and most enduring bond of union that existed in the ancient world. That Terah should have migrated from Ur to Harran, therefore, ceases to be extraordinary. If he left Ur at all, it was the most natural place to which to go. It was like passing from one court of a temple into another. "Such a remarkable coincidence between the Biblical narrative and the evidence of archaeological research cannot be the result of chance. The narrative must be historical; no writer of late date, even if he were a Babylonian, could have invented a story so exactly in accordance with what we now know to have been the truth. For a story of the kind to have been the invention of Palestinian tradition is equally impossible. To the unprejudiced mind there is no escape from the conclusion that the history of the migration of Terah from Ur to Harran is founded on fact" (Sayce).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/U/Ur/

Ur in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Of the Chaldees (Genesis 11:28; Genesis 11:31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7), from which Terah, Abraham, and Lot were called. In Mesopotamia (Acts 7:2). Now Mugheir (a ruined temple of large bitumen bricks, which also "mugheir" means, namely, Um Mugheir "mother of bitumen"), on the right bank of the Euphrates, near its junction with the Shat el Hie from the Tigris; in Chaldaea proper. Called Hur by the natives, and on monuments Ur. The most ancient city of the older Chaldaea. Its bricks bear the name of the earliest monumental kings, "Urukh king of Ur"; his kingdom extended as far N. as Niffer. The royal lists on the monuments enumerate Babylonian kings from Urukh (2230 B.C., possibly the Orchanus of Ovid, Met. 4:212) down to Nabonid (540 B.C.) the last. The temple was sacred to 'Urki, the moon goddess; Ilgi son of Urukh completed it. For two centuries it was the capital, and always was held sacred. One district was "Ibra," perhaps related to "Hebrew," Abraham's designation. Ur was also a cemetery and city of tombs, doubtless because of its sacred character, from whence the dead were brought to it from vast distances for 1,800 years. Eupolemos (in Eusebius, Praep. Ev. 9:17) refers to Ur as "the moon worshipping (kamarine; kamar being Arabic for moon) city." The derivation from Ur, "fire," led to the Koran and Talmud legends that Abraham miraculously escaped out of the flames into which Nimrod or other idolatrous persecutors threw him. Ur lies six miles distant from the present coarse of the Euphrates, and 125 from the sea; though it is thought it was anciently a maritime town, and that its present inland site is due to the accumulation of alluvium (?). The buildings are of the most archaic kind, consisting of low mounds enclosed within an enceinte, on most sides perfect, an oval space 1,000 yards long by 800 broad. The temple is thoroughly Chaldaean in type, in stages of which two remain, of brick partly sunburnt, partly baked, cemented with bitumen.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/U/Ur/

Ur in Hitchcock's Bible Names

fire

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/U/Ur/

Ur Scripture - Genesis 11:28

And Haran died before his father Terah in the land of his nativity, in Ur of the Chaldees.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/11/

Valley of Jehoshaphat in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(`emeq yehoshaphaT); the latter word means "Yahweh judgeth," and `emeq, "wide," "open valley"; Septuagint he koilas Iosaphat): The name is used in Joel 3:2,12 of the scene of Judgment: "Let the nations bestir themselves, and come up to the valley of Jehoshaphat; for there will I sit to judge all the nations round about" (Joel 3:12). "The valley of decision" (or "sharp judgment") is another name the prophet gives to this spot (Joel 3:14). Some have identified it with the valley (`emeq) of BERACAH (which see) of 2 Ch 20:26, where King Jehoshaphat obtained a great victory, but this is improbable. Since the 4th century AD the KIDRON (which see) valley has been named the Valley of Jehoshaphat. The tradition is now strongest among the Moslems who point out the exact scene of the Judgment; the Bridge As Sirat, dividing heaven and hell, is to stretch across this valley from the Charam area to the Mount of Olives. It is, however, the ambition of every pious Jew to be buried on the slopes of this valley, to be at hand at the resurrection. This, too, was an ordinary place for Jewish graves in preexilic times (2 Ki 23:6, etc.). The valley today, especially that part adjacent to the temple, is crowded with Moslem and Jewish graves. A worthless tradition indicates the tomb of Jehoshaphat himself close to the so-called "Pillar of Absalom." Se KING'S VALE. There is not the slightest reason for believing that this is the spot referred to by Joel--indeed he may have spoken of an ideal spot only. The valley of the Kidron is a nachal ("ravine"), not an `emeq ("broad valley"). It is impos sible not to suspect that there is some connection between the name Jehoshaphat and the name of a village near the head of this valley--Shaphat; perhaps at one time it was Wady Shaphat, which name would readily suggest the traditional one.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/J/JEHOSHAPHAT,+VALLEY+OF/

Valley of Jehoshaphat in Naves Topical Bible

1. David's recorder 2Sa 8:16; 20:24; 1Ki 4:3; 1Ch 18:15 -2. One of Solomon's commissariat officers 1Ki 4:17 -3. King of Judah Succeeds Asa 1Ki 15:24; 22:41; 1Ch 3:10; 2Ch 17:1; Mt 1:8 Strengthens himself against Israel 2Ch 17:2 Inaugurates a system of public instruction in the law 2Ch 17:7-9 His wise reign 1Ki 22:43; 2Ch 17:7-9; 19:3-11 His system of taxation 2Ch 17:11 His military forces and armaments 2Ch 17:12-19 Joins Ahab in an invasion of Ramoth-gilead 1Ki 22; 2Ch 18 Rebuked by the prophet Jehu 2Ch 19:2 The allied forces of the Amorites, Moabites, and other tribes invade his territory, and are defeated by 2Ch 20 Builds ships for commerce with Tarshish, ships are destroyed 1Ki 22:48,49; 2Ch 20:35-37 Joins Jehoram, king of Israel, in an invasion of the land of Moab, defeats the Moabites 2Ki 3 Makes valuable gifts to the temple 2Ki 12:18 Death of 1Ki 22:50; 2Ch 21:1 Religious zeal of 1Ki 22:43,46; 2Ch 17:1-9; 19; 20:1-32; 22:9 Prosperity of 1Ki 22:45,48 Bequests of, to his children 1Ch 21:2,3 -4. Father of Jehu 2Ki 9:2,14 -5. A priest who assisted in bringing the ark of the covenant from Obed-edom 1Ch 15:24 -6. A valley Called THE VALLEY OF DECISION Joe 3:2,12,14

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/J/JEHOSHAPHAT/

Valley of Jehoshaphat in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(whom Jehovah judges.) 1. King of Judah, son of Asa, succeeded to the throne B.C. 914, when he was 35 years old, and reigned 25 years. His history is to be found among the events recorded in 1Ki 15:24; 2Ki 8:16 or in a continuous narrative in 2Ch 17:1 ... 21:3 He was contemporary with Ahab, Ahaziah and Jehoram. He was one of the best, most pious and prosperous kings of Judah, the greatest since Solomon. At first he strengthened himself against Israel; but soon afterward the two Hebrew kings formed an alliance. In his own kingdom Jehoshaphat ever showed himself a zealous follower of the commandments of God: he tried to put down the high places and groves in which the people of Judah burnt incense, and sent the wisest Levites through the cities and towns to instruct the people in true morality and religion. Riches and honors increased around him. He received tribute from the Philistines and Arabians, and kept up a large standing army in Jerusalem. It was probably about the 16th year of his reign, B.C. 898, when he became Ahab's ally in the great battle of Ramoth-gilead, for which he was severely reproved by Jehu. 2Ch 19:2 He built at Ezion-geber, with the help of Ahaziah, a navy designed to go to Tarshish; but it was wrecked at Ezion-geber. Before the close of his reign he was engaged in two additional wars. He was miraculously delivered from a threatened attack of the people of Ammon, Moab and Seir. After this, perhaps, must be dated the war which Jehoshaphat, in conjunction with Jehoram king of Israel and the king of Edom, carried on against the rebellious king of Moab. 2Ki 3:1 ... In his declining years the administration of affairs was placed, probably B.C. 891, in the hands of his son Jehoram. 2. Son of Ahilud, who filled the office of recorder of annalist in the courts of David, 2Sa 8:16 etc., and Solomon. 1Ki 4:3 3. One of the priests in David's time. 1Ch 15:24 4. Son of Paruah; one of the twelve purveyors of King Solomon. 1Ki 4:17 5. Son of Nimshi and father of King Jehu. 2Ki 9:2,14

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/J/Jehoshaphat/

Valley of Jehoshaphat in Easton's Bible Dictionary

mentioned in Scripture only in Joel 3:2, 12. This is the name given in modern times to the valley between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, and the Kidron flows through it. Here Jehoshaphat overthrew the confederated enemies of Israel (Ps. 83:6-8); and in this valley also God was to overthrow the Tyrians, Zidonians, etc. (Joel 3:4, 19), with an utter overthrow. This has been fulfilled; but Joel speaks of the final conflict, when God would destroy all Jerusalem's enemies, of whom Tyre and Zidon, etc., were types. The "valley of Jehoshaphat" may therefore be simply regarded as a general term for the theatre of God's final judgments on the enemies of Israel. This valley has from ancient times been used by the Jews as a burial-ground. It is all over paved with flat stones as tombstones, bearing on them Hebrew inscriptions.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/J/Jehoshaphat,+Valley+of/

Jehoshaphat in Hitchcock's Bible Names

the Lord is judge

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/J/Jehoshaphat/

Valley of Jehoshaphat Scripture - Joel 3:2

I will also gather all nations, and will bring them down into the valley of Jehoshaphat, and will plead with them there for my people and [for] my heritage Israel, whom they have scattered among the nations, and parted my land.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joel/3/

Valley of Jehoshaphat Scripture - Joel 3:12

Let the heathen be wakened, and come up to the valley of Jehoshaphat: for there will I sit to judge all the heathen round about.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joel/3/

Valley of Salt in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(ge' ha-melach): The scene of battles, firstly, between David or his lieutenant Abishai and the Edomites (2 Sam 8:13; 1 Ch 18:12; Ps 60, title), and later between Amaziah and these same foes (2 Ki 14:7; 2 Ch 25:11). It is tempting to connect this "Valley of Salt" with es Sebkhah, the marshy, salt-impregnated plain which extends from the southern end of the Dead Sea to the foot of the cliffs, but in its present condition it is an almost impossible place for a battle of any sort. The ground is so soft and spongy that a wide detour around the edges has to be made by those wishing to get from one side to the other. It is, too, highly probable that in earlier times the whole of this low-lying area was covered by the waters of the Dead Sea. It is far more natural to identify ge' ha-melach with the Wady el-Milch ("Valley of Salt"), one of the three valleys which unite at Beersheba to form the Wady ec-Ceba`. These valleys, el-Milch and ec-Ceba, together make a natural frontier to Canaan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SALT,+VALLEY+OF/

Valley of Salt in Naves Topical Bible

Lot's wife turned into a pillar of Ge 19:26 -The city of Salt Jos 15:62 -The valley of salt 2Sa 8:13; 2Ki 14:7 -Salt Sea Ge 14:3; Nu 34:12; De 3:17; Jos 3:16; 12:3; 15:2 -Salt pits Zep 2:9 -All animal sacrifices were required to be seasoned with Le 2:13; Ezr 6:9; Eze 43:24; Mr 9:49 -Used in ratifying covenants Nu 18:19; 2Ch 13:5 -Elisha throws, into the pool of Jericho, to purify it 2Ki 2:20,21 -FIGURATIVE Of the saving efficacy of the ekklesia of Christ Mt 5:13; Mr 9:49,50; Lu 14:34 Of wise behavior Col 4:6

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SALT/

Valley of Salt in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a valley in which occurred two memorable victories of the Israelite arms: 1. That of David over the Edomites. 2Sa 8:13; 1Ch 18:12 2. That of Amaziah. 2Ki 14:7; 2Ch 25:11 It is perhaps the broad open plain which lies at the lower end of the Dead Sea, and intervenes between the lake itself and the range of heights which crosses the valley at six or eight miles to the south. This same view is taken by Dr. Robinson. Others suggest that it is nearer to Petra. What little can be inferred from the narrative as to its situation favors the latter theory.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Salt,+Valley+of/

Valley of Salt in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a place where it is said David smote the Syrians (2 Sam. 8:13). This valley (the' Arabah) is between Judah and Edom on the south of the Dead Sea. Hence some interpreters would insert the words, "and he smote Edom," after the words, "Syrians" in the above text. It is conjectured that while David was leading his army against the Ammonites and Syrians, the Edomites invaded the south of Judah, and that David sent Joab or Abishai against them, who drove them back and finally subdued Edom. (Comp. title to Ps. 60.) Here also Amaziah "slew of Edom ten thousand men" (2 Kings 14:7; comp. 8: 20-22 and 2 Chr. 25:5-11).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Salt,+Valley+of/

Valley of Salt in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Gee', more accurately "ravine," Melach. The battle field between Judah and Edom where David and Amaziah conquered Abishai. (See JOAB; DAVID; AMAZIAH; ABISHAI.) (2 Samuel 8:13; 1 Chronicles 18:12; Psalm 60 title; 1 Kings 11:15-16; 2 Kings 14:7; 2 Chronicles 25:11). (See EDOM Near the salt mountain (Usdum), the upper part of the Arabah or plain S. of the Salt Sea; the boundary between Judah and Edom. Grove objects to this identification with the plain intervening between the Dead Sea and the heights which cross the valley seven miles to the S. For (1) ge is not elsewhere applied to a broad valley or sunk plain like the lower Ghor; 'eemeq or biquaah would be the name. (2) 'Arabah was the Hebrew name. (3) "Salt" is not necessarily the right translation of Melach. (4) Amaziah brought 10,000 prisoners to Sela (Petra), Edom's stronghold, and cast them down; he would scarcely bring so many prisoners from near the Dead Sea, 50 miles through a hostile and difficult country; more likely the valley of Salt was nearer Petra.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Salt,+valley+of/

Valley of Salt Scripture - 2 Samuel 8:13

And David gat [him] a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt, [being] eighteen thousand [men].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/8/

Valley of Salt Scripture - 2 Kings 14:7

He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/14/

Wilderness of Zin in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

zin (tsin; Sin): (1) A town in the extreme South of Judah, on the line separating that province from Edom, named between the ascent of Akrabbim and Kadesh-barnea (Nu 34:4; Josh 15:3). It must have lain somewhere between Wady el-Fiqra (the ascent of Akrabbim?) and `Ain Qadis (Kadesh-barnea); but the site has not been recovered. (2) The Wilderness of Zin is the tract deriving its name from the town (Nu 34:3). It is identified with the wilderness of Kadesh in Nu 33:36; while in other places Kadesh is said to be in the wilderness of Zin (Nu 20:1; 27:14; Dt 32:51). We may take it that the two names refer to the same region. The spies, who set out from Kadesh-barnea, explored the land from the wilderness of Zin northward (Nu 13:21; compare 32:8). It bordered with Judah "at the uttermost part of the south" (Josh 15:1). In this wilderness Moses committed the offense which cost him his hope of entering the promised land (Nu 27:14; Dt 32:51). It is identical with the uplands lying to the North and Northwest of the wilderness of Paran, now occupied by the `Azazimeh Arabs.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/Z/ZIN/

Wilderness of Zin in Naves Topical Bible

A desert south of Judah Nu 13:21; 20:1; 27:14; 33:36; 34:3,4; De 32:51; Jos 15:1,3

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/Z/ZIN/

Wilderness of Zin in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(flat), the name given to a portion of the desert tract between the Dead Sea, Ghor, and Arabah on the east, and the general plateau of the Tih which stretches westward. The country in question consists of two or three successive terraces of mountain converging to an acute single at the Dead Sea's southern verge, toward which also they slope. Kadesh lay in it, and here also Idumea was conterminous with Judah; since Kadesh was a city in the border of Edom. [See KADESH]. Nu 13:21; 20:1; 27:14; 33:36; 34:3; Jos 15:1

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/Z/Zin/

Wilderness of Zin in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a low palm-tree, the south-eastern corner of the desert et- Tih, the wilderness of Paran, between the Gulf of Akabah and the head of the Wady Guraiyeh (Num. 13:21). To be distinguished from the wilderness of Sin (q.v.).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/Z/Zin/

Wilderness of Zin in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

The N.E. portion of the wilderness of Paran. (See PARAN.) The spring of Kadesh lay in it (Numbers 20:1; Numbers 27:14; Deuteronomy 32:51). frontKADESH.) It probably stretched from the Arabah on the E. to Kadesh on the W. The wilderness of Zin formed the immediate boundary of Canaan (Numbers 13:21; Numbers 34:3), and comprised also the whole rugged mountain region S. of wady el Murrah, and wady el Fikrah as far E. as the Arabah, and as far W. as Ain Kadeis (fountain of Kadesh) and wady el Arish ("the river of Egypt".) The Arabah separated it from the mountains of Edom. On the declivity of a commanding hill within Edom's territory stands the village Dhana which may correspond to Zin. Though the wilderness of Zin does not strictly belong to Edom, yet it was connected with Edom; hence Judah's cities are said to lie "toward the coast of Edom" (Joshua 15:21). The wilderness of Kadesh is identical with the western part of the wilderness of Zin (Numbers 33:36). Kadesh was "in the uttermost border of Edom," i.e. in the uttermost W. of the wilderness of Zin which borders Edom (Numbers 20:16). The name Zin, i.e. coldness, however may be given from some cold fountain at the head of wady el Murrah. Do not confound it with "the wilderness of Sin."

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/Z/Zin,+wilderness+of/

Zin in Hitchcock's Bible Names

buckler; coldness

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/Z/Zin/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Numbers 13:21

So they went up, and searched the land from the wilderness of Zin unto Rehob, as men come to Hamath.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/13/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Numbers 20:1

Then came the children of Israel, [even] the whole congregation, into the desert of Zin in the first month: and the people abode in Kadesh; and Miriam died there, and was buried there.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/20/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Numbers 27:14

For ye rebelled against my commandment in the desert of Zin, in the strife of the congregation, to sanctify me at the water before their eyes: that [is] the water of Meribah in Kadesh in the wilderness of Zin.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/27/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Numbers 33:36

And they removed from Eziongaber, and pitched in the wilderness of Zin, which [is] Kadesh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Numbers 34:3

Then your south quarter shall be from the wilderness of Zin along by the coast of Edom, and your south border shall be the outmost coast of the salt sea eastward:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/34/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Deuteronomy 32:51

Because ye trespassed against me among the children of Israel at the waters of Meribah-Kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified me not in the midst of the children of Israel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/32/

Wilderness of Zin Scripture - Joshua 15:1

[This] then was the lot of the tribe of the children of Judah by their families; [even] to the border of Edom the wilderness of Zin southward [was] the uttermost part of the south coast.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Zaraphath in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

zar'-e-fath (tsarephath; Sarepta): The Sidonian town in which Elijah was entertained by a widow after he left the brook Cherith (1 Ki 17:9 ff). Obadiah refers to it as a Canaanite (probably meaning Phoenicia) town (Ob 1:20). It appears in the Greek form Sarepta in Lk 4:26 (the King James Version), and is said to be in the land of Sidon. Josephus (Ant., VIII, xiii, 2) says it was not "far from Sidon and Tyre, for it lay between them." Eusebius, Onomasticon (s.v. "Sarefta"), places it on the public road, i.e. the road along the seashore. It can be no other than the modern Sarafend, about 13 miles North of Tyre, on the spur of the mountain which divides the plain of Tyre from that of Sidon. The site of the ancient town is marked by the ruins on the shore to the South of the modern village, about 8 miles to the South of Sidon, which extend along the shore for a mile or more. They are in two distinct groups, one on a headland to the West of a fountain called Ain el-Qantara, which is not far from the shore. Here was the ancient harbor which still affords shelter for small craft. The other group of ruins is to the South, and consists of columns, sarcophagi and marble slabs, indicating a city of considerable importance. The modern village of Sarafend was built some time after the 12th century, since at the time of the Crusades the town was still on the shore. It is conjectured that the Syrophoenician woman mentioned in Lk 4:26 was an inhabitant of Zarephath., and it is possible that our Lord visited the place in His journey to the region as narrated in Mk 7:24-31, for it is said that he "came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee." The place has been identified by some with Misrephoth-maim of Josh 11:8 and 13:6, but the latter passage would indicate that Misrephoth-maim was at the limit of the territory of the Sidonians, which Zarephath was not in the days of Joshua. See MISREPHOTH-MAIM; SIDON. Originally Sidonian, the town passed to the Tyrians after the invasian of Shalmaneser IV, 722 BC. It fell to Sennacherib 701 BC. The Wely, or shrine bearing the name of el-Khudr, the saint in whom George is blended with Elijah, stands near the shore. Probably here the Crusaders erected a chapel on what they believed to be the site of the widow's house.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/Z/ZAREPHATH/

Zaraphath in Naves Topical Bible

(A city between Tyre and Sidon) -Elijah performs two miracles in 1Ki 17:8-24 -Called SAREPTA (A. V.) in Lu 4:26

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/Z/ZAREPHATH/

Zaraphath in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(smelting place), the residence of the prophet Elijah during the latter part of the drought. 1Ki 17:9,10 It was near to, or dependent on, Zidon. It is represented by the modern village of Sura-fend. Of the old town considerable indications remain. One group of foundations is on a headland called Ain el- Kanatarah; but the chief remains are south of this, and extend for a mile or more, with many fragments of columns, slabs and other architectural features. In the New Testament Zarephath appears under the Greek form of SAREPTA. Lu 4:26

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/Z/Zarephath/

Zaraphath in Easton's Bible Dictionary

smelting-shop, "a workshop for the refining and smelting of metals", a small Phoenician town, now Surafend, about a mile from the coast, almost midway on the road between Tyre and Sidon. Here Elijah sojourned with a poor widow during the "great famine," when the "heaven was shut up three years and six months" (Luke 4:26; 1 Kings 17:10). It is called Sarepta in the New Testament (Luke 4:26).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/Z/Zarephath/

Zaraphath in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("tsarfa'".) Elijah's residence during the drought (1 Kings 17:9-10); belonging to Sidon. A Canaanite, i.e. Phoenician city (Obadiah 1:20). Sarepta in Luke 4:26. The name means smelting shop. Now Surafend, a tell or hill, with a small village, seven or eight miles from Sidon, near the Zaharain river. The ancient town however was below on the shore; there, ruins of a flourishing city are found, columns, marble slabs and sarcophagi, and a chapel of the crusaders on the presumed site of the widow's house.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/Z/Zarephath/

Zaraphath in Hitchcock's Bible Names

ambush of the mouth

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/Z/Zarephath/

Zaraphath Scripture - Obediah 1:20

And the captivity of this host of the children of Israel [shall possess] that of the Canaanites, [even] unto Zarephath; and the captivity of Jerusalem, which [is] in Sepharad, shall possess the cities of the south.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Obediah/1/

Zaraphath Scripture - 1 Kings 17:9

Arise, get thee to Zarephath, which [belongeth] to Zidon, and dwell there: behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/17/

Zaraphath Scripture - 1 Kings 17:10

So he arose and went to Zarephath. And when he came to the gate of the city, behold, the widow woman [was] there gathering of sticks: and he called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/17/

Ziklag in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

zik'-lag (tsiqelagh, tsiqelagh (2 Sam 1:1), tsiqelagh (1 Ch 12:1,20); usually in the Septuagint Sekelak, or Sikelag): A town assigned (Josh 19:5; 1 Ch 4:30) to Simeon, but in Josh 15:31 named, between Hornah and Madmannah, as one of the cities of the Negeb of Judah, "toward the border of Edom." It is said (1 Sam 27:6) to have remained a royal city. In Neh 11:28 it is in the list of towns reinhabited by the returning children of Judah. Its chief associations are with David. Achish the Philistine king of Gath gave it to David as a residence (1 Sam 27:6 f; 1 Ch 12:1,20); it was raided by the Amalekites, on whom David took vengeance and so recovered his property (1 Sam 30:14,26); here the messenger who came to announce Saul's death was slain (2 Sam 1:1; 4:10). The site of this important place is not yet fixed with certainty; Conder proposed Zucheilika, a ruin 11 miles South-Southeast of Gaza, and 4 miles North of Wady es- Sheri'a, which may be the "Brook Besor" (1 Sam 30:9,10,21); Rowland (1842) proposed `Asluj, a heap of ruins South of Beersheba and 7 miles to the East of Bered. Neither site is entirely satisfactory. See Williams, Holy City, I, 463-68; BR, II, 201, PEF, 288, Sh XX.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/Z/ZIKLAG/

Ziklag in Naves Topical Bible

A city within the territory allotted to the tribe of Judah Jos 15:31 -Re-allotted to the tribe of Simeon Jos 19:5 -David lives at 1Sa 27:5,6; 2Sa 1:1; 1Ch 12:1 -Amalekites destroy 1Sa 30 -Inhabited by the returned exiles of Judah Ne 11:28

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/Z/ZIKLAG/

Tarsus in Hitchcock's Bible Names

winged; feathered

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tarsus/

Tarsus Scripture - Acts 22:3

I am verily a man [which am] a Jew, born in Tarsus, [a city] in Cilicia, yet brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, [and] taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers, and was zealous toward God, as ye all are this day.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/22/

Tarsus Scripture - Acts 9:11

And the Lord [said] unto him, Arise, and go into the street which is called Straight, and enquire in the house of Judas for [one] called Saul, of Tarsus: for, behold, he prayeth,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/9/

Tarsus Scripture - Acts 21:39

But Paul said, I am a man [which am] a Jew of Tarsus, [a city] in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city: and, I beseech thee, suffer me to speak unto the people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/21/

Tarsus Scripture - Acts 9:30

[Which] when the brethren knew, they brought him down to Caesarea, and sent him forth to Tarsus.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/9/

Tarsus Scripture - Acts 11:25

Then departed Barnabas to Tarsus, for to seek Saul:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/11/

Tekoa in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

te-ko'-a (teqoa', or teqo`ah; Thekoe; the King James Version Tekoah; one of David's mighty men, "Ira the son of Ikkesh," is called a Tekoite, te-ko'-it (teqo`i; 2 Sam 23:26; 1 Ch 11:28; 27:9; the "woman of Tekoa" [2 Sam 14:2] is in Hebrew teqo`ith; in Neh 3:5 mention is made of certain Tekoites, te-ko'its teqo'im, who repaired part of the walls of Jerusalem): 1. Scripture References: From here came the "wise woman" brought by Joab to try and make a reconciliation between David and Absalom (2 Sam 14:2 f); it was one of the cities fortified by Rehoboam (2 Ch 11:6; Josephus, Ant, VIII, ix, 1). The wilderness of Tekoa is mentioned (2 Ch 20:20) as the extreme edge of the inhabited area; here Jehoshaphat took counsel before advancing into the wilderness of Judea to confront the Ammonites and Moabites. In Jer 6:1, we read, "Blow the trumpet in Tekoa and raise a signal in Beth-haccherim"-- because of the enemy advancing from the North. Amos 1:1, one of the "herdsmen of Tekoa," was born here. In Josh 15:59 (addition to verse in Septuagint only) Tekoa occurs at the beginning of the list of 11 additional cities of Judah--a list which includes Bethlehem, Ain Kairem and Bettir--which are omitted in the Hebrew. A Tekoa is mentioned as a son of Ashhur (1 Ch 2:24; 4:5). Jonathan Maccabeus and his brother Simon fled from the vengeance of Bacchides "into the wilderness of Thecoe (the Revised Version (British and American) "Tekoah") and pitched their tents (the Revised Version (British and American) "encamped") by the water of the pool Asphar" (1 Macc 9:33). 2. Later History: Josephus calls Tekoa a village in his day (Vita, 75), as does Jerome who describes it as 12 miles from Jerusalem and visible from Bethlehem; he says the tomb of the prophet Amos was there (Commentary on Jeremiah, VI, 1). "There was," he says, "no village beyond Tekoa in the direction of the wilderness." The good quality of its oil and honey is praised by other writers. In the 6th century a monastery, Laura Nova, was founded there by Saba. In the crusading times Tekoa was visited by pious pilgrims wishing to see the tomb of Amos, and some of the Christian inhabitants assisted the Crusaders in the first siege of Jerusalem. In 1138 the place was pillaged by a party of Turks from the East of the Jordan, and since that time the site appears to have lain desolate and ruined, although even in the 14th century the tomb of Amos was still shown. 3. The Site of Tequ`a: The site is without doubt the Khirbet Tequ'a, a very extensive ruin, covering 4 or 5 acres, about 6 miles...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TEKOA/

Tekoa in Naves Topical Bible

1. Son of Ashur 1Ch 2:24; 4:5 Some authorities interpret these passages to mean that Ashur colonized the town of Tekoah -2. TEKOA See TEKOAH

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TEKOA/

Tekoa in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(a stockade). 1. A town in the tribe of Judah. 2Ch 11:6 on the range of hills which rise near Hebron and stretch eastward toward the Dead Sea. Jerome says that Tekoa was six Roman miles from Bethlehem, and that as he wrote he had that village daily before his eyes. The "wise woman" whom Joab employed to effect a reconciliation between David and Absalom was obtained from this place. 2Sa 14:2 Here also Ira the son of Ikkesh, one of David's thirty, "the mighty men," was born, and was called on that account "the Tekoite," 2Sa 23:26 It was one of the places which Rehoboam fortified, at the beginning of his reign, as a defence against invasion from the south. 2Ch 11:6 Some of the people from Tekoa took part in building the walls of Jerusalem, after the return from the captivity. Ne 3:6,27 In Jer 6:1 the prophet exclaims, "Blow the trumpet in Tekoa, and set up a sign of fire in Bethhaccerem." But Tekoa is chiefly memorable as the birthplace Am 7:14 of the prophet Amos. Tekoa is still as Teku'a. It lies on an elevated hill, which spreads itself out into an irregular plain of moderate extent. Various ruins exist, such as the walls of houses, cisterns, broken columns and heaps of building-stones. 2. A name occurring in the genealogies of Judah, 1Ch 2:24; 4:5 as the son of Ashur. There is little doubt that the town of Tekoa is meant.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tekoa+or+Tekoah/

Tekoa in Easton's Bible Dictionary

pitching of tents; fastening down, a town of Judah, about 12 miles south of Jerusalem, and visible from the city. From this place Joab procured a "wise woman," who pretended to be in great affliction, and skilfully made her case known to David. Her address to the king was in the form of an apologue, similar to that of Nathan (2 Sam. 12:1-6). The object of Joab was, by the intervention of this woman, to induce David to bring back Absalom to Jerusalem (2 Sam. 14:2, 4, 9). This was also the birth-place of the prophet Amos (1:1). It is now the village of Teku'a, on the top of a hill among ruins, 5 miles south of Bethlehem, and close to Beth-haccerem ("Herod's mountain").

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tekoa,+Tekoah/

Tekoa in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

2 Samuel 14:2. A town of Judah (2 Chronicles 11:6). Six Roman miles from Bethlehem, (to the S.E.,) which was six miles S. of Jerusalem. Tekoa was thus 12 from Jerusalem (Eusebius), but only nine by a shorter route (Jerome). The wise woman whom Joab suborned to persuade David to restore Absalom belonged to Tekoa (2 Samuel 14). Rehoboam fortified it (2 Chronicles 11:6). It was Amos' birthplace. Jeremiah, warning Judah to flee southward from the enemy advancing from the N. (Jeremiah 6:1), plays upon the sound tikehu Tekoa, "blow the trumpet in Tekoa." The derivation taaqa' "to strike" alludes to the stakes struck into the ground to secure the tents of the shepherds who roamed in "the wilderness of Tekoa," which was E. of the town or cluster of pastoral tents. Ira, one of David's thirty mighties, was a Tekoite (2 Samuel 23:26). The Tekoites repaired the wall under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:5; Nehemiah 3:27); but "their nobles put not their necks to the work of their Lord." Contrast Nehemiah 4:6, "the people had a mind to work" (Judges 5:28; Colossians 3:28). Amos' familiarity with the Tekoa desert and the danger of a shepherd's life affected his style. (See AMOS.) In the lists of Judah (1 Chronicles 2:24; 1 Chronicles 4:5) Ashur, Hezron's posthumous son and Caleb's brother, is mentioned as father, i.e. founder or prince, of Tekoa. Now Teku'a; within sight of "the Frank mountain," the site of Herod's castle, formerly Bethhaccerem; broken columns, heaps of bevelled stones, cisterns,and square foundations of houses, mark the site which is on a broad topped hill, with the remains of a square tower at the N.E.; it commands the view of the level range of the Moabite mountains, affording frequent glimpses of the Dead Sea. (See BETHHACCEREM.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tekoa/

Tekoa in Hitchcock's Bible Names

trumpet; that is confirmed

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tekoa/

Tekoa Scripture - Amos 1:1

The words of Amos, who was among the herdmen of Tekoa, which he saw concerning Israel in the days of Uzziah king of Judah, and in the days of Jeroboam the son of Joash king of Israel, two years before the earthquake.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Amos/1/

Tekoa Scripture - Jeremiah 6:1

O ye children of Benjamin, gather yourselves to flee out of the midst of Jerusalem, and blow the trumpet in Tekoa, and set up a sign of fire in Bethhaccerem: for evil appeareth out of the north, and great destruction.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/6/

Tekoa Scripture - 2 Chronicles 20:20

And they rose early in the morning, and went forth into the wilderness of Tekoa: and as they went forth, Jehoshaphat stood and said, Hear me, O Judah, and ye inhabitants of Jerusalem; Believe in the LORD your God, so shall ye be established; believe his prophets, so shall ye prosper.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/20/

Tekoa Scripture - 1 Chronicles 2:24

And after that Hezron was dead in Calebephratah, then Abiah Hezron's wife bare him Ashur the father of Tekoa.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/2/

Tekoa Scripture - 1 Chronicles 4:5

And Ashur the father of Tekoa had two wives, Helah and Naarah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/4/

Tekoa Scripture - 2 Chronicles 11:6

He built even Bethlehem, and Etam, and Tekoa,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/11/

Tel Abib in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

tel-a'-bib (tel 'abhibh; Vulgate (Jerome's Latin Bible, 390- 405 A.D.) ad acervum novarum frugum): 1. The Name and Its Meaining: As written in Hebrew, Tel-abib means "hill of barley-ears" and is mentioned in Ezek 3:15 as the place to which the prophet went, and where he found Jewish captives "that dwelt by the river Chebar." That Tel-abib is written, as Fried. Delitzsch suggests, for Til Ababi, "Mound of the Flood" (which may have been a not uncommon village-name in Babylonia) is uncertain. Moreover, if the captives themselves were the authors of the name, it is more likely to have been in the Hebrew language. Septuagint, which has meteoros, "passing on high," referring to the manner in which the prophet reached Tel-abib, must have had a different Hebrew reading. 2. The Position of the Settlement: If the Chebar be the nar Kabari, as suggested by Hilprecht, Tel-abib must have been situated somewhere in the neighborhood of Niffer, the city identified with the Calneh of Gen 10:10. The tablet mentioning the river Kabaru refers to grain (barley?) seemingly sent by boat from Niffer in Nisan of the 21st year of Artaxerxes I. Being a navigable waterway, this was probably a good trading-center.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TEL-ABIB/

Tel Abib in Naves Topical Bible

Residence of Jewish captives in Babylonia Eze 3:15

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TEL-ABIB/

Tel Abib in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(cornhill) was probably a city of Chaldaea or Babylonia, not of upper Mesopotamia as generally supposed. Eze 3:16 The whole scene of Ezekiel's preaching and visions seems to have been Chaldaea proper; and the river Chebar, as already observed, was not the Khabour, but a branch of the Euphrates.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tel-abib/

Tel Abib in Easton's Bible Dictionary

hill of corn, a place on the river Chebar, the residence of Ezekiel (Ezek. 3:15). The site is unknown.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tel-abib/

Tel Abib in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

The "hill" or "mound" Abib. The place of Ezekiel's residence among the Jewish captives in Babylonia, on the Chebar, a branch of the Euphrates (Ezekiel 3:15); the nahr Malcha, Nebuchadnezzar's royal canal.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tel-abib/

Tel Abib in Hitchcock's Bible Names

a heap of new grain

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Telabib/

Tel Abib Scripture - Ezekiel 3:15

Then I came to them of the captivity at Telabib, that dwelt by the river of Chebar, and I sat where they sat, and remained there astonished among them seven days.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/3/

Thessalonica in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

thes-a-lo-ni'-ka (Thessalonike, ethnic Thessalonikeus): 1. Position and Name: One of the chief towns of Macedonia from Hellenistic times down to the present day. It lies in 40 degrees 40 minutes North latitude, and 22 degrees 50 minutes East longitude, at the northernmost point of the Thermaic Gulf (Gulf of Salonica), a short distance to the East of the mouth of the Axius (Vardar). It is usually maintained that the earlier name of Thessalonica was Therma or Therme, a town mentioned both by Herodotus (vii.121 ff, 179 ff) and by Thucydides (i.61; ii.29), but that its chief importance dates from about 315 BC, when the Macedonian king Cassander, son of Antipater, enlarged and strengthened it by concentrating there the population of a number of neighboring towns and villages, and renamed it after his wife Thessalonica, daughter of Philip II and step-sister of Alexander the Great. This name, usually shortened since medieval times into Salonica or Saloniki, it has retained down to the present. Pliny, however, speaks of Therma as still existing side by side with Thessalonica (NH, iv.36), and it is possible that the latter was an altogether new foundation, which took from Therma a portion of its inhabitants and replaced it as the most important city on the Gulf. 2. History: Thessalonica rapidly became populous and wealthy. In the war between Perseus and the Romans it appears as the headquarters of the Macedonian navy (Livy xliv. 10) and when, after the battle of Pydna (168 BC), the Romans divided the conquered territory into four districts, it became the capital of the second of these (Livy xlv.29), while later, after the organization of the single Roman province of Macedonia in 146 BC, it was the seat of the governor and thus practically the capital of the whole province. In 58 BC Cicero spent the greater part of his exile there, at the house of the quaestor Plancius (Pro Plancio 41, 99; Epistle Ad Att, iii.8-21). In the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, Thessalonica took the senatorial side and formed one of Pompey's chief bases (49-48 BC), but in the final struggle of the republic, six years later, it proved loyal to Antony and Octavian, and was rewarded by receiving the status and privileges of a "free city" (Pliny, NH, iv.36). Strabo, writing in the reign of Augustus, speaks of it as the most populous town in Macedonia and the metropolis of the province...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/THESSALONICA/

Thessalonica in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of the Macedonia area) -Paul visits Ac 17:1; Php 4:16 -People of, persecute Paul Ac 17:5-8,11,13 -Men of, accompany Paul Ac 20:4; 27:2 -Paul writes to Christians in 1Th 1:1; 2Th 1:1 -Demas goes to 2Ti 4:10

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/THESSALONICA/

Thessalonica in Smiths Bible Dictionary

The original name of this city was Therma; and that part of the Macedonian shore on which it was situated retained through the Roman period the designation of the Thermaic Gulf. Cassander the son of Antipater rebuilt and enlarged Therma, and named it after his wife Thessalonica, the sister of Alexander the Great. The name ever since, under various slight modifications, has been continuous, and the city itself has never ceased to be eminent. Saloniki is still the most important town of European Turkey, next after Constantinople. Strabo in the first century speaks of Thessalonica as the most populous city in Macedonia. Visit of Paul. --St. Paul visited Thessalonica (with Silas and Timothy) during his second missionary journey, and introduced Christianity there. The first scene of the apostle's work at Thessalonica was the synagogue. Ac 17:2,3 It is stated that the ministrations among the Jews continued for three weeks. ver. 2. Not that we are obliged to limit to this time the whole stay of the apostle at Thessalonica. A flourishing church was certainly formed there; and the epistles show that its elements were more Gentile than Jewish. [For persecution and further history see PAUL] Circumstances which led Paul to Thessalonica. --Three circumstances must here be mentioned which illustrate in an important manner this visit and this journey as well as the two Epistles to the Thessalonians. 1. This was the chief station on the great Roman road called the Via Egnatia, which connected Rome with the whole region to the north of the AEgean Sea. 2. Placed as if was on this great road, and in connection with other important Roman ways. Thessalonica was an invaluable centre for the spread of the gospel. In fact it was nearly if not quite on a level with Corinth and Ephesus in its share of the commerce of the Levant. 3. The circumstance noted in Ac 17:1 that here was the synagogue of the Jews in this part of Macedonia, had evidently much to do with the apostle's plans,and also doubtless with his success. Trade would inevitably bring Jews to Thessalonica; and it is remarkable that they have ever since had a prominent place in the annals of the city. Later ecclesiastical history. --During several centuries this city was the bulwark not simply of the later Greek empire, but of Oriental Christendom, and was largely instrumental in the conversion of the Slavonians and Bulgarians. Thus it received the designation of "the orthodox city;" and its struggles are very prominent in the writings of the Byzantine historians.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Thessalonica/

Thessalonica in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a large and populous city on the Thermaic bay. It was the capital of one of the four Roman districts of Macedonia, and was ruled by a praetor. It was named after Thessalonica, the wife of Cassander, who built the city. She was so called by her father, Philip, because he first heard of her birth on the day of his gaining a victory over the Thessalians. On his second missionary journey, Paul preached in the synagogue here, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Macedonia, and laid the foundations of a church (Acts 17:1-4; 1 Thes. 1:9). The violence of the Jews drove him from the city, when he fled to Berea (Acts 17:5-10). The "rulers of the city" before whom the Jews "drew Jason," with whom Paul and Silas lodged, are in the original called politarchai, an unusual word, which was found, however, inscribed on an arch in Thessalonica. This discovery confirms the accuracy of the historian. Paul visited the church here on a subsequent occasion (20:1-3). This city long retained its importance. It is the most important town of European Turkey, under the name of Saloniki, with a mixed population of about 85,000.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Thessalonica/

Thessalonica in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A town of Macedonia on the Thermaic gulf, now the gulf of Saloniki. Therma was its original name, which Cossander changed into Thessalonica in honour of his wife, Philip's daughter. It rises from the end of the basin at the head of the gulf up the declivity behind, presenting a striking appearance from the sea. After the battle of Pydna Thessalonica fell under Rome and was made capital of the second region of Macedonia. Afterward, when the four regions or governments were united in one province, Thessalonica became virtually the metropolis. Situated on the Via Ignatia which traversed the S. coast of Macedonia and Thrace, connecting thereby those regions with Rome, Thessalonica, with its harbour on the other hand connecting it commercially with Asia Minor, naturally took the leading place among the cities in that quarter. Paul was on the Via Ignatia at Neapolis and Philippi, Amphipolis and Apollonia (Acts 16:11-40; Acts 17:1), as well as at Thessalonica. The population of Saloniki is even now 60,000, of whom 10,000 are Jews. Trade in all ages attracted the latter to Thessalonica, and their synagogue here was the starting point of Paul's evangelizing. Octavius Augustus rewarded its adhesion to his cause in the second civil war by making it "a free city" with a popular assembly ("the people") and "rulers of the city" (politarchs: Acts 17:1; Acts 17:5; Acts 17:8); this political term is to be read still on an arch spanning the main street, from it we learn there were seven politarchs. Its commercial intercourse with the inland plains of Macedonia on the N., and on the S. with Greece by sea, adapted it admirably as a center from whence the gospel word "sounded out not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but in every place" (1 Thessalonians 1:8). Paul visited T. on his second missionary tour. frontPAUL and JASON on this visit.) Other Thessalonian Christians were Demas perhaps, Gaius (Acts 19:29), Secundus, and Aristarchus (Acts 20:4; Acts 27:2; Acts 19:29). On the same night that the Jewish assault on Jason's house in search of Paul and Silas his guests took place, the latter two set out for Berea. Again Paul visited Thessalonica (Acts 20:1-3), probably also after his first imprisonment at Rome (1 Timothy 1:3, in accordance with his hope, Philemon 1:25-26; Philemon 2:24). Thessalonica was the mainstay of Eastern Christianity in the Gothic invasion in the third century. To Thessalonica the Sclaves and the Bulgarians owed their conversion; from whence it was called "the orthodox city." It was taken by the Saracens in 904 A.D., by the Crusaders in 1185 A.D., and by the Turks in 1430; and the murder of the foreign consuls in 1876 had much to do with the last war of 1876-1877, between Russia and Turkey. Eustathius, the critic of the 12th century, belonged to Thessalonica. The main street still standing is the old Via Ignatia, running E. and W., as is shown by the two arches which span it, one at the E. the other at the W. end; on that at the E. end are figures in low relief representing the triumphs of a Roman emperor.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Thessalonica/

Thessalonica in Hitchcock's Bible Names

victory against the Thessalians

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Thessalonica/

Thessalonica Scripture - 2 Timothy 4:10

For Demas hath forsaken me, having loved this present world, and is departed unto Thessalonica; Crescens to Galatia, Titus unto Dalmatia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Timothy/4/

Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 27:2

And entering into a ship of Adramyttium, we launched, meaning to sail by the coasts of Asia; [one] Aristarchus, a Macedonian of Thessalonica, being with us.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/27/

Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:11

These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/17/

Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:13

But when the Jews of Thessalonica had knowledge that the word of God was preached of Paul at Berea, they came thither also, and stirred up the people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/17/

Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:1

Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/17/

Thessalonica Scripture - Philippians 4:16

For even in Thessalonica ye sent once and again unto my necessity.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Philippians/4/

Thyatira in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

thi-a-ti'-ra (Thuateira): Thyatira was a wealthy town in the northern part of Lydia of the Roman province of Asia, on the river Lycus. It stood so near to the borders of Mysia, that some of the early writers have regarded it as belonging to that country. Its early history is not well known, for until it was refounded by Seleucus Nicator (301-281 BC) it was a small, insignificant town. It stood on none of the Greek trade routes, but upon the lesser road between Pergamos and Sardis, and derived its wealth from the Lycus valley in which it rapidly became a commercial center, but never a metropolis. The name "Thyatira" means "the castle of Thya." Other names which it has borne are Pelopia and Semiramis. Before the time of Nicator the place was regarded as a holy city, for there stood the temple of the ancient Lydian sun- god, Tyrimnos; about it games were held in his honor. Upon the early coins of Thyatira this Asiatic god is represented as a horseman, bearing a double-headed battle-ax, similar to those represented on the sculptures of the Hittites. A goddess associated with him was Boreatene, a deity of less importance. Another temple at Thyatira was dedicated to Sambethe, and at this shrine was a prophetess, by some supposed to represent the Jezebel of Rev 2:20, who uttered the sayings which this deity would impart to the worshippers. Thyatira was specially noted for the trade guilds which were probably more completely organized there than in any other ancient city. Every artisan belonged to a guild, and every guild, which was an incorporated organization, possessed property in its own name, made contracts for great constructions, and wielded a wide influence. Powerful among them was the guild of coppersmiths; another was the guild of the dyers, who, it is believed, made use of the madder-root instead of shell-fish for making the purple dyestuffs. A member of this guild seems to have been Lydia of Thyatira, who, according to Acts 16:14, sold her dyes in Philippi. The color obtained by the use of this dye is now called Turkish red. The guilds were closely connected with the Asiatic religion of the place. Pagan feasts, with which immoral practices were associated, were held, and therefore the nature of the guilds was such that they were opposed to Christianity. According to Acts 19:10, Paul may have preached there while he was living at Ephesus, but this is uncertain; yet Christianity reached there at an early time. It was taught by many of the early church that no Christian might belong to one of the guilds, and thus the greatest opposition to Christianity was presented. Thyatira is now represented by the modern town of Ak-Hissar on a branch line of the Manisa-Soma Railroad, and on the old Rom road 9 hours from Sardis. Ak-Hissar is Turkish for "white castle," and near the modern town may be seen the ruins of the castle from which the name was derived. The village is of considerable size; most of the houses are of mud, but several of the buildings erected by Caracalla are still standing, yet none of them are perfect. In the higher part of the town are the ruins of one of the pagan temples, and in the walls of the houses are broken columns and sarcophagi and inscribed stones. The population of 20,000 is largely Greek and Armenian, yet a few Jews live among them. Before the town is a large marsh, fever-laden, and especially unhealthful in the summer time, formed by the Lycus, which the Turks now call Geurdeuk Chai. The chief modern industry is rug-making.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/THYATIRA/

Thyatira in Naves Topical Bible

The hometown of Lydia, a convert of Paul Ac 16:14 -John given a message for Re 1:11; 2:18,24

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/THYATIRA/

Thyatira in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a city on the Lycus, founded by Seleucus Nicator, lay to the left of the road from Pergamos to Sardis, 27 miles from the latter city, and on the very confines of Mysia and Ionia, so as to be sometimes reckoned within the one and sometimes within the other. Dyeing apparently formed an important part of the industrial activity of Thyatira, as it did of that of Colossae and Laodicea. It is first mentioned in connection with Lydia, "a seller of purple." Ac 16:14 One of the Seven Churches of Asia was established here. Re 2:18- 29 The principal deity of the city was Apollo; but there was another superstition, of an extremely curious nature which seems to have been brought thither by some of the corrupted Jews of the dispersed tribes. A fane stood outside the walls, dedicated to Sambatha --the name of the sibyl who is sometimes called Chaldean, sometimes Jewish, sometimes Persian-- in the midst of an enclosure designated "the Chaldaeans' court." This seems to lend an illustration to the obscure passage in Re 2:20,21 which some interpret of the wife of the bishop. Now there is evidence to show that in Thyatira there was a great amalgamation of races. If the sibyl Sambatha was in reality a Jewess, lending her aid to the amalgamation of different religions, and not discountenanced by the authorities of the Judeo-Christian Church at Thyatira, both the censure and its qualification become easy of explanation. (The present name of the city is ak-Hissar ("white castle"). It has a reputation for the manufacture of scarlet cloth. Its present population is 15,000 to 20,000. There are nine mosques. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Thyatira/

Thyatira in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a city of Asia Minor, on the borders of Lydia and Mysia. Its modern name is Ak-hissar, i.e., "white castle." Here was one of the seven churches (Rev. 1:11; 2:18-28). Lydia, the seller of purple, or rather of cloth dyed with this colour, was from this city (Acts 16:14). It was and still is famous for its dyeing. Among the ruins, inscriptions have been found relating to the guild of dyers in that city in ancient times.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Thyatira/

Thyatira in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(Lydia, the probable agent of carrying the gospel to her native town.) (See LYDIA.) Thyatira lay a little to the left of the road from Pergamos to Sardis (Strabo 13:4, who calls it "a Macedonian colony"); on the Lycus, a little to the S. of the Hyllus, at the N. end of the valley between Mount Tmolus and the southern ridge of Tetanus. Founded by Seleucus Nicator. On the confines of Mysia and Ionia. A corporate guild of dyers is mentioned in three inscriptions of the times of the Roman empire between Vespasian and Caracalla. To it probably belonged Lydia, the seller of purple (i.e. scarlet, for the ancients called many bright red colors "purple") stuffs (Acts 16:14). The waters are so suited for dyeing that nowhere is the scarlet of fezzes thought to be so brilliant and permanent as that made here. Modern Thyatira contains a population of 17,000. In Revelation 2:18-25, "the Son of God who hath eyes like unto a flame of fire, and His feet like fine brass," stands in contrast to the sun god. Tyrimnas, the tutelary god of Thyatira, represented with flaming rays and feet of burnished brass. Christ commends Thyatira's works, charity, service, faith, and patience. Thyatira's "last works were more than the first," realizing 1 Thessalonians 4:1, instead of retrograding from "first love and first works" as Ephesus (Revelation 2:4-5); the converse of Matthew 12:45; 2 Peter 2:20. Yet Thyatira "suffered that woman Jezebel, which calleth herself a prophetess, to teach and to seduce My servants to commit fornication, and to eat things sacrificed unto idols." (See JEZEBEL.) Some self-styled prophetess, or collection of prophets (the feminine in Hebrew idiom expressing a multitude), closely attached to and influencing the Thyatira church and its presiding bishop or "angel" (the Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts read "thy wife" for "that woman") as Jezebel did her weak husband Ahab. The presiding angel ought to have exercised his authority over the prophetess or prophets so-called, who seduced many into the libertinism of the Balaamites and Nicolaitans of Thyatira's more powerful neighbour Pergamos (Revelation 2:6; Revelation 2:14; Revelation 2:16). (See BALAAMITES; NICOLAITANS.) The Lord encourages the faithful section at Thyatira. "Unto you (omit 'and' with the Alexandrinus and the Vaticanus manuscripts, the Sinaiticus manuscript reads: 'among ') the rest in Thyatira I say, ... I will put upon you none other burden (save abstinence from and protestation against these abominations: this the seducers regarded as an intolerable burden, see Matthew 11:30); but that which ye have hold fast until I come." A shrine outside Thyatira walls was sacred to the sibyl Sambatha, a Jewess or Chaldaean, in an enclosure called "the Chaldaean court."

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Thyatira/

Thyatira in Hitchcock's Bible Names

a perfume; sacrifice of labor

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Thyatira/

Thyatira Scripture - Acts 16:14

And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city of Thyatira, which worshipped God, heard [us]: whose heart the Lord opened, that she attended unto the things which were spoken of Paul.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/16/

Thyatira Scripture - Revelation 1:11

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Thyatira Scripture - Revelation 2:18

And unto the angel of the church in Thyatira write; These things saith the Son of God, who hath his eyes like unto a flame of fire, and his feet [are] like fine brass;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/2/

Thyatira Scripture - Revelation 2:24

But unto you I say, and unto the rest in Thyatira, as many as have not this doctrine, and which have not known the depths of Satan, as they speak; I will put upon you none other burden.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/2/

Tigris River in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ti'-gris (Tigris, the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew chiddeqel): One of the rivers of Eden going "eastward to Assyria" (Gen 2:14 margin), called the Great River (Dan 10:4), elsewhere mentioned in the apocryphal books, as in Tob 6:1; Judith 1:6; Ecclesiasticus 24:25, called Diglath in Josephus, and Diglit in Pliny, now called in Mesopotamia Dijleh, generally supposed to be a Semitic corruption of Tigra, meaning originally an arrow, which from its rapidity of motion is symbolized. The Tigris rises in the mountains of Armenia, latitude 38 degrees 10 minutes, longitude 39 degrees 20 minutes, only a few miles from the main branch of the Euphrates. After pursuing a tortuous southeasterly course for 150 miles, it is joined by the east branch at Osman Kieui, some distance below Diarbekr. Here the stream is 450 ft. wide and 3 or 4 ft. deep. Passing through numerous mountain gorges for another 150 miles, it emerges into the region of low hills about Nineveh, and a little below into the great alluvial plain of Mesopotamia. Thence in its course to Bagdad it is joined by the Great Zab, the Lesser Zab, the Adhem, and the Diyaleh rivers, bringing a large amount of water from the Zagros Mountains. At Bagdad the overflows from the Euphrates in high water often increase the inundations. The flood season begins early in the month of March, reaching its climax about May 1, declining to its natural level by midsummer. In October and November, the volume of water increases considerably, but not so much as to overflow its banks. Below Bagdad, throughout the region of Babylonia proper, the Tigris joins with the Euphrates in furnishing the water for irrigation so successfully used in ancient times. English engineers are at present with great promise of success aiming to restore the irrigating systems of the region and the prosperity of ancient times. The total length of the river is 1,146 miles. It now joins the Euphrates about 40 miles Northwest of the Persian Gulf, the two streams there forming the Shat el Arab, but in early historical times they entered the Persian Gulf by separate mouths, the Gulf then extending a considerable distance above the present junction of the rivers, the sediment of the streams having silted up the head of the Gulf to that distance.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TIGRIS/

Tigris River in Smiths Bible Dictionary

is used by the LXX. as the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew Hiddekel, and occurs also in several of the apocryphal books, as in Tobit, ch. 6:1, Judith, ch. 1:6, and Ecclesiasticus, ch. 24:25. The Tigris, like the Euphrates, rises from two principal sources in the Armenian mountains, and flows into the Euphrates. Its length, exclusive of windings, is reckoned at 1146 miles. It receives, along its middle and lower course no fewer than five important tributaries. These are the river of Zakko or eastern Khabour, the Great Zab (Zab Ala), the Lesser Zab (Zab Asfal), the Adhem, and the Diyaleh or ancient Gyndes. All these rivers flow from the high range of Zagros. We find but little mention of the Tigris in Scripture. It appears, indeed, under the name of Hiddekel, among the rivers of Eden, Ge 2:14 and is there correctly described as "running eastward to Assyria;" but after this we hear no more of it, if we accept one doubtful allusion in Nahum Na 2:6 until the captivity, when it becomes well known to the prophet Daniel. With him it is "the Great River." The Tigris, in its upper course, anciently ran through Armenia and Assyria.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tigris/

Tigris River in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(See HIDDEKEL.) Genesis 2:14, "running eastward to Assyria." Daniel 10:4, "the great river." Rising in the Armenian mountains, not far from the sources of Euphrates, it flows N.E. of the latter for 1,100 miles, when at last they join and flow as one river into the Persian gulf. Its greatest breadth is more than 200 yards. For the last two hundred, miles before its confluence with the Euphrates the country was intersected with artificial watercourses and adapted river beds, such as the Shat-el-Hie, or river of Hie; and in this district are the ruins of old towns; some scarcely known, as Zirgul, "the city of the brilliant light"; others better known, as Ur (Mugheir). (See UR.) It ran through Armenia and Assyria, and then separated Babylonia from Susiana. Subsequently it was the boundary between the Roman and Parthian empires.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tigris/

Tophet in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

to'-feth (ha-topheth, etymology uncertain; the most probable is its connection with a root meaning "burning"--the "place of burning"; the King James Version, Tophet, except in 2 Ki 23:10): The references are to such a place: "They have built the high places of Topheth, which is in the valley of the son of Hinnom, to burn their sons and their daughters in the fire" (Jer 7:31). On account of this abomination Topheth and the Valley of Hinnom should be called "The valley of Slaughter: for they shall bury in Topheth, till there be no place to bury," the Revised Version margin "because there shall be no place else" (Jer 7:32); see also Jer 19:6,12,13,14. Josiah is said to have "defiled Topheth" as part of his great religious reforms (2 Ki 23:10). The site of this shameful place would seem to have been either at the lower end of the Valley of Hinnom (see HINNOM, VALLEY OF), near where Akeldama is now pointed out, or in the open ground where this valley joins the Kidron.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TOPHETH/

Tophet in Naves Topical Bible

Also called TOPHETH -A place in the valley of the sons of Hinnom 2Ki 23:10 -Jewish children passed through the fire to the god Molech in 2Ki 23:10; Jer 7:31,32; 19:6,11-14; 32:35 -See also 2Ch 28:3; 33:6 -Destroyed by Josiah 2Ki 23:10 -Horror of Isa 30:33

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TOPHET/

Tophet in Smiths Bible Dictionary

and once To'phet (place of burning), was in the southeast extremity of the "valley of the son of Hinnom," Jer 7:31 which is "by the entry of the east gate." Jer 19:2 The locality of Hinnom is to have been elsewhere. [HINNOM] It seems also to have been part of the king's gardens, and watered by Siloam, perhaps a little to the south of the present Birket el-Hamra. The name Tophet occurs only in the Old Testament. 2Ki 23:10; Isa 30:33; Jer 7:31,32; 19:6,11,12,13,14 The New does not refer to it, nor the Apocrypha. Tophet has been variously translated. The most natural meaning seems that suggested by the occurrence of the word in two consecutive verses, in one of which it is a tabret and in the other Tophet. Isa 30:32,37 The Hebrew words are nearly identical; and Tophet war probably the king's "music-grove" or garden, denoting originally nothing evil or hateful. Certainly there is no proof that it took its name from the beaten to drown the cries of the burning victims that passed through the fire to Molech. Afterward it was defiled by idols and polluted by the sacrifices of Baal and the fires of Molech. Then it became the place of abomination, the very gate or pit of hell. The pious kings defiled it and threw down its altars and high places, pouring into it all the filth of the city, till it became the "abhorrence" of Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Topheth/

Tophet in Easton's Bible Dictionary

=Topheth, from Heb. toph "a drum," because the cries of children here sacrificed by the priests of Moloch were drowned by the noise of such an instrument; or from taph or toph, meaning "to burn," and hence a place of burning, the name of a particular part in the valley of Hinnom. "Fire being the most destructive of all elements, is chosen by the sacred writers to symbolize the agency by which God punishes or destroys the wicked. We are not to assume from prophetical figures that material fire is the precise agent to be used. It was not the agency employed in the destruction of Sennacherib, mentioned in Isa. 30:33...Tophet properly begins where the Vale of Hinnom bends round to the east, having the cliffs of Zion on the north, and the Hill of Evil Counsel on the south. It terminates at Beer 'Ayub, where it joins the Valley of Jehoshaphat. The cliffs on the southern side especially abound in ancient tombs. Here the dead carcasses of beasts and every offal and abomination were cast, and left to be either devoured by that worm that never died or consumed by that fire that was never quenched." Thus Tophet came to represent the place of punishment. (See HINNOM -T0001790.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tophet/

Tophet in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A spot in the valley of the son of Hinnom; S.E. and S.S.E. of Jerusalem; "by the entry of the E. gate" (Jeremiah 19:2). frontHINNOM.) Infamous by the immolation in it of children to Moloch (2 Kings 23:10; Isaiah 30:33; Jeremiah 7:31-32; Jeremiah 19:2; Jeremiah 19:6; Jeremiah 19:11). (See HELL.) From toph, the "drums" beaten to drown the shrieks of the children made to pass through the fire to Moloch; rather tophet means tabret, so "tabret grove," i.e. music grove, as Chinneroth is "the harp sea"; or tuph "to spit," less probably; or from a root "burning" (Persian, Gesenins); or "filth" (Roediger). One of the chief groves in Hinnom; forming part of the king's gardens, and watered by Siloam; Hinnom is placed by old writers E. of Jerusalem, answering to the month of the Tyropoeon, along the southern banks of the Kedron (Jerome De Loc. Hebrew). Topheth was next defiled by idols, Baal and Moloch, with their inhuman sacrifices. Josiah threw down its altars and heaped here the filth of the city, so that, with its carcasses preyed on by worms and its perpetual fires for consuming refuse, it became a type of hell (Isaiah 66:24). In Kings and Jeremiah the article precedes, "the Topheth" In Isaiah 30:33 it is Tophteh, "tabret grove," as tupim in Isaiah 30:32 is "tabrets." Jeremiah (Jeremiah 7:32; Jeremiah 19:6) makes it prophetically "the valley of slaughter," i.e. the scene, no longer of slaughter of innocents (Jeremiah 19:4), but of the Jewish men who so richly deserved their fate. In Isaiah 30:33 Topheth symbolizes the funeral pyre of Sennacherib's army, not that it actually perished there, but the Assyrian forerunner of antichrist is to be burnt in ignominy whereas the Hebrew buried their dead. Satan is the king finally doomed to the fire with the lost (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 25:41; Mark 9:43-44).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Topheth/

Tophet in Hitchcock's Bible Names

a drum; betraying

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tophet/

Tophet Scripture - 2 Kings 23:10

And he defiled Topheth, which [is] in the valley of the children of Hinnom, that no man might make his son or his daughter to pass through the fire to Molech.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/23/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 19:13

And the houses of Jerusalem, and the houses of the kings of Judah, shall be defiled as the place of Tophet, because of all the houses upon whose roofs they have burned incense unto all the host of heaven, and have poured out drink offerings unto other gods.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/19/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 19:11

And shalt say unto them, Thus saith the LORD of hosts; Even so will I break this people and this city, as [one] breaketh a potter's vessel, that cannot be made whole again: and they shall bury [them] in Tophet, till [there be] no place to bury.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/19/

Tophet Scripture - Isaiah 30:33

For Tophet [is] ordained of old; yea, for the king it is prepared; he hath made [it] deep [and] large: the pile thereof [is] fire and much wood; the breath of the LORD, like a stream of brimstone, doth kindle it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/30/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 19:6

Therefore, behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that this place shall no more be called Tophet, nor The valley of the son of Hinnom, but The valley of slaughter.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/19/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 7:31

And they have built the high places of Tophet, which [is] in the valley of the son of Hinnom, to burn their sons and their daughters in the fire; which I commanded [them] not, neither came it into my heart.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/7/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 19:14

Then came Jeremiah from Tophet, whither the LORD had sent him to prophesy; and he stood in the court of the LORD'S house; and said to all the people,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/19/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 19:12

Thus will I do unto this place, saith the LORD, and to the inhabitants thereof, and [even] make this city as Tophet:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/19/

Tophet Scripture - Jeremiah 7:32

Therefore, behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that it shall no more be called Tophet, nor the valley of the son of Hinnom, but the valley of slaughter: for they shall bury in Tophet, till there be no place.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/7/

Troas in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

tro'-as (Troas): The chief city in the Northwest of Asia Minor, on the coast of Mysia in the Roman province of Asia. From here, according to Acts 16:8, Paul sailed. Here, also, according to Acts 20:5-12, Paul raised Eutychus from the dead. The name Troas was not confined to the town itself, but it was also applied to the surrounding district, or to that part of the coast which is now generally known as the Troad. In its early history it bore the name of Antigona Troas, which was given it by its founder Antigonus, but after 300 BC it was generally known to the classical writers as Alexander Troas, a name given to it by Lysimachus. For a time the Seleucid kings made their homes at Troas. Later, when the city became free, it struck its own coins, of which vast numbers are found; a common type is one upon which is stamped a grazing horse. In 133 BC Troas came into the possession of the Romans, and later, during the reign of Augustus, it was made a Roman colonia, independent of the Roman governor of the province of Asia. Its citizens were then exempt from poll and land tax. During Byzantine times Troas was the seat of a bishopric. The ruins of Troas, now bearing the name of Eski Stambul, are extensive, giving evidence of the great size and importance of the ancient city. They have, however, long been used as a quarry, and the columns of the public buildings were taken to Constantinople for use in the construction of the mosque known as the Yeni Valideh Jami. The site is now mostly overgrown with oaks, but from the higher portions of the ruins there is an extensive view over the sea and the neighboring islands. It is only with difficulty that one may now trace the city walls and locate the square towers which flanked them at intervals. Within the walls are the remains of theater, the temple and the gymnasium, which was provided with baths. The port from which Paul sailed was constructed by means of a mole, with an outer and an inner basin. The most imposing of the ruins, however, is a large aqueduct which was built in the time of Trajan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TROAS/

Troas in Naves Topical Bible

(A seaport of Mysia, in Asia Minor) -Paul visits Ac 16:8,11; 20:5,6; 2Co 2:12; 2Ti 4:13

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TROAS/

Succoth Scripture - Exodus 12:37

And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand on foot [that were] men, beside children.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/12/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:5

And he said unto the men of Succoth, Give, I pray you, loaves of bread unto the people that follow me; for they [be] faint, and I am pursuing after Zebah and Zalmunna, kings of Midian.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Succoth Scripture - Psalms 60:6

God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/60/

Succoth Scripture - Psalms 108:7

God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/108/

Succoth Scripture - 1 Kings 7:46

In the plain of Jordan did the king cast them, in the clay ground between Succoth and Zarthan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/7/

Succoth Scripture - 2 Chronicles 4:17

In the plain of Jordan did the king cast them, in the clay ground between Succoth and Zeredathah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/4/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:16

And he took the elders of the city, and thorns of the wilderness and briers, and with them he taught the men of Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Succoth Scripture - Exodus 13:20

And they took their journey from Succoth, and encamped in Etham, in the edge of the wilderness.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/13/

Succoth Scripture - Numbers 33:5

And the children of Israel removed from Rameses, and pitched in Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Succoth Scripture - Numbers 33:6

And they departed from Succoth, and pitched in Etham, which [is] in the edge of the wilderness.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Succoth Scripture - Genesis 33:17

And Jacob journeyed to Succoth, and built him an house, and made booths for his cattle: therefore the name of the place is called Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/33/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:14

And caught a young man of the men of Succoth, and enquired of him: and he described unto him the princes of Succoth, and the elders thereof, [even] threescore and seventeen men.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Sychar in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

si'-kar (Suchar): Mentioned only once, in connection with the visit of Jesus to Jacob's Well (Jn 4:5). He was passing through Samaria on His way to Galilee, "so he cometh to a city of Samaria, called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph: and Jacob's well was there." Jerome thought the name was a clerical error for Sychem (Epistle 86). In Eusebius (in Onomasticon) he is content to translate Eusebius, placing Sychar East of Neapolis. It is now generally admitted that the text is correct. Some have held, however, that Sychar is only another name for Shechem ("Sychem"). It is suggested, e.g., that it is a nickname applied in contempt by the Jews, being either shikkor, "drunken," or sheqer, "falsehood." Others think the form has arisen through change of "m" to "r" in pronunciation; as "l" to "r" in Beliar. These theories may safely be set aside. The evidence that Sychar was a distinct place East of Shechem may be described as overwhelming. It is carefully and perspicuously marshaled by G. A. Smith (Historical Geography of the Holy Land, 367 ff). The manner in which it is mentioned shows that it was not a specially well-known place: "a city of Samaria called Sychar." No one familiar with Israel would have written "a city of Samaria called Sychem." It is mentioned only because of its nearness to the well. As to the position of the well, there is general agreement (see JACOB'S WELL). It is on the right of the road where it bends from the plain of Makhneh into the pass of Shechem. Fully half a mile off, on the edge of the plain, is the village of `Askar, on the lower slope of Ebal. A little to the West is the traditional tomb of Joseph. This is the district East of Shechem usually identified with Jacob's "parcel of ground." Many have sought to find Sychar in the modern `Askar. There are two difficulties. The first is the initial letter `ain in the modern name. But G. A. Smith has shown that such a change as this, although unusual, is not impossible. The second is the presence of the copious spring, `Ain `Askar, which would make it unnecessary for the villagers to carry water from Jacob's Well. This cannot easily be explained away. One could understand a special journey at times, if any peculiar value attached to the water in the well; but from it, evidently, the woman drew her ordinary supplies (Jn 4:15). This difficulty would probably in any case be fatal to the claim of the village at `Ain `Askar to represent the ancient Sychar. But Professor R. S. A. Macalister has shown reason to believe that the village is not older than Arab times (PEFS, 1907, 92 ff). He examined the mound Telul Balata, nearly 1/2 mile Southwest of `Askar, and just West of Joseph's tomb. There he found evidence of occupation from the days of the Hebrew monarchy down to the time of Christ. Here there is no spring; and it is only 1/4 mile distant from Jacob's Well--nearer therefore to the well than to `Askar. In other respects the site is suitable, so that perhaps here we may locate the Sychar of the Gospel. The name may easily have migrated to `Askar when the village fell into decay.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SYCHAR/

Sychar in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a place named only in Joh 4:5 Sychar was either a name applied to the town of Shechem or it was an independent place. The first of these alternatives is now almost universally accepted. [SHECHEM]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sychar/

Sychar in Easton's Bible Dictionary

liar or drunkard (see Isa. 28:1, 7), has been from the time of the Crusaders usually identified with Sychem or Shechem (John 4:5). It has now, however, as the result of recent explorations, been identified with 'Askar, a small Samaritan town on the southern base of Ebal, about a mile to the north of Jacob's well.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sychar/

Sychar in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

John 4:5. Shechem or Nablus (Jerome Quaest. Genesis 48:22) corrupted into Sichem, Sychar. Some think it an intentional corruption, as if from sheker "falsehood," or shikor "drunkard" (Isaiah 28:1; Isaiah 28:7), due to Jewish bigotry against the Samaritans. It is objected that Jacob's well at the entrance into the valley is a mile and a half from Shechem, and that it is unlikely the woman, if belonging to Shechem, would go so far for water when plenty was nearer at hand; but Robinson conjectures the town had extensive suburbs anciently which reached to near Jacob's well. The woman probably went to this well, irrespectively of distance, just because it was Jacob's; her looking for "Messiah" is in consonance with this, besides the well was deep and the water therefore especially good. However Sychar may have been close to the well; and (Thomson, Land and Book, 31) the present village, Aschar, just above Jacob's well, on the side of Ebal and on the road by which caravans pass from Jerusalem to Damascus, and by which doubtless Jesus passed between Judaea and Galilee, may answer to Sychar. So Jerome and Eusebius (Onomasticon) make S. "before," i.e. E. of, Neapolis (Shechem) by the field of Joseph with Jacob's well. The Bordeaux pilgrim (A.D. 333) puts Sechar or Sychar a Roman mile from Sychem, which he makes a suburb of Neapolis. "A city of Samaria called Sychar" is language not likely to be used of the metropolis Shechem; moreover the name Sychem occurs Acts 7:16. On the other hand "called" suits the idea that Sychar is a Jewish nickname for Shechem. Lt. Conder favors Aschar, which is the translation of the Samaritan Iskar, not from the Hebrew "drunkard," but from a Hebrew Aramaic root meaning "to be shut up." This derivation and the description in John 4:5-6 answer accurately to Aschar. Jacob's well is at the point where the narrow vale of Shechem broadens into the great plain; it is 2,000 yards E. of Nablus (Shechem), which is hidden from it. The tomb of Joseph is a third of a mile northeastward, thence a path ascends to Aschar which is visible from Jacob's well. frontIsrael Exploration Quarterly Statement, July 1877, p. 149.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sychar/

Sychar in Hitchcock's Bible Names

end

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sychar/

Sychar Scripture - John 4:5

Then cometh he to a city of Samaria, which is called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/4/

Syria in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

sir'-i-a (Suria (Mt 4:24; Lk 2:2)): 1. Name and Its Origin 2. Other Designations 3. Physical (1) The Maritime Plain (2) First MoUntain Belt (3) Second Mountain Belt (4) Great Central Valley (5) The Eastern Belt (6) Rivers (7) Nature of Soil (8) Flora (9) Fauna (10) Minerals (11) Central Position 4. History (1) Canaanitic Semites (2) Sargon of Agade (3) Babylonian Supremacy (4) Hittite and Aramean (5) Hittites and Egyptians (6) Amarna Period (7) Rameses II (8) Philistines (9) Tiglath-pileser I (10) Aramean States (11) Peaceful Development (12) Shalmaneser II (13) Tiglath-pileser III (14) Shalmaneser IV and Sargon (15) Pharaoh-necoh and Nebuchadnezzar 1. Name and Its Origin: The name does not occur in the Massoretic Text nor the Peshitta of the Old Testament, but is found in the Septuagint, in the Peshitta of the New Testament and in the Mishna In the Septuagint it represents "Aram" in all its combinations, as Aram-zobah, etc. The name itself first appears in Herodotus vii.63, where he says that "Syrians" and "Assyrians" were the Greek and barbarian designations of the same people. Otherwise he is quite vague in his use of the term. Xenophon is clearer when he (Anab; vii.8, 25) distinguishes between Syria and Phoenicia. Syria is undoubtedly an extension of the name "Suri" the ancient Babylonian designation of a district in North Mesopotamia, but later embracing regions beyond the Euphrates to the North and West, as far as the Taurus. Under the Seleucids, Syria was regarded as coextensive with their kingdom, and the name shrank with its dimensions. Strabo, Pliny and Ptolemy give its boundaries as the Taurus Mountains, the Euphrates, the Syro-Arabian desert and the Mediterranean, and the territory within these limits is still politically designated Syria, though popularly Israel is generally named separately. 2. Other Designations: Homer (Iliad ii.785) and Hesiod (Theog. 304) call the inhabitants of the district "Arimoi," with which compare the cuneiform "Arimu" or "Aramu" for Arameans. The earliest Assyrian name was "Martu," which Hommel regards as a contraction of "Amartu," the land of the "Amurru" or Amorites. In Egyptian records the country is named "Ruten" or "Luten," and divided into "Lower" and "Upper," the former denoting Israel and the latter Syria proper. 3. Physical: (1) The Maritime Plain. Syria, within the boundaries...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SYRIA+(1)/

Syria in Naves Topical Bible

(The highlands lying between the Euphrates River and the Mediterranean Sea) -Called ARAM, from the son of Shem Ge 10:22,23; Nu 23:7; 1Ch 1:17; 2:23 -During the time of Abraham it seems to have embraced the region between the Tigris River and the Euphrates River Ge 24:10; with 25:20 -Including Padan-aram Ge 25:20; 28:5 -Minor kingdoms within the region Aram-zobah, also called, ZOBAH and ZOBA 1Sa 14:47; 2Sa 8:3; 10:6,8; 1Ki 11:23; 1Ch 18:5,9; 19:6 And in the title of Ps 60 Geshur 2Sa 15:8 Aram-rehob, also called BETH-REHOB 2Sa 10:6,8 Damascus 2Sa 8:5,6; 1Ch 18:5,6 Hamath 2Sa 8:9,10 -Conquest of By David 2Sa 8:3-13 By Jeroboam 2Ki 14:25,28 By Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria 2Ki 16:7-9; 18:33,34 -People of, colonized in Samaria by the king of Assyria 2Ki 17:24 -Confederates with Nebuchadnezzar 2Ki 24:2; Jer 39:5 -The Roman province of, included the land of Canaan Lu 2:2,3 -And it included Phoenicia Mr 7:26; Ac 21:3 -The fame of Jesus extended over Mt 4:24 -Paul goes to, with letters to apprehend the Christians; is converted and begins his evangelistic ministry Ac 9:1-31 -See PAUL -Paul preaches in Ac 15:41; 18:18; 21:3; Ga 1:21 -Damascus, the capitol of See DAMASCUS -Wars between, and the kingdoms of Judah and Israel See ISRAEL -Prophecies concerning Isa 7:8-16; 8:4-7; 17:1-3; Jer 1:15; 49:23-27; Am 1:3-5; Zec 9:1

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SYRIA/

Syria in Smiths Bible Dictionary

is the term used throughout our version for the Hebrew Aram, as well as for the Greek Zupia. Most probably Syria is for Tsyria, the country about Tsur or Tyre which was the first of the Syrian towns known to the Greeks. It is difficult to fix the limits of Syria. The limits of the Hebrew Aram and its subdivisions are spoken of under ARAM. Syria proper was bounded by Amanus and Taurus on the north by the Euphrates and the Arabian desert on the east, by Israel on the south, by the Mediterranean near the mouth of the Orontes, and then by Phoenicia on the west. This tract is about 300 miles long from north to south, and from 50 to 150 miles broad. It contains an area of about 30,000 square miles. General physical features. --The general character of the tract is mountainous, as the Hebrew name Aram (from a roof signifying "height") sufficiently implies. The most fertile and valuable tract of Syria is the long valley intervening between Libanus and Anti-Libanus. Of the various mountain ranges of Syria, Lebanon possesses the greatest interest. It extends from the mouth of the Litany to Arka, a distance of nearly 100 miles. Anti-Libanus, as the name implies, stands lover against Lebanon, running in the same direction, i.e. nearly north and south, and extending the same length. [LEBANON] The principal rivers of Syria are the Litany and the Orontes. The Litany springs from a small lake situated in the middle of the Coele-Syrian valley, about six miles to the southwest of Baalbek. It enters the sea about five miles north of Tyre. The source of the Orontes is but about 15 miles from that of the Litany. Its modern name is the Nahr-el-Asi, or "rebel stream," an appellation given to it on account of its violence and impetuosity in many parts of its course. The chief towns of Syria may be...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Syria/

Syria in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(Heb. Aram), the name in the Old Testament given to the whole country which lay to the north-east of Phoenicia, extending to beyond the Euphrates and the Tigris. Mesopotamia is called (Gen. 24:10; Deut. 23:4) Aram-naharain (=Syria of the two rivers), also Padan-aram (Gen. 25:20). Other portions of Syria were also known by separate names, as Aram-maahah (1 Chr. 19:6), Aram-beth-rehob (2 Sam. 10:6), Aram-zobah (2 Sam. 10:6, 8). All these separate little kingdoms afterwards became subject to Damascus. In the time of the Romans, Syria included also a part of Israel and Asia Minor. "From the historic annals now accessible to us, the history of Syria may be divided into three periods: The first, the period when the power of the Pharaohs was dominant over the fertile fields or plains of Syria and the merchant cities of Tyre and Sidon, and when such mighty conquerors as Thothmes III. and Rameses II. could claim dominion and levy tribute from the nations from the banks of the Euphrates to the borders of the Libyan desert. Second, this was followed by a short period of independence, when the Jewish nation in the south was growing in power, until it reached its early zenith in the golden days of Solomon; and when Tyre and Sidon were rich cities, sending their traders far and wide, over land and sea, as missionaries of civilization, while in the north the confederate tribes of the Hittites held back the armies of the kings of Assyria. The third, and to us most interesting, period is that during which the kings of Assyria were dominant over the plains of Syria; when Tyre, Sidon, Ashdod, and Jerusalem bowed beneath the conquering armies of Shalmaneser, Sargon, and Sennacherib; and when at last Memphis and Thebes yielded to the power of the rulers of Nineveh and Babylon, and the kings of Assyria completed with terrible fulness the bruising of the reed of Egypt so clearly foretold by the Hebrew prophets.", Boscawen.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Syria/

Syria in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Septuagint Greek for Hebrew 'Aram, fifth of Shem's sons. Aram means the high land N.E. of the Holy Land, extending from the Jordan and the sea of Galilee to the Euphrates; the term means "high". In Genesis Aram-Naharaim, i.e. "Aram between the two rivers", is Mesopotamia, part of which is Padan Aram; and Laban who lived there is called the Aramaean or Syrian. Syria is by some derived from Assyria, by others from Tyre, as if Tsyria; by Ritter from Shur, the wilderness into which Israel passed out of Egypt (Genesis 25:18; Exodus 15:22; 1 Samuel 27:8), from whence the name was extended over all Syria. The Hebrew Aram begins on the northern border of Israel, and thence goes northward to Mount Taurus, westward to the Mediterranean, eastward to the Khabour river. Divided into Aram or Syria of Damascus, Aram or Syria of Zobah (the tract between Euphrates and Coelosyria), Aram or Syria Naharaim ('of the two rivers"), i.e. Padan Aram or Mesopotamia, the N.W. part of the land between the Tigris and Euphrates. On the W. two mountain chains run parallel to one another and to the coast from the latitude of Tyre to that of Antioch, namely, Lebanon and Antilebanon; Lebanon the western chain at its southern end becomes Bargylus. Mount Amanus, an offshoot of Taurus, meets the two long chains at their northern extremity, and separates Syria from Cilicia. The valley between Lebanon and Antilebanon is the most fertile in Syria, extending 230 miles, and in width from 8 to 20 miles. The southern portion is Coelosyria and Hamath. The Litany in this valley (el Bukaa) flows to the S.W.; the Orontes (nahr el Asi, i.e. "the rebel stream") flows to the N. and N.E. for 200 miles; the Barada of Damascus is another river of Syria. The Syrian desert is E. of the inner chain of mountains, and S. of Aleppo; it contains the oasis of Palmyra, and toward its western side the productive plain of Damascus. The chief towns were Antioch, Damascus, Tadmor or Palmyra, Laodicea, Hamath (Epiphaneia), Hierapolis, Heliopolis or Baalbek in Coelosyria, Chalybon or Aleppo, Apamea, and Emesa. Hamites, as the Hittites (the Khatti in the monuments), first occupied Syria. Then a Shemite element entered from the S.E., e.g. Abraham, Chedorlaomer, Amraphel. In early times Syria was divided among many petty "kings," as Damascus, Rehob, Maacah, Zobah, Geshur, etc. 1 Kings 10:29, "kings of Syria"; 2 Kings 7:6, "kings of the Hittites." Joshua fought with the chiefs of the region of Lebanon and Hermon (Joshua 11:2-18). David conquered...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Syria/

Syria Scripture - Judges 10:6

And the children of Israel did evil again in the sight of the LORD, and served Baalim, and Ashtaroth, and the gods of Syria, and the gods of Zidon, and the gods of Moab, and the gods of the children of Ammon, and the gods of the Philistines, and forsook the LORD, and served not him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/10/

Syria Scripture - 2 Chronicles 28:5

Wherefore the LORD his God delivered him into the hand of the king of Syria; and they smote him, and carried away a great multitude of them captives, and brought [them] to Damascus. And he was also delivered into the hand of the king of Israel, who smote him with a great slaughter.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/28/

Syria Scripture - 2 Kings 12:18

And Jehoash king of Judah took all the hallowed things that Jehoshaphat, and Jehoram, and Ahaziah, his fathers, kings of Judah, had dedicated, and his own hallowed things, and all the gold [that was] found in the treasures of the house of the LORD, and in the king's house, and sent [it] to Hazael king of Syria: and he went away from Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/12/

Syria Scripture - 2 Kings 8:29

And king Joram went back to be healed in Jezreel of the wounds which the Syrians had given him at Ramah, when he fought against Hazael king of Syria. And Ahaziah the son of Jehoram king of Judah went down to see Joram the son of Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/8/

Syria Scripture - 2 Kings 13:17

And he said, Open the window eastward. And he opened [it]. Then Elisha said, Shoot. And he shot. And he said, The arrow of the LORD'S deliverance, and the arrow of deliverance from Syria: for thou shalt smite the Syrians in Aphek, till thou have consumed [them].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/13/

Syria Scripture - 1 Kings 15:18

Then Asa took all the silver and the gold [that were] left in the treasures of the house of the LORD, and the treasures of the king's house, and delivered them into the hand of his servants: and king Asa sent them to Benhadad, the son of Tabrimon, the son of Hezion, king of Syria, that dwelt at Damascus, saying,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/15/

Syria Scripture - 2 Chronicles 1:17

And they fetched up, and brought forth out of Egypt a chariot for six hundred [shekels] of silver, and an horse for an hundred and fifty: and so brought they out [horses] for all the kings of the Hittites, and for the kings of Syria, by their means.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/1/

Syria Scripture - 2 Chronicles 22:6

And he returned to be healed in Jezreel because of the wounds which were given him at Ramah, when he fought with Hazael king of Syria. And Azariah the son of Jehoram king of Judah went down to see Jehoram the son of Ahab at Jezreel, because he was sick.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/22/

Syria Scripture - 2 Kings 16:7

So Ahaz sent messengers to Tiglathpileser king of Assyria, saying, I [am] thy servant and thy son: come up, and save me out of the hand of the king of Syria, and out of the hand of the king of Israel, which rise up against me.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/16/

Syria Scripture - 2 Kings 9:15

But king Joram was returned to be healed in Jezreel of the wounds which the Syrians had given him, when he fought with Hazael king of Syria.) And Jehu said, If it be your minds, [then] let none go forth [nor] escape out of the city to go to tell [it] in Jezreel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/9/

Tahpanhes in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ta'-pan-hez, ta-pan'-hez (usually in the Old Testament tachpanchec; Septuagint Taphnas; Coptic, Taphnes): The various spellings of the Hebrew text are fairly well indicated in the King James Version by Tahapanes (Jer 2:16); Tahpanhes (Jer 43:7-9; 44:1; 46:14); Tehaphnehes (Ezek 30:18), while an Egyptian queen (XXIst Dynasty) is named Tahpenes (1 Ki 11:19,20). Tahpanhes was a city on the eastern frontier of Lower Egypt, represented today by Tell Defenneh, a desert mound lying some 20 miles Southwest from Pelusium (Biblical "Sin") and a little North of the modern Al-Kantarah ("the bridge"), marking the old caravan route from Egypt to Israel, Mesopotamia and Assyria. Its Egyptian name is unknown, but it was called Daphnai, by the Greeks, and by the modern Arabs Def'neh. The site is now desolate, but it was a fertile district when watered by the Pelusiac branch of the Nile (compare Isa 19:6,7). Tahpanhes was so powerful that Jeremiah can say that it, with Memphis, has "broken the crown" of Israel's head (2:16), and Ezekiel can speak of its "daughters" (colonies or suburban towns), and names it with Heliopolis and Bubastis when the "yokes Septuagint "sceptres") of Egypt" shall be broken by Yahweh (30:18). In a later passage Jeremiah describes the flight of the Jews from their ruined capital to Tahpanhes after the death of Gedaliah (43:1-7) and prophesies that Nebuchadnezzar shall invade Egypt and punish it, establishing his throne upon the brick pavement (the King James Version "kiln") which is at the entry of Pharaoh's royal palace at Tahpanhes (Jer 43:8-11). He calls Tahpanhes as a witness to the desolation of the cities of Judah (Jer 44:1), but prophesies an equal destruction of Tahpanhes and other Egyptian cities (probably occupied by fugitive Jews) when Nebuchadnezzar shall smite them (Jer 46:14). This invasion of Egypt by Nebuchadnezzar was for a long time strenuously denied (e.g. as late as 1889 by Kuenen, Historisch-critisch Onderzoek, 265-318); but since the discovery and publication (1878) of fragments of Nebuchadnezzar's annals in which he affirms his invasion of Egypt in his 37th year (568-567 BC), most scholars have agreed that the predictions of Jeremiah (43:9-13; 44:30) uttered shortly after 586 BC and of Ezekiel (29:19) uttered in 570 BC were fulfilled, "at least in their general sense" (Driver, Authority and Archaeology, 116). Three cuneiform inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar were found by Arabs probably on or near this site. The excavation of Tahpanhes in 1886 by W. M. Flinders Petrie made it "highly probable that the large oblong platform of brickwork close to the palace fort built at this spot by Psammetichus I, circa 664 BC, and now called Kasr Bint el-Yehudi, `the castle of the Jew's daughter,' is identical...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TAHPANHES/

Tahpanhes in Naves Topical Bible

Also called TAHAPANES and TEHAPHNEHES -A city in Egypt Jer 2:16; 43:7-9; 44:1; 46:14; Eze 30:18

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TAHPANHES/

Tahapanes in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a city of Egypt, mentioned in the time of the prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel. The name is evidently Egyptian, and closely resembles that of the Egyptian queen Tahpenes. It was evidently a town of lower Egypt, near or on the eastern border. When Johanan and the other captains went into Egypt "they came to Tahpanhes." Jer 43:7 The Jews in Jeremiah's time remained here. Jer 44:1 It was an important town, being twice mentioned by the latter prophet with Noph or Memphis. Jer 2:16; 46:14 Here stood a house of Pharaoh-hophra before which Jeremiah hid great stones. Jer 43:8-10

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tahpanhes,+Tehaphnehes,+Tahapanes/

Tahapanes in Easton's Bible Dictionary

=Tahpanhes=Tehaphnehes, (called "Daphne" by the Greeks, now Tell Defenneh), an ancient Egyptian city, on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, about 16 miles from Pelusium. The Jews from Jerusalem fled to this place after the death of Gedaliah (q.v.), and settled there for a time (Jer. 2:16; 43:7; 44:1; 46:14). A platform of brick-work, which there is every reason to believe was the pavement at the entry of Pharaoh's palace, has been discovered at this place. "Here," says the discoverer, Mr. Petrie, "the ceremony described by Jeremiah [43:8- 10; "brick-kiln", i.e., pavement of brick] took place before the chiefs of the fugitives assembled on the platform, and here Nebuchadnezzar spread his royal pavilion" (R.V., "brickwork").

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tahapanes/

Tahpanhes in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, in Lower Egypt, called by the Greeks Daphne. On the N.E. border, near Pelusium, of which it was the outpost; therefore soon reached from Israel by Johanan (Jeremiah 43:7; Jeremiah 43:9). Pharaoh had there a "palace" being built or repaired in the prophet's time, with bricks made of clay in a "brick kiln" at the entry. Of the same materials, Jeremiah foretells, should the substructure of Nebuchadnezzar's throne be built, implying that Nebuchadnezzar's throne should be raised on the downfall of Pharaoh's throne: Jeremiah 46:14, "publish in Migdol (E.) ... Noph (S.), ... T." (W.); here Jews were dwelling (Jeremiah 44:1). In Isaiah 30:4 it is "Hanes" by contraction. In Jeremiah 2:16 "the children of Noph (Memphis, the capital) and Tahapanes" (with which the Jews came most in contact) represent the Egyptians generally, who under Pharaoh Necho slew the king of Judah, Josiah, at Megiddo, and deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim or Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Kings 23:33-35). Called from the goddess Tphnet. Now Tel Defenneh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tahpanhes/

Tahapanes Scripture - Jeremiah 2:16

Also the children of Noph and Tahapanes have broken the crown of thy head.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/2/

Tarshish in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

tar'-shish (tarshish): (1) Eponym of a Benjamite family (1 Ch 7:10); Rhamessai, A and Lucian, Tharseis (2) One of the "seven princes" at the court of Ahasuerus (Est 1:14 Massoretic Text). (3) The Hebrew name of a precious stone (Ezek 10:9 margin, English Versions of the Bible "beryl"; Ex 28:20; 39:13; Ezek 1:16; 28:13; Song 5:14; Dan 10:6). See STONES, PRECIOUS.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TARSHISH/

Tarshish in Naves Topical Bible

1. Son of Javan Ge 10:4; 1Ch 1:7 -2. Also called THARSHISH Probably Spain Ge 10:4,5; Ps 72:10; Isa 66:19 Solomon makes valuable imports from 1Ki 10:22; 2Ch 9:21 Commerce and wealth of 1Ki 10:22; 22:48; 2Ch 9:21; 20:36; Ps 48:7; Isa 2:16; 23:1-14; 60:9; Jer 10:9; Eze 27:12,25; 38:13 Jonah would flee to Jon 1:3; 4:2 Prophecies concerning Ps 72:10; Isa 2:16; 23:1-14; 60:9; 66:19 -3. Son of Bilhan 1Ch 7:10 -4. A Persian prince Es 1:14

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TARSHISH/

Tarshish in Smiths Bible Dictionary

established). 1. Probably Tartessus, a city and emporium of the Phoenicians in the south of Spain, represented as one of the sons of Javan. Ge 10:4; 1Ki 10:22; 1Ch 1:7; Ps 48:7; Isa 2:16; Jer 10:9; Eze 27:12,25; Jon 1:3; 4:2 The identity of the two places is rendered highly probable by the following circumstances: 1st. There is a very close similarity of name between them, Tartessus being merely Tarshish in the Aramaic form. 2nd. There seems to have been a special relation between Tarshish and Tyre, as there was at one time between Tartessus and Phoenicians. 3rd. The articles which Tarshish is stated by the prophet Ezekiel, Eze 27:12 to have supplied to Tyre are precisely such as we know, through classical writers, to have been productions of the Spanish peninsula. In regard to tin, the trade of Tarshish in this metal is peculiarly significant, and, taken in conjunction with similarity of name and other circumstances already mentioned, is reasonably conclusive as to its identity with Tartessus. For even not when countries in Europe or on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea where tin is found are very few; and in reference to ancient times, it would be difficult to name any such countries except Iberia or Spain, Lusitania, which was somewhat less in extent than Portugal, and Cornwall in Great Britain. In the absence of positive proof, we may acquiesce in the statement of Strabo, that the river Baetis (now the Guadalquivir) was formerly called Tartessus, that the city Tartessus was situated between the two arms by which the river flowed into the sea, and that the adjoining country was called Tartessis. 2. From the book of Chronicles there would seem to have been a Tarshish accessible from the Red Sea, in addition to the Tarshish of the south of Spain. Thus, with regard to the ships of Tarshish, which Jehoshaphat caused to be constructed at Ezion-geber on the Elanitic Gulf of the Red Sea, 1Ki 22:48 it is said in the Chronicles, 2Ch 20:36 that they were made to go to Tarshish; and in like manner the navy of ships, which Solomon had previously made in Ezion-geber, 1Ki 9:26 is said in the Chronicles, 2Ch 9:21 to have gone to Tarshish with the servants of Hiram. It is not to be supposed that the author of these passages in the Chronicles contemplated a voyage to Tarshish in the south of Spain by going round what has since been called the Cape of Good Hope. The expression "ships of Tarshish" originally meant ships destined to go to Tarshish; and then probably came to signify large Phoenician ships, of a particular size the description, destined for long voyages, just as in English "East Indiaman" was a general name given to vessels, some of which were not intended to go to India at all. Hence we may infer that the word Tarshish was also used to signify any distant place, and in this case would be applied to one in the Indian Ocean. This is shown by the nature of the imports with which the fleet returned, which are specified as "gold, silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks." 1Ki 10:22 The gold might possibly have been obtained form Africa, or from Ophir in Arabia, and the ivory and the apes might likewise have been imported from Africa; but the peacocks point conclusively, not to Africa, but to India. There are only two species known: both inhabit the mainland and islands of India; so that the mention of the peacock seems to exclude the possibility of the voyage having been to Africa.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tarshish/

Tarshish in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a Sanscrit or Aryan word, meaning "the sea coast." (1.) One of the "sons" of Javan (Gen. 10:4; 1 Chr. 1:7). (2.) The name of a place which first comes into notice in the days of Solomon. The question as to the locality of Tarshish has given rise to not a little discussion. Some think there was a Tarshish in the East, on the Indian coast, seeing that "ships of Tarshish" sailed from Eziongeber, on the Red Sea (1 Kings 9:26; 22:48; 2 Chr. 9:21). Some, again, argue that Carthage was the place so named. There can be little doubt, however, that this is the name of a Phoenician port in Spain, between the two mouths of the Guadalquivir (the name given to the river by the Arabs, and meaning "the great wady" or water-course). It was founded by a Carthaginian colony, and was the farthest western harbour of Tyrian sailors. It was to this port Jonah's ship was about to sail from Joppa. It has well been styled "the Peru of Tyrian adventure;" it abounded in gold and silver mines. It appears that this name also is used without reference to any locality. "Ships of Tarshish" is an expression sometimes denoting simply ships intended for a long voyage (Isa. 23:1, 14), ships of a large size (sea-going ships), whatever might be the port to which they sailed. Solomon's ships were so styled (1 Kings 10:22; 22:49).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tarshish/

Tarshish in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Tartessus (as Asshur became Athur, Bashan, Batanoea), a Phoenician city S. of Spain; the portion of Spain known to the Hebrew (Psalm 72:10). "The kings of Tarshish ... kings of Sheba," i.e. the wealthy Tarshish in the far W. and Sheba in the S.E. Tarshish was a dependency of Phoenician Tyre. Isaiah 23:6; Isaiah 23:10 ("pass through thy land as a river, O daughter of Tarshish," i.e. Tartessus and its inhabitants would now that Tyre's strength was disabled pour forth as waters, no longer kept working mines for the parent city), 14,18; Ezekiel 26:15; Ezekiel 26:18; Ezekiel 27:12. "Tarshish was thy (Tyre's) merchant ... with silver, iron, tin, and lead, they traded in thy fairs." Tarshish was famed for various metals exported to Tyre; most of them were drawn from Spain and Portugal, tin possibly from Cornwall or from Lusitania or Portugal. "Ships of Tarshish" are mentioned often: Psalm 48:7, "Thou brakest the ships of Tarshish with an east wind," alluding with undesigned coincidence to the event recorded 2 Chronicles 20:36-37; "Jehoshaphat joined himself with Ahaziah king of Israel to make ships to go to Tarshish ... in Ezion Gaber ... because ... the Lord hath broken thy works," i.e. wrecked thy ships. The ships of Tarshish built at Ezion Geber on the Elanitic gulf of the Red Sea (1 Kings 22:48) were intended by Jehoshaphat to trade with Africa and India; but a copyist in 2 Chronicles 20:36 makes them go to Tarshish. It is possible they were carried across the land to the Mediterranean, but more likely that "ships of Tarshish" mean large vessels, as our phrase "East Indiamen" does not imply the destination but the size; the copyist mistook the phrase for the destination. So in 1 Kings 9:26; 1 Kings 10:22; 2 Chronicles 9:21; the "peacocks" point to India, for southern Asia and the isles of the eastern archipelago are their native home. The names too are of Sanskrit etymology, tukki, related to Tamil Iota, "the tailed bird," i.e. peacock. So "apes," kaph, related to Sanskrit kapi. The Greeks received the peacock from Persia, as the Greek taos is the Persian tans. Strabo makes the Boetis or Guadalquivir (great stream) be called Tartessus. An island, a town, and a region bore the name. (On Genesis 10:4, which Rawlinson refers to Tarsus, at the close.) (See TARSUS.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tarshish/

Tarshish in Hitchcock's Bible Names

contemplation; examination

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tarshish/

Tarshish Scripture - Ezekiel 38:13

Sheba, and Dedan, and the merchants of Tarshish, with all the young lions thereof, shall say unto thee, Art thou come to take a spoil? hast thou gathered thy company to take a prey? to carry away silver and gold, to take away cattle and goods, to take a great spoil?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/38/

Tarshish Scripture - Jonah 4:2

And he prayed unto the LORD, and said, I pray thee, O LORD, [was] not this my saying, when I was yet in my country? Therefore I fled before unto Tarshish: for I knew that thou [art] a gracious God, and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repentest thee of the evil.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/4/

Tarshish Scripture - 2 Chronicles 20:37

Then Eliezer the son of Dodavah of Mareshah prophesied against Jehoshaphat, saying, Because thou hast joined thyself with Ahaziah, the LORD hath broken thy works. And the ships were broken, that they were not able to go to Tarshish.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/20/

Tarshish Scripture - Isaiah 66:19

And I will set a sign among them, and I will send those that escape of them unto the nations, [to] Tarshish, Pul, and Lud, that draw the bow, [to] Tubal, and Javan, [to] the isles afar off, that have not heard my fame, neither have seen my glory; and they shall declare my glory among the Gentiles.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/66/

Tarshish Scripture - Jeremiah 10:9

Silver spread into plates is brought from Tarshish, and gold from Uphaz, the work of the workman, and of the hands of the founder: blue and purple [is] their clothing: they [are] all the work of cunning [men].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/10/

Tarshish Scripture - 2 Chronicles 20:36

And he joined himself with him to make ships to go to Tarshish: and they made the ships in Eziongeber.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/20/

Tarshish Scripture - Psalms 72:10

The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents: the kings of Sheba and Seba shall offer gifts.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/72/

Tarshish Scripture - Isaiah 60:9

Surely the isles shall wait for me, and the ships of Tarshish first, to bring thy sons from far, their silver and their gold with them, unto the name of the LORD thy God, and to the Holy One of Israel, because he hath glorified thee.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/60/

Tarshish Scripture - Esther 1:14

And the next unto him [was] Carshena, Shethar, Admatha, Tarshish, Meres, Marsena, [and] Memucan, the seven princes of Persia and Media, which saw the king's face, [and] which sat the first in the kingdom;)

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/1/

Tarshish Scripture - Isaiah 23:1

The burden of Tyre. Howl, ye ships of Tarshish; for it is laid waste, so that there is no house, no entering in: from the land of Chittim it is revealed to them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/23/

Tarsus in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

tar'-sus (Tarsos, ethnic Tarseus) : 1. Situation 2. Foundation Legends 3. Tarsus under Oriental Power 4. Tarsus under Greek Sway 5. Tarsus in the Roman Empire 6. The University 7. The Tarsian Constitution 8. Paul of Tarsus 9. Later History LITERATURE 1. Situation: The chief city of Cilicia, the southeastern portion of Asia Minor. It lay on both banks of the river Cydnus, in the midst of a fertile alluvial plain, some 10 miles from the seacoast. About 6 miles below the city the river broadened out into a considerable lake called Rhegma (Strabo xiv.672), which afforded a safe anchorage and was in great part fringed with quays and dockyards. The river itself, which flowed southward from the Taurus Mountains with a clear and swift stream, was navigable to light craft, and Cleopatra, when she visited Antony at Tarsus in 38 BC, was able to sail in her richly decorated barge into the very heart of the city (Plut. Ant. 26). The silting-up of the river's mouth seems to have resulted in frequent floods, against which the emperor Justinian (527-65 AD) attempted to provide by cutting a new channel, starting a short distance North of the city, to divert the surplus water into a watercourse which lay to the East of Tarsus. Gradually, however, the original bed was allowed to become choked, and now the Cydnus flows wholly through Justinian's channel and passes to the East of the modern town. Two miles North of Tarsus the plain gives way to low, undulating hills, which extend to the foothills of Taurus, the great mountain chain lying some 30 miles North of the city, which divides Cilicia from Lycaonia and Cappadocia. The actual frontier-line seems to have varied at different periods, but the natural boundary lies at the Cilician Gates, a narrow gorge which Tarsian enterprise and engineering skill had widened so as to make it a wagon road, the chief highway of communication and trade between Cilicia and the interior of Asia Minor and one of the most decisive factors in Anatolian history. Eastward from Tarsus ran an important road crossing the Sarus at Adana and the Pyramus at Mopsuestia; there it divided, one branch running southeastward by way of Issus to Antioch on the Orontes, while another turned slightly northward to Castabala, and thence ran due East to the passage of the Euphrates at Zeugma. Thus the fertility of its soil, the safety and convenience of its harbor and the command of the main line of communication between Anatolia and Syria or Mesopotamia combined to promote the greatness of Tarsus, though its position...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TARSUS/

Tarsus in Naves Topical Bible

(The capitol of Cilicia in Asia Minor) -Paul's birthplace Ac 9:11; 21:39; 22:3 -Paul sent to, from Jerusalem, to avoid assassination Ac 9:30 -Paul brought from, by Barnabas Ac 11:25,26

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TARSUS/

Tarsus in Smiths Bible Dictionary

the chief town of Cilicia, "no mean city" in other respects, but illustrious to all time as the birthplace and early residence of the apostle Paul. Ac 9:11; 21:39; 22:3 Even in the flourishing period of Greek history it was a city of some considerable consequence. In the civil wars of Rome it took Caesar's aide, sad on the occasion of a visit from him had its name changed to Juliopolis. Augustus made it a "free city." It was renowned as a place of education under the early Roman emperors. Strabo compares it in this respect to Athens unto Alexandria. Tarsus also was a place of much commerce. It was situated in a wild and fertile plain on the banks of the Cydnus. No ruins of any importance remain.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tarsus/

Tarsus in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the chief city of Cilicia. It was distinguished for its wealth and for its schools of learning, in which it rivalled, nay, excelled even Athens and Alexandria, and hence was spoken of as "no mean city." It was the native place of the Apostle Paul (Acts 21:39). It stood on the banks of the river Cydnus, about 12 miles north of the Mediterranean. It is said to have been founded by Sardanapalus, king of Assyria. It is now a filthy, ruinous Turkish town, called Tersous. (See PAUL -T0002871.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tarsus/

Tarsus in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Acts 9:11; Acts 22:3; Acts 21:39. Paul's birthplace and early residence. Capital of Cilicia, in a plain on the river Cydnus at the foot of the passes northward over Mount Taurus into Cappadocia and Lycaonia. Through these passes a road led to Lystra and Iconium (Acts 14), another road by the Amanian and Syrian gates eastward to Antioch. Founded by Sennacherub of Assyria; the Greeks too took part in its colonisation (Strabo xiv. 673), Xenophon mentions it (Tarsoi in the Ariabasis). Julius Caesar rewarded Tarsus for fidelity, and Augustus made it a free city, i.e. governed by its own laws and magistrates and free from tribute, but without Roman citizenship, which Paul must have acquired in some other way. Ranked by Strabo above Athens and Alexandria for its school of literature and philosophy; Athenodorus, Augustus' tutor, the grammarians Artemidorus and Diodorus, and the tragedian Dionysides belonged to Tarsus. Here Paul received providentially that training which adapted him for dealing with the polished Greeks on their own ground, quoting Aratus a Cilician poet, Epimenides a Cretan, and Menander the Athenian comedian. He resided in Tarsus at intervals after his conversion (Acts 9:30; Acts 11:25); after his first visit to Jerusalem and before his ministry with Barnabas at Antioch, and doubtless at the commencement of his second and third missionary journeys (Acts 15:41; Acts 18:23). G. Rawlinson thinks Tarshish in Genesis 10:4 can scarcely designate Tartessus, founded not until after Moses, but Tarsus in Cilicia; though said to be founded by Sennacherib, an old settlement doubtless preceded his colony. Thus, Tarshish in Genesis 10:4 will represent the Cilicians or the Greeks in Cilicia; it is associated with Kittim or Cyprus, which was near.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tarsus/

Sidon Scripture - Luke 10:13

Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/10/

Sidon Scripture - Matthew 11:21

Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/11/

Sidon Scripture - Mark 3:8

And from Jerusalem, and from Idumaea, and [from] beyond Jordan; and they about Tyre and Sidon, a great multitude, when they had heard what great things he did, came unto him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/3/

Sidon Scripture - Mark 7:31

And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/7/

Sidon Scripture - Luke 6:17

And he came down with them, and stood in the plain, and the company of his disciples, and a great multitude of people out of all Judaea and Jerusalem, and from the sea coast of Tyre and Sidon, which came to hear him, and to be healed of their diseases;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/6/

Sidon Scripture - Acts 27:3

And the next [day] we touched at Sidon. And Julius courteously entreated Paul, and gave [him] liberty to go unto his friends to refresh himself.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/27/

Sidon Scripture - Luke 4:26

But unto none of them was Elias sent, save unto Sarepta, [a city] of Sidon, unto a woman [that was] a widow.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/4/

Sidon Scripture - Mark 7:24

And from thence he arose, and went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and entered into an house, and would have no man know [it]: but he could not be hid.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/7/

Sidon Scripture - Genesis 10:15

And Canaan begat Sidon his firstborn, and Heth,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Sidon Scripture - Matthew 15:21

Then Jesus went thence, and departed into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/15/

Sidon Scripture - Matthew 11:22

But I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the day of judgment, than for you.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/11/

Sidon Scripture - Luke 10:14

But it shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the judgment, than for you.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/10/

Siloam in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

si-lo'-am, si-lo'-am, si-lo'-a, she'-la, shi-lo'-a: (1) me ha-shiloach (shiloach or shilloach is a passive form and means "sent" or "conducted") "the waters of (the) Shiloah" (Isa 8:6). (2) berekhath ha-shelach, "the pool of (the) Shelah" (the King James Version "Siloah") (Neh 3:15). (3) ten kolumbethran tou (or ton) Siloam, "the pool of Siloam" (Jn 9:7). (4) ho purgos en to Siloam, "the tower in Siloam" (Lk 13:4). 1. The Modern Silwan: Although the name is chiefly used in the Old Testament and Josephus as the name of certain "waters," the surviving name today, Silwan, is that of a fairly prosperous village which extends along the steep east side of the Kidron valley from a little North of the "Virgin's Fountain" as far as Bir Eyyub. The greater part of the village, the older and better built section, belongs to Moslem fellahin who cultivate the well-watered gardens in the valley and on the hill slopes opposite, but a southern part has recently been built in an extremely primitive manner by Yemen Jews, immigrants from South Arabia, and still farther South, in the commencement of the Wady en Nar, is the wretched settlement of the lepers. How long the site of Silwan has been occupied it is impossible to say. The village is mentioned in the 10th century by the Arab writer Muqaddasi. The numerous rock cuttings, steps, houses, caves, etc., some of which have at times served as chapels, show that the site has been much inhabited in the past, and at one period at least by hermits. The mention of "those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them" (Lk 13:4) certainly suggests that there was a settlement there in New Testament times, although some writers consider that this may have reference to some tower on the city walls near the Pool of Siloam. 2. The Siloam Aqueduct: Opposite to the main part of Silwan is the "Virgin's Fount," ancient GIHON (which see), whose waters are practically monopolized by the villagers. It is the waters of this spring which are referred to in Isa 8:5,6: "Forasmuch as this people have refused the waters of Shiloah that go softly, .... now therefore, behold, the Lord bringeth up upon them the waters of the River." The contrast between the little stream flowing from the Gihon and the great Euphrates is used as a figure of the vast difference between the apparent strength of the little kingdom of Judah and the House of David on the one hand, and the might of "Rezin and Remaliah's son" and "all his glory." Although it is quite probable that in those days there was an open streamlet in the valley, yet the meaning of Shiloah, "sent" or "conducted," rather...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SILOAM;+SILOAH;+SHELAH;+SHILOAH/

Siloam in Naves Topical Bible

Also called SHILOAH and SILOAH -A pool in Jerusalem Ne 3:15; Isa 8:6 -Jesus directs the blind man whom he had healed to wash in Joh 9:1-11 -Tower of, in the wall of Jerusalem, falls and kills eighteen people Lu 13:4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SILOAM/

Siloam in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(sent). Shiloach, Isa 8:6 Siloah, Ne 3:15 Siloam, Joh 9:11 Siloam is one of the few undisputed localities in the topography of Jerusalem; still retaining its old name (with Arabic modification, Silwan), while every other pool has lost its Bible designation. This is the more remarkable as it is a mere suburban tank of no great size, and for many an age not particularly good or plentiful in its waters, though Josephus tells us that in his day they were both "sweet and abundant." A little way below the Jewish burying-ground, but on the opposite side of the valley, where the Kedron turns slightly westward and widens itself considerable, is the fountain of the Virgin, or Um'ed'Deraj, near the beginning of that saddle-shaped projection of the temple hill supposed to be the Ophel of The Bible and the Ophlas of Josephus. At the back part of this fountain a subterraneous passage begins, through which the water flows, and through which a man may make his way, sometimes walking erect, sometimes stooping, sometimes kneeling, and sometime crawling, to Siloam. This conduit is 1708 feet long, 16 feet high at the entrance, but only 16 inches at its narrowest tributaries which sent their waters down from the city pools or temple wells to swell Siloam. It enters Siloam at the northwest angle; or rather enters a small rock-cut chamber which forms the vestibule of Siloam, about five or six feet broad. To this you descend by a few rude steps, under which the water pours itself into the main pool. This pool is oblong, about 52 feet long, 18 feet broad and 19 feet deep; but it is never filled, the water either passing directly through or being maintained at a depth of three or four feet. The present pool is a ruin, with no moss or ivy to make it romantic; its sides fallen in; its pillars broken; its stair a fragment; its walls giving way; the edge of every stone was round or sharp by time; in some parts mere debris, though around its edges wild flowers, and among other plants the caper trees, grow luxuriantly. The present pool is not the original building; it may be the work of crusaders, perhaps even improved by Saladin, whose affection for wells and pools led him to care for all these things. Yet the spot is the same. This pool, which we may call the second, seems anciently to have poured its waters into a third before it proceeded to water the royal gardens. This third is perhaps that which Josephus calls "Solomon's pool," and which nehemiah calls the "king's pool." Ne 2:14 The expression in Isa 8:6 "waters of Shiloah that go softly," seems to point to the slender rivulet, flowing gently though once very profusely out of Siloam into the lower breadth of level where the king's gardens, or royal paradise, stood, and which is still the greenest spot about the holy city. Siloam is a mere spot even to the Moslem; much more to the Jew. It was to Siloam that the Levite was sent with the golden pitcher on the "last and great day of the feast" of Tabernacles; it was from Siloam that he brought the water which was then poured over the sacrifice, in memory of the water from the rock of Rephidim; and it was to this Siloam water that the Lord pointed when he stood in the temple on that day and cried, "If any man thirst let him come unto me and drink." The Lord sent the blind man to wash, not in, as our version has it, but at (eis), the pool of siloam; for it was the clay from his eyes that was to be washed off.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Siloam/

Pool of Siloam in Easton's Bible Dictionary

sent or sending. Here a notable miracle was wrought by our Lord in giving sight to the blind (John 9:7-11). It has been identified with the Birket Silwan in the lower Tyropoeon valley, to the south-east of the hill of Zion. The water which flows into this pool intermittingly by a subterranean channel springs from the "Fountain of the Virgin" (q.v.). The length of this channel, which has several windings, is 1,750 feet, though the direct distance is only 1,100 feet. The pool is 53 feet in length from north to south, 18 feet wide, and 19 deep. The water passes from it by a channel cut in the rock into the gardens below. (See EN-ROGEL -T0001214.) Many years ago (1880) a youth, while wading up the conduit by which the water enters the pool, accidentally discovered an inscription cut in the rock, on the eastern side, about 19 feet from the pool. This is the oldest extant Hebrew record of the kind. It has with great care been deciphered by scholars, and has been found to be an account of the manner in which the tunnel was constructed. Its whole length is said to be "twelve hundred cubits;" and the inscription further notes that the workmen, like the excavators of the Mont Cenis Tunnel, excavated from both ends, meeting in the middle. Some have argued that the inscription was cut in the time of Solomon; others, with more probability, refer it to the reign of Hezekiah. A more ancient tunnel was discovered in 1889 some 20 feet below the ground. It is of smaller dimensions, but more direct in its course. It is to this tunnel that Isaiah (8:6) probably refers. The Siloam inscription above referred to was surreptitiously cut from the wall of the tunnel in 1891 and broken into fragments. These were, however, recovered by the efforts of the British Consul at Jerusalem, and have been restored to their original place.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Siloam,+Pool+of/

Pool of Siloam in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Shelach in Nehemiah 3:15, KJV "Siloah," "Shiloah" (Isaiah 8:16), Siloam (John 9:7; John 9:11). Now Silwan. Every other pool has lost its Bible designation. Siloam, a small suburban tank, alone retains it. It is a regularly built pool or tank (bereekah) near the fountain gate, the stairs that go down from the city of David (S. of the temple mountain), the wall above the house of David, the water gate, and the king's garden (compare Nehemiah 12:37 with Nehemiah 3:15). Josephus (B. J. 5:9, section 4; 4, section 1; 6, section 1; 12, section 2) places it at the end of the valley of Tyropeon, outside the city wall where the old wall took a bend eastward, and facing the hill on which was the rock Peristereon to the E. The adjoining village Kefr Silwan on the other side of Kedron also retains the name Siloam. Silwan stands at the southern extremity of the temple mountain, known as "the Ophel." It is partly hewn out of the rock, partly built with masonry, measuring 53 ft. long, 18 wide, 19 deep. A flight of steps descends to the bottom. Columns extend along the side walls from top to bottom. The water passes hence by a channel cut in the rock, and covered for a short way, into the gardens below which occupy the site of "the lower pool" or "the king's pool" (Nehemiah 2:14). The fountain of the Virgin above is connected by a zigzag conduit, 1,750 ft. long cut through the rock, with a reservoir, an oblong basin, decreasing. in size as it proceeds from 15 to three feet, in a cave entered by a small rock hewn archway. From this artificial cave at the west end of Siloam an open channel in the rock conveys the water into Siloam. The Virgin's fountain (where the lamp here figured was found), 15 ft. long by six wide at the bottom, is on the opposite side of the valley from the Jewish burying ground where Kedron turns W. It is near the beginning of the projection of the temple hill called "Ophel." It is named now also "the fountain of the mother of steps" ('Ayin 'um 'ed durag), because it is reached by two flights of 26 descending steps cut in the rock. It is a natural syphon, so that at times it is quite dry and in a short time rises beyond its ordinary limits. The term kolumbeethra in John 9:7 implies "a pond for swimming." R. Ishmael says of its source, the Virgin's fountain, that there the high priest used to plunge. It was to Siloam that a Levite was sent with the golden pitcher on "the last and great day of the feast" of tabernacles. From Siloam he brought the water to be poured over the sacrifice in memory of the water at Rephidim. To it Jesus alluded when standing in the temple He cried, "if any man thirst let him come unto Me and drink," etc. (John 7:37-39). He "sent" the blind man to wash the clay off his eyes in Siloam, which means "sent," and he returned seeing. Messiah "the sent One" (Luke 4:18; John 10:36) answers to the type Siloam the sent water (Job 5:10; Ezekiel 31:4) that healed; He flows gently, softly, and healing, like Siloam fertilising and beautifying, not turbid as the winter torrent Kedron, nor sweeping destructively all before it as Euphrates (symbol of Assyria), but gliding on in its silent mission of beneficence (Isaiah 8:6; Isaiah 42:1-4; Isaiah 40:11; 2 Corinthians 10:1). Siloam was called so from sending its waters to refresh the gardens below, still the greenest spot about Jerusalem, and abounding in olives, figs, and pomegranates. The water for the ashes of the red heifer also was taken from Siloam (Dach Talm. Babyl. 380). Into Siloam probably Hezekiah led by a subterranean aqueduct down the Tyropoeon valley the waters on the other side of the city when "he stopped the upper watercourse of Gihon and brought it straight down to the W. side of the city of David" (2 Chronicles 32:30).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Siloam,+the+pool+of/

Siloam Scripture - John 9:11

He answered and said, A man that is called Jesus made clay, and anointed mine eyes, and said unto me, Go to the pool of Siloam, and wash: and I went and washed, and I received sight.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/9/

Siloam Scripture - Luke 13:4

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/13/

Siloam Scripture - John 9:7

And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent.) He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/9/

Smyrna in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

smur'-na (Smurna): 1. Ancient: Smyrna, a large ancient city on the western coast of Asia Minor, at the head of a gulf which reaches 30 miles inland, was originally peopled by the Asiatics known as the Lelages. The city seems to have been taken from the Lelages by the Aeolian Greeks about 1100 BC; there still remain traces of the cyclopean masonry of that early time. In 688 BC it passed into the possession of the Ionian Greeks and was made one of the cities of the Ionian confederacy, but in 627 BC it was taken by the Lydians. During the years 301 to 281 BC, Lysimachus entirely rebuilt it on a new site to the Southwest of the earlier cities, and surrounded it by a wall. Standing, as it did, upon a good harbor, at the head of one of the chief highways to the interior, it early became a great trading-center and the chief port for the export trade. In Roman times, Smyrna was considered the most brilliant city of Asia Minor, successfully rivaling Pergamos and Ephesus. Its streets were wide and paved. Its system of coinage was old, and now about the city coins of every period are found. It was celebrated for its schools of science and medicine, and for its handsome buildings. Among them was the Homerium, for Smyrna was one of several places which claimed to be the birthplace of the poet. On the slope of Mt. Pagus was a theater which seated 20,000 spectators. In the 23 AD year a temple was built in honor of Tiberius and his mother Julia, and the Golden Street, connecting the temples of Zeus and Cybele, is said to have been the best in any ancient city. Smyrna early became a Christian city, for there was one of the Seven Churches of the Book of Revelation (2:8-11). There Polycarp, the bishop of Smyrna, was martyred, though without the sanction of the Roman government. It seems that the Jews of Smyrna were more antagonistic than were the Romans to the spread of Christianity, for it is said that even on Saturday, their sacred day, they brought wood for the fire in which Polycarp was burned. His grave is still shown in a cemetery there. Like many other cities of Asia Minor, Smyrna suffered frequently, especially during the years 178-80 AD, from earthquakes, but it always escaped entire destruction. During the Middle Ages the city was the scene of many struggles, the most fierce of which was directed by Timur against the Christians. Tradition relates that there he built a tower, using as stones the heads of a thousand captives which he put to death, yet Smyrna was the last of the Christian cities to hold out against the Mohammedans; in 1424 it fell into the hands of the Turks. It was the discovery of America and the resulting discovery...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SMYRNA/

Smyrna in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Ionia) -One of the seven congregations in Re 1:11; 2:8

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SMYRNA/

Smyrna in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(myrrh), a city of Asia Minor, situated on the AEgean Sea, 40 miles north of Ephesus. Allusion is made to it in Re 2:8- 11 It was founded by Alexander the Great, and was situated twenty shades (2 1/2 miles) from the city of the same name, which after a long series of wars with the Lydians had been finally taken and sacked by Halyattes. The ancient city was built by some piratical Greeks 1500 years before Christ. It seems not impossible that the message to the church in Smyrna contains allusions to the ritual of the pagan mysteries which prevailed in that city. In the time of Strabo the ruins of the old Smyrna still existed, and were partially inhabited, but the new city was one of the most beautiful in all Asia. The streets were laid out as near as might be at right angles. There was a large public library there, and also a handsome building surrounded with porticos which served as a museum. It was consecrated as a heroum to Homer, whom the Smyrnaeans claimed as a countryman. Olympian games were celebrated here, and excited great interest. (Smyrna is still a large city of 180,000 to 200,000 inhabitants, of which a larger proportion are Franks than in any other town in Turkey; 20,000 are Greeks, 9000 Jews, 8000 Armenians, 1000 Europeans, and the rest are Moslems. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Smyrna/

Smyrna in Easton's Bible Dictionary

myrrh, an ancient city of Ionia, on the western coast of Asia Minor, about 40 miles to the north of Ephesus. It is now the chief city of Anatolia, having a mixed population of about 200,000, of whom about one-third are professed Christians. The church founded here was one of the seven addressed by our Lord (Rev. 2:8-11). The celebrated Polycarp, a pupil of the apostle John, was in the second century a prominent leader in the church of Smyrna. Here he suffered martyrdom, A.D. 155.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Smyrna/

Smyrna in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city on the coast of Ionia, at the head of the gulf, having a well sheltered harbour; N. of Ephesus; beautified by Alexander the Great and Antigonus, and designated "the beautiful." Still flourishing, and under the same name, after various vicissitudes, and called "the Paris of the Levant," with large commerce and a population of 200,000. The church here was one of the seven addressed by the Lord (Revelation 2:8-11). Polycarp, martyred in A.D. 168, 86 years after conversion, was its bishop, probably "the angel of the church in Smyrna." The Lord's allusions to persecutions accord with this identification. The attributes of Him "which was dead and is alive" would comfort Smyrna under persecution. The idol Dionysus at Smyrna was believed to have been killed and come to life; in contrast to this lying fable is Christ's title, "the First and the Last, which was dead and is alive" (Revelation 2:8). As death was to Him the gate of life, so it is to His people. Good "works," "tribulation," "poverty" owing to "spoiling of goods," while she was "rich" in grace (contrast Laodicea, "rich" in her own eyes and the world's, poor before God), were her marks. The Jews in name, really "the synagogue of Satan," blasphemed Christ as "the Hanged One." At Polycarp's martyrdom they clamoured with the pagan for his being cast to the lions; the proconsul opposed it, but, impotent to restrain the fanaticism of the mob, let them He him to the stake; the Jews with their own hands carried logs for the pile which burned him. The theater where he was burned was on a hill facing the N. It was one of the largest in Asia. Traces of it may be seen in descending from the northern gateway of the castle. A circular letter from the church of Smyrna describes his martyrdom. When urged to recant he said, "four-score years and six I have served the Lord, and He never wronged me; how then can I blaspheme my King and Saviour?" The accuser, the devil, cast some of the Smyrna church into prison, and "it had tribulation ten days," a short term (Genesis 24:55; Numbers 11:19), whereas the consequent joy is eternal (many Christians perished by wild beasts or at the stake because they refused to throw incense into the fire to sacrifice to the genius of the emperor): a sweet consolation in trial. Ten is the number of the world powers hostile to the church (Revelation 13:1). Christ promises Smyrna "a crown of life" (compare James 1:12; 2 Timothy 4:8 "of righteousness," 1 Peter 5:4 "of glory") in reward for "faithfulness unto death." The allusion is to the "crown-wearing" (stefanofori), leading priests at Smyrna It was usual to present the superintending priest with a crown at the end of his year of office; several persons of both sexes are called "crown bearers" in inscriptions. The ferocity of the populace against the aged Polycarp is accounted for by their zealous interest in the Olympian games celebrated here, in respect to which Christianity bore an antisocial aspect. Smyrna ("myrrh") yielded its perfume in being bruised to death. Smyrna's faithfulness is rewarded by its candlestick not having been wholly removed; from whence the Turks call it "infidel Smyrna." Persecuted Smyrna and Philadelphia are the only churches which the Lord does not reprove. (See PHILADELPHIA.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Smyrna/

Smyrna in Hitchcock's Bible Names

myrrh

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Smyrna/

Smyrna Scripture - Revelation 1:11

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Smyrna Scripture - Revelation 2:8

And unto the angel of the church in Smyrna write; These things saith the first and the last, which was dead, and is alive;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/2/

Sodom in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

sod'-um (cedhom; Sodoma) One of the 5 CITIES OF THE PLAIN (which see), destroyed by fire from heaven in the time of Abraham and Lot (Gen 19:24). The wickedness of the city became proverbial. The sin of sodomy was an offense against nature frequently connected with idolatrous practices (see Rawlinson, History of Phoenicia). See SODOMITE. The fate of Sodom and Gomorrah is used as a warning to those who reject the gospel (Mt 10:15; 11:24; 2 Pet 2:6; Jude 1:7). The word is used in a typical sense in Rev 11:8. Sodom was probably located in plain South of the Dead Sea, now covered with water. The name is still preserved in Jebel Usdum (Mt. Sodom). See ARABAH; CITIES OF THE PLAIN; DEAD SEA.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SODOM/

Sodom in Naves Topical Bible

Also called SODOMA -Situated on the plain of the Jordan River Ge 13:10 -The southeastern limit of the Canaanites Ge 10:19 -Lot lived in Ge 13:12 -King of, joins other kings of the nations resisting the invasion of Chedorlaomer Ge 14:1-12 -Wickedness of the inhabitants of Ge 13:13; 19:4-13; De 32:32; Isa 3:9; Jer 23:14; La 4:6; Eze 16:46,48,49; Jude 1:7 -Abraham's intercession for Ge 18:16-33 -Destroyed on account of the wickedness of the people Ge 19:1-29; De 29:23; Isa 13:19; Jer 49:18; 50:40; La 4:6; Am 4:11; Zep 2:9; Mt 10:15; Lu 17:29; Ro 9:29; 2Pe 2:6 -FIGURATIVE Of wickedness De 23:17; 32:32; Isa 1:10; Eze 16:46-56

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SODOM/

Sodom in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(burning), one of the most ancient cities of Syria. It is commonly mentioned in connection with Gomorrah, but also with Admah and Zeboim, and on one occasion -- Ge 14:1 ... -- with Bela or Zoar. Sodom was evidently the chief town in the settlement. The four are first named in the ethnological records of Ge 10:19 as belonging to the Canaanites. The next mention of the name of Sodom, Ge 13:10-13 gives more certain indication of the position of the city. Abram and Lot are standing together between Bethel and Ai, ver. 3, taking a survey of the land around and below them. Eastward of them, and absolutely at their feet, lay the "circle of Jordan." The whole circle was one great oasis --"a garden of Jehovah." ver. 10. In the midst of the garden the four cities of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboim appear to have been situated. It is necessary to notice how absolutely the cities are identified with the district. In the subsequent account of their destruction, Ge 19:1 ... the topographical terms are employed with all the precision which is characteristic of such early times. The mention of the Jordan is conclusive as to the situation of the district, for the Jordan ceases where it enters the Dead Sea, and can have no existence south of that point. The catastrophe by which they were destroyed is described in Ge 19:1 ... as a shower of brimstone and fire from Jehovah. However we may interpret the words of the earliest narrative, one thing is certain --that the lake was not one of the agents in the catastrophe. From all these passages, though much is obscure, two things seem clear: 1. That Sodom and the rest of the cities of the plain of Jordan stood on the north of the Dead Sea; 2. That neither the cities nor the district were submerged by the lake, but that the cities were overthrown and the land spoiled, and that it may still be seen in its desolate condition. When, however, we turn to more modern views, we discover a remarkable variance from these conclusions. 1. The opinion long current that the five cities were submerged in the lake, and that their remains--walls, columns and capitals--might he still discerned below the water, hardly needs refutation after the distinct statement and the constant implication of Scripture. But, 2. A more serious departure from the terms of the ancient history is exhibited in the prevalent opinion that the cities stood at the south end of the lake. This appears to, have been the belief of Josephus and Jerome. It seems to have been universally held by the medieval historians and pilgrims, and it is adopted by modern topographers probably without exception. There are several grounds for this belief; but the main point on...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sodom/

Sodom in Easton's Bible Dictionary

burning; the walled, a city in the vale of Siddim (Gen. 13:10; 14:1-16). The wickedness of its inhabitants brought down upon it fire from heaven, by which it was destroyed (18:16- 33; 19:1-29; Deut. 23:17). This city and its awful destruction are frequently alluded to in Scripture (Deut. 29:23; 32:32; Isa. 1:9, 10; 3:9; 13:19; Jer. 23:14; Ezek. 16:46-56; Zeph. 2:9; Matt. 10:15; Rom. 9:29; 2 Pet. 2:6, etc.). No trace of it or of the other cities of the plain has been discovered, so complete was their destruction. Just opposite the site of Zoar, on the south-west coast of the Dead Sea, is a range of low hills, forming a mass of mineral salt called Jebel Usdum, "the hill of Sodom." It has been concluded, from this and from other considerations, that the cities of the plain stood at the southern end of the Dead Sea. Others, however, with much greater probability, contend that they stood at the northern end of the sea. [in 1897].

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sodom/

Sodom in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Chief of the group Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim, and Bela or Zoar (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 13:3; Genesis 13:10-13; Genesis 13:19; Luke 17:29; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:4-7; Mark 6:11; Matthew 10:15; Deuteronomy 29:23). (See GOMORRAH.) Palmer and Drake traversing the Negeb in a S.E. direction, as far as Mount Hor, made a detour to jebel ("mount") Madherah. At its summit and base are blocks of stone, of which the Arabs say: "a people once dwelt there, to whom travelers came seeking hospitality; but the people did to them a horrible deed, wherefore the Almighty in anger rained down stones, and destroyed them from off the face of the earth." Sodom is interpreted "burning" or else "vineyard" (Gesenius), "fortification" (Furst). Abraham could see the smoke of the burning cities from near Hebron. The Lord over night announced to him Sodom's doom, at some spot on the way from Mamre or Hebron toward Sodom, to which he had accompanied the angels (Genesis 18:16). Tradition says the spot was Caphar Berucha, from which the Dead Sea is visible through a ravine. Long ranges of hills intervene between Hebron and Sodom, but from the hill over Hebron or Mamre through a gap in the chain the whole district of the Jordan valley is visible. Lot at first pitched only towards Sodom, not until afterward did he go further south to Sodom itself (Genesis 13:12; Genesis 14:12; and Genesis 14:3 says expressly the vale of Siddim is the Salt Sea). This favors the S. of the Dead Sea site for Sodom, etc., which the traditional names confirm.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sodom/

Sodom in Hitchcock's Bible Names

their secret; their cement

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sodom/

Sodom Scripture - Ezekiel 16:55

When thy sisters, Sodom and her daughters, shall return to their former estate, and Samaria and her daughters shall return to their former estate, then thou and thy daughters shall return to your former estate.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Sodom Scripture - Ezekiel 16:53

When I shall bring again their captivity, the captivity of Sodom and her daughters, and the captivity of Samaria and her daughters, then [will I bring again] the captivity of thy captives in the midst of them:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Sodom Scripture - Ezekiel 16:46

And thine elder sister [is] Samaria, she and her daughters that dwell at thy left hand: and thy younger sister, that dwelleth at thy right hand, [is] Sodom and her daughters.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Sodom Scripture - Genesis 14:8

And there went out the king of Sodom, and the king of Gomorrah, and the king of Admah, and the king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela (the same [is] Zoar;) and they joined battle with them in the vale of Siddim;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Sodom Scripture - Genesis 14:2

[That these] made war with Bera king of Sodom, and with Birsha king of Gomorrah, Shinab king of Admah, and Shemeber king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela, which is Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Sodom Scripture - Zephaniah 2:9

Therefore [as] I live, saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, Surely Moab shall be as Sodom, and the children of Ammon as Gomorrah, [even] the breeding of nettles, and saltpits, and a perpetual desolation: the residue of my people shall spoil them, and the remnant of my people shall possess them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Zephaniah/2/

Sodom Scripture - Deuteronomy 32:32

For their vine [is] of the vine of Sodom, and of the fields of Gomorrah: their grapes [are] grapes of gall, their clusters [are] bitter:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/32/

Sodom Scripture - Ezekiel 16:48

[As] I live, saith the Lord GOD, Sodom thy sister hath not done, she nor her daughters, as thou hast done, thou and thy daughters.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Sodom Scripture - Genesis 13:10

And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it [was] well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, [even] as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/13/

Sodom Scripture - Genesis 10:19

And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah, and Admah, and Zeboim, even unto Lasha.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Spain in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

span (Spania): The country in the Southwest of Europe which still bears this name. It was Paul's purpose, as stated in Rom 15:24,28, to visit Spain. If, as is probable, he ultimately carried out this intention, it must have been after a release from his first imprisonment. Clement of Rome speaks of the apostle as having reached "the extreme limit of the West" (Epistle of Clement, v). See PAUL, THE APOSTLE; TARSHISH.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SPAIN/

Spain in Naves Topical Bible

Paul plans to visit Ro 15:24,28

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SPAIN/

Spain in Smiths Bible Dictionary

1 Macc. 8:3; Ro 15:24,28 The local designation, Tarshish, representing the Tartessus of the Greeks, probably prevailed until the fame of the Roman wars in that country reached the East, when it was superseded by its classical name. The mere intention of St. Paul to visit Spain (whether he really did visit it is a disputed question. --ED.) implies two interesting facts, viz., the establishment of a Christian community in that country, and that this was done by Hellenistic Jews resident there. The early introduction of Christianity into that country is attested by Irenaeus and Tertullian.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Spain/

Spain in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Paul expresses his intention (Rom. 15:24, 28) to visit Spain. There is, however, no evidence that he ever carried it into effect, although some think that he probably did so between his first and second imprisonment. (See TARSHISH -T0003588.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Spain/

Spain in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Solomon's fleet visited Spain, then named Tarshish (the Greek "Tartessus"). In classic times the name "Spain" came into use, traceable to the Basque Ezpana, i.e. on the edge of Europe. The Iberian language (from whence the country derived one of its names and its river Iberus or Ebro was designated) was the original of the Basque. Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28, Paul's intention to visit Spain may imply that a Christian church was already founded there. As to the early introduction of Christianity, compare Irenaeus 1:3 and Tertullian, Adv. Judg., 7.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Spain/

Spain in Hitchcock's Bible Names

rare; precious

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Spain/

Spain Scripture - Romans 15:24

Whensoever I take my journey into Spain, I will come to you: for I trust to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first I be somewhat filled with your [company].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Romans/15/

Spain Scripture - Romans 15:28

When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit, I will come by you into Spain.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Romans/15/

Succoth in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

suk'-oth, suk'-oth (cukkoth, "booths"; Skenai, Sokchoth, etc.): After parting with Esau, Jacob journeyed to Succoth, a name which he gave to the place from the "booths" which he erected to shelter his cattle (Gen 33:17). It was in the territory of Gad, and is mentioned with Beth-nimrah (Josh 13:27). In his pursuit of Zeba and Zalmunnah, Gideon seems to have retraced the path followed by Jacob, passing Succoth before Penuel (Jdg 8:5 ff). Their churlishness on that occasion brought dire punishment upon the men of Succoth. Gideon on his return "taught them" with thorns and briers (Jdg 8:16). In the soil of the valley between Succoth and Zarethan, which was suitable for the purpose, the brass castings of the furniture for Solomon's Temple were made (1 Ki 7:46; 2 Ch 4:17). Jerome (on Gen 33:17) says that in his day it was a city beyond Jordan in the district of Scythopolis. From the above data it is clear that Succoth lay on the East of the Jordan and North of the Jabbok. From Ps 60:6; 108:7, we may infer that it was close to the Jordan valley, part of which was apparently known by its name. Neubauer (Geog. du Talmud, 248) gives the Talmudic name as Tar`ala. Merrill (East of the Jordan, 386) and others compare this with Tell Deir `Alla, the name of an artificial mound about a mile North of the Jabbok, on the edge of the valley, fully 4 miles East of the Jordan. There is a place called Sakut West of the Jordan, about 10 miles South of Beisan. This has been proposed by some; but it is evident that Succoth lay East of the river. No trace of the name has been found here.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SUCCOTH+(1)/

Succoth in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(cukkoth; Sokchoth (Ex 12:37; 13:20; Nu 33:5)): The first station of the Hebrews on leaving Rameses (see EXODUS). The word means "booths." The distance from ETHAM (which see) suggests that the site may have lain in the lower part of Wady Tumeilat, but the exact position is unknown. This region seems possibly to have been called T-K-u by the Egyptians (see PITHOM). Brugsch and other scholars suppose this term to have been changed to Succoth by the Old Testament writer, but this is very doubtful, Succoth being a common Hebrew word, while T- K-u is Egyptian The Hebrew "c" does not appear ever to be rendered by "t" in Egyptian. The capital of the Sethroitic nome was called T-K-t (Pierret, Vocab. hieroglyph., 697), and this word means "bread." If the region of T-K-u was near this town, it would seem to have lain on the shore road from Edom to Zoan, in which case it could not be the Succoth of the Exodus.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SUCCOTH+(2)/

Succoth in Naves Topical Bible

1. A city which was located probably east of the Jordan River Jacob builds a house in Ge 33:17 Allotted to the tribe of Gad Jos 13:27 People of, punished by Gideon Jud 8:5-8,14-16 Located near the Jordan River 1Ki 7:46; 2Ch 4:17; Ps 60:6; 108:7 -2. The first camping place of the Israelites after leaving the city of Rameses Ex 12:37; 13:20; Nu 33:5,6

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SUCCOTH/

Succoth in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(booths). 1. An ancient town, first heard of in the account of the homeward journey of Jacob from Padan-aram. Ge 35:17 The name is derived from the fact of Jacob's having there put up "booths" (succoth) for his cattle as well as a house for himself. From the itinerary of Jacob's return it seems that Succoth lay between Peniel, near the ford of the torrent Jabbok and Shechem. Comp. Ge 32:30 and Gene 33:18 In accordance with this is the mention of Succoth in the narrative of Gideon's pursuit of Zebah and Zalluunna. Jud 5:5-17 It would appear from this passage that it lay east of the Jordan, which is corroborated by the fact that it was allotted to the tribe of Gad. Jos 13:27 Succoth is named once again after this --in 1Ki 7:46; 2Ch 4:17 --as marking the spot at which the brass founderies were placed for casting the metal work of the temple. (Dr. Merrill identifies it with a site called Tell Darala, one mile north of the Jabbok. --ED.) 2. The first camping-place of the Israelites when they left Egypt. Ex 12:37; 13:20; Nu 33:5,6 This place was apparently reached at the close of the first days march. Rameses, the starting-place, was probably near the western end of the Wadi-t-Tumeylat. The distance traversed in each day's journey was about fifteen miles.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Succoth/

Succoth in Easton's Bible Dictionary

booths. (1.) The first encampment of the Israelites after leaving Ramesses (Ex. 12:37); the civil name of Pithom (q.v.). (2.) A city on the east of Jordan, identified with Tell Dar'ala, a high mound, a mass of debris, in the plain north of Jabbok and about one mile from it (Josh. 13:27). Here Jacob (Gen. 32:17, 30; 33:17), on his return from Padan- aram after his interview with Esau, built a house for himself and made booths for his cattle. The princes of this city churlishly refused to afford help to Gideon and his 300 men when "faint yet pursuing" they followed one of the bands of the fugitive Midianites after the great victory at Gilboa. After overtaking and routing this band at Karkor, Gideon on his return visited the rulers of the city with severe punishment. "He took the elders of the city, and thorns of the wilderness and briers, and with them he taught the men of Succoth" (Judg. 8:13-16). At this place were erected the foundries for casting the metal-work for the temple (1 Kings 7:46).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Succoth/

Succoth in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("booths"), from saakak "to entwine" or "shelter." 1. Jerome places it "beyond Jordan" (Quaest. Hebrew). In Joshua 13:27-28 Succoth is assigned to Gad. The mention of the "house" and "booths" marks that Jacob stayed there for long, in contrast to his previous pilgrim life in tents, Succoth lay on the route between Pentel on the E. of Jordan and Shechem on the W. of Jordan (Genesis 32:30; Genesis 33:17-18). (See PENUEL; SHALEM.) Subsequently, in Gideon's days Succoth had 77 chiefs and elders (zeqeenim, "sheikhs", i.e. headmen, literally, old men). See also 1 Kings 7:46; 2 Chronicles 4:17. The Talmud makes Succoth a district (so Psalm 60:6, "the valley of Succoth") as well as a town, called Ter'alah; this corresponds to the tell or mound Der'ala, thickly strewed with pottery, in the great plain N. of the Jabbok, one mile from the river and three miles from where it leaves the hills. Close by is a smaller mound with ruins. The Bedouin say a city existed formerly on the large mound. E. of tell Der'ala is the ford of the Jabbok, "Mashra'a Canaan," i.e. Canaan's crossing. The route into Canaan which the nomadic tribes, as Midian, always took ("the way of them that dwell in tents," Judges 8:11) was along the course of the Jabbok and so across Jordan opposite Bethshean, thence spreading over the Esdraelon plain. Gideon (Judges 8:4-17) in pursuing Midian took the same course in reverse order until he reached Succoth. The men of Succoth, as living on this great army route between Canaan and the East, and having regard only to self and no concern for Israel's deliverance and no compassion for the sufferings of Gideon's gallant little band, would give no bread to their brethren lest they should incur the vengeance of Midian; nay more, they added insolence to unkindness. As then they classed themselves with the wicked, of whom thorns are the symbol, their retributive punishment was to be chastised with thorns of the wilderness (the strongest thorns: Isaiah 5:6; Isaiah 27:4; Amos 1:3; 2 Samuel 23:6-7). frontIsrael Exploation Quarterly Statement, April 1878, p. 81.) 2. Israel's first camping place after leaving Egypt, half way between Rameses and Etham, Succoth of the Birket Timseh ("the lake of crocodiles") on the road which led by the shortest way to the edge of the wilderness. Possibly from Hebrew sukowt "booths," but probably from the Egyptian sechet or sochot, the "domain of an officer of state" in Lower Egypt not far from Memphis, in the time of Chufu (Exodus 12:37; Exodus 13:20; Numbers 33:5-6).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Succoth/

Succoth in Hitchcock's Bible Names

tents; tabernacles

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Succoth/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:8

And he went up thence to Penuel, and spake unto them likewise: and the men of Penuel answered him as the men of Succoth had answered [him].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:15

And he came unto the men of Succoth, and said, Behold Zebah and Zalmunna, with whom ye did upbraid me, saying, [Are] the hands of Zebah and Zalmunna now in thine hand, that we should give bread unto thy men [that are] weary?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Succoth Scripture - Joshua 13:27

And in the valley, Betharam, and Bethnimrah, and Succoth, and Zaphon, the rest of the kingdom of Sihon king of Heshbon, Jordan and [his] border, [even] unto the edge of the sea of Chinnereth on the other side Jordan eastward.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/13/

Succoth Scripture - Judges 8:6

And the princes of Succoth said, [Are] the hands of Zebah and Zalmunna now in thine hand, that we should give bread unto thine army?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Shiloh in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(place of rest), a city of Ephraim. In Jud 21:19 it is said that Shiloh is "on the north side of Bethel, on the east side of the highway that goeth up from Bethel to Shechem and on the south of Lebonah." In agreement with this the traveller of our own city, going north from Jerusalem, lodges the first night at Beitin, the ancient Bethel; the next day, at the distance of a few hours, turns aside to the right, in order to visit Seilun, the Arabic for Shiloh; and then passing through the narrow wady which brings him to the main road, leaves el-Lebban, the Lebonah of Scripture, on the left, as he pursues "the highway" to Nublus, the ancient Shechem. [SHECHEM] Shiloh was one of the earliest and most sacred of the Hebrew sanctuaries. The ark of the covenant, which had been kept at Gilgal during the progress of the conquest, Jos 17:1 seq., was removed thence on the subjugation of the country, and kept at Shiloh from the last days of Joshua to the time of Samuel. Jos 18:10; Jud 18:31; 1Sa 4:3 It was here the Hebrew conqueror divided among the tribes the portion of the west Jordan region which had not been already allotted. Jos 18:10; 19:51 In this distribution, or an earlier one, Shiloh fell within the limits of Ephraim. Jos 16:5 The ungodly conduct of the sons of Eli occasioned the loss of the ark of the covenant, which had been carried into battle against the Philistines, and Shiloh from that time sank into insignificance. It stands forth in the Jewish history as a striking example of the divine indignation. Jer 7:12

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Shiloh in Easton's Bible Dictionary

generally understood as denoting the Messiah, "the peaceful one," as the word signifies (Gen. 49:10). The Vulgate Version translates the word, "he who is to be sent," in allusion to the Messiah; the Revised Version, margin, "till he come to Shiloh;" and the LXX., "until that which is his shall come to Shiloh." It is most simple and natural to render the expression, as in the Authorized Version, "till Shiloh come," interpreting it as a proper name (comp. Isa. 9:6). Shiloh, a place of rest, a city of Ephraim, "on the north side of Bethel," from which it is distant 10 miles (Judg. 21:19); the modern Seilun (the Arabic for Shiloh), a "mass of shapeless ruins." Here the tabernacle was set up after the Conquest (Josh. 18:1-10), where it remained during all the period of the judges till the ark fell into the hands of the Philistines. "No spot in Central Israel could be more secluded than this early sanctuary, nothing more featureless than the landscape around; so featureless, indeed, the landscape and so secluded the spot that from the time of St. Jerome till its re- discovery by Dr. Robinson in 1838 the very site was forgotten and unknown." It is referred to by Jeremiah (7:12, 14; 26:4-9) five hundred years after its destruction.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Shiloh/

Shiloh in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

From shaalah "to rest." The place at which Israel attained its state of rest, and where the Lord rested among them (Psalm 132:14). Judges (Judges 21:19) describes its position as "on the N. side of Bethel (Beitin), on the E. side of the highway that goeth up from Bethel to Shechem (Nablus), and on the S. of Lebonah." Now Seilun. The ark, which had been at Gilgal during the conquest of Canaan, was removed on the completion of the conquest to Shiloh where it remained from Joshua's closing days to Samuel's (Joshua 18:1-10; Judges 18:31; 1 Samuel 4:3). Here Joshua divided by lot the part of the western Jordan land not yet allotted (Joshua 19:51). Shiloh fell within Ephraim (Joshua 16:5-6). The animal feast of Jehovah when the daughters of Shiloh went forth in dances gave Benjamin, when threatened with extinction, the opportunity of carrying off wives (Judges 21:19-23). At a distance of 15 minutes' walk is a fountain reached through a narrow dale; it flows first into a well, thence into a reservoir, from which herds and flocks are watered. Here the daughters of Shiloh would resort, the spectators could see their dances from the amphitheater of surrounding hills. Terraces are traceable at the sides of the rocky hills, once covered with verdure and productiveness. Though the scenery is not striking the seclusion was favorable to worship and religious study. In the rockhewn sepulchres may have been laid the remains of some of Eli's house. Here Eli judged Israel and died of grief at the capture of the ark by the Philistines. Here Hannah prayed and Samuel was reared in the tabernacle and called to the prophetic office (1 Samuel 1; 2; 3). The sin of Hophni and Phinehas caused the loss of the ark and God's forsaking of His tabernacle at Shiloh (called in spiritual sense "the house of God," though not of stone: Judges 18:31; 2 Samuel 7:6; 1 Kings 3:2), so that this became a warning beacon of God's wrath against those who sin in the face of high spiritual privileges (Jeremiah 7:12; Psalm 78:60-61). Ahijah the prophet was here consulted by the messengers of Jeroboam's wife (1 Kings 11:29; 1 Kings 12:15; 1 Kings 14:1-2). From Shiloh came the half pagan men, with offerings for the Lord's house, who had cut themselves, and whom Ishmael slew (Jeremiah 41:5). A tell or hill, surrounded by higher hills, rises from an uneven plain, with a valley on the south side. On the hill the tabernacle would be conspicuous from all sides. On the summit of the hill are the remains of what was once a Jewish synagogue, subsequently used as a mosque. On the lintel over the doorway, between two wreaths of flowers, is carved a vessel shaped like a Roman amphora, so closely resembling the "pot of manna," as found on coins and in the ruins of the synagogue at Capernaum, that it doubtless formed part of the original building. There is a curious excavation in the rock which may have been the actual spot where the ark rested; for its guardians would select a place sheltered from the bleak winds of the highlands. The position of the sanctuary was central for the Israelites W. of Jordan. Major Wilson says northwards the tell at Seilun slopes down to a broad shoulder, across which a level court has been cut, 77 by 412 ft.; the rock is scarped to the height of five feet, evidently the site of the tabernacle. The mosque's title, the mosque of the Eternal, points to its original occupation by Jehovah's sanctuary.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Shiloh+(2)/

Shiloh in Hitchcock's Bible Names

peace; abundance

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Shiloh+(name+of+a+city)/

Shiloh Scripture - Joshua 22:9

And the children of Reuben and the children of Gad and the half tribe of Manasseh returned, and departed from the children of Israel out of Shiloh, which [is] in the land of Canaan, to go unto the country of Gilead, to the land of their possession, whereof they were possessed, according to the word of the LORD by the hand of Moses.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/22/

Shiloh Scripture - 1 Kings 14:2

And Jeroboam said to his wife, Arise, I pray thee, and disguise thyself, that thou be not known to be the wife of Jeroboam; and get thee to Shiloh: behold, there [is] Ahijah the prophet, which told me that [I should be] king over this people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/14/

Shiloh Scripture - Joshua 22:12

And when the children of Israel heard [of it], the whole congregation of the children of Israel gathered themselves together at Shiloh, to go up to war against them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/22/

Shiloh Scripture - Judges 21:19

Then they said, Behold, [there is] a feast of the LORD in Shiloh yearly [in a place] which [is] on the north side of Bethel, on the east side of the highway that goeth up from Bethel to Shechem, and on the south of Lebonah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/21/

Shiloh Scripture - Joshua 18:8

And the men arose, and went away: and Joshua charged them that went to describe the land, saying, Go and walk through the land, and describe it, and come again to me, that I may here cast lots for you before the LORD in Shiloh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/18/

Shiloh Scripture - Jeremiah 26:9

Why hast thou prophesied in the name of the LORD, saying, This house shall be like Shiloh, and this city shall be desolate without an inhabitant? And all the people were gathered against Jeremiah in the house of the LORD.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/26/

Shiloh Scripture - 1 Samuel 4:3

And when the people were come into the camp, the elders of Israel said, Wherefore hath the LORD smitten us to day before the Philistines? Let us fetch the ark of the covenant of the LORD out of Shiloh unto us, that, when it cometh among us, it may save us out of the hand of our enemies.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/4/

Shiloh Scripture - Joshua 19:51

These [are] the inheritances, which Eleazar the priest, and Joshua the son of Nun, and the heads of the fathers of the tribes of the children of Israel, divided for an inheritance by lot in Shiloh before the LORD, at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. So they made an end of dividing the country.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/19/

Shiloh Scripture - 1 Samuel 1:3

And this man went up out of his city yearly to worship and to sacrifice unto the LORD of hosts in Shiloh. And the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, the priests of the LORD, [were] there.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/1/

Shiloh Scripture - 1 Samuel 4:4

So the people sent to Shiloh, that they might bring from thence the ark of the covenant of the LORD of hosts, which dwelleth [between] the cherubims: and the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, [were] there with the ark of the covenant of God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/4/

Shinar in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

shi'-nar (shin`ar; Senaar Sen(n)aar): 1. Identification 2. Possible Babylonian Form of the Name 3. Sumerian and Other Equivalents 4. The Syriac Sen'ar 5. The Primitive Tongue of Shinar 6. Comparison with the Semitic Idiom 7. The Testimony of the Sculptures, etc., to the Race 8. The Sumerians Probably in Shinar before the Semites 9. The States of Shinar: (1) Sippar; (2) Kes; (3) Babylon; (4) Nippur; (5) Adab; (6) Surippak; (7) Umma; (8) Erech; (9) Lagas; (10) Larsa; (11) Ur; (12) Eridu; (13) The Land of the Sea; (14) Nisin, Isin, or Karrak; (15) Upa or Upia (Opis); (16) Other Well-known Cities 10. Shinar and Its Climate 11. Sculpture in Shinar 12. The First Nation to Use Writing in Western Asia 13. The System Employed, with an Example 1. Identification: The name given, in the earliest Hebrew records, to Babylonia, later called Babel, or the land of Babel (babhel, 'erets babhel). In Gen 10:10 it is the district wherein lay Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, cities which were the "beginning" of Nimrod's kingdom. In 11:2 Shinar is described as the land of the plain where migrants from the East settled, and founded Babel, the city, and its great tower. 2. Possible Babylonian Form of the Name: Though sometimes identified with the Babylonian Sumer, the connection of Shinar with that name is doubtful. The principal difficulty lies in the fact that what might be regarded as the non-dialectical form singar (which would alone furnish a satisfactory basis of comparison) is not found, and would, if existent, only apply to the southern portion of Babylonia. The northern tract was called Akkad, after the name of its capital city (see ACCAD). The Greek form Sen(n)aar shows that, at the time the Septuagint translation was made, there was no tradition that the `ayin was guttural, as the supposed Babylonian forms would lead us to expect. As the Biblical form Shinar indicates the whole of Babylonia, it corresponds with the native (Sumerian) Kingi-Ura, rendered "Sumer and Akkad," from which, by changing "K" into "Sh" (found in Sumerian), Shinar may have been derived, but this explanation is not free from difficulties. 3. Sumerian and Other Equivalents: This two-fold designation, Kingi-Ura, is that which is commonly used in the inscriptions of the earlier kings, though it cannot then have indicated always the whole country, but only such parts of it as acknowledged their overlordship. Later on the corresponding...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHINAR/

Shinar in Naves Topical Bible

(The land of)

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHINAR/

Shinar in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(country of two rivers), the ancient name of the great alluvial tract through which the Tigris and Euphrates pass before reaching the sea --the tract known in later times as Chaldaea or Babylonia. It was a plain country, where brick had to be used for stone and slime for mortar. Ge 11:3 Among the cities were Babel (Babylon), Erech or Orech (Orchoe), Calneh or Calno (probably Niffer), and Accad, the site of which is unknown. It may be suspected that Shinar was the name by which the Hebrews originally knew the lower Mesopotamian country where they so long dwelt, and which Abraham brought with him from "Ur of the Chaldees."

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Shinar/

Shinar in Easton's Bible Dictionary

LXX. and Vulgate "Senaar;" in the inscriptions, "Shumir;" probably identical with Babylonia or Southern Mesopotamia, extending almost to the Persian Gulf. Here the tower of Babel was built (Gen. 11:1-6), and the city of Babylon. The name occurs later in Jewish history (Isa. 11:11; Zech. 5:11). Shinar was apparently first peopled by Turanian tribes, who tilled the land and made bricks and built cities. Then tribes of Semites invaded the land and settled in it, and became its rulers. This was followed in course of time by an Elamite invasion; from which the land was finally delivered by Khammurabi, the son of Amarpel ("Amraphel, king of Shinar," Gen. 14:1), who became the founder of the new empire of Chaldea. (See AMRAPHEL -T0000221.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Shinar,+The+Land+of/

Shinar in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A region in Mesopotamia, the plain between the Tigris and Euphrates. Here the rebels against God's will built the Babel tower (Genesis 11:2-3). Famed for its wheat (Herodotus 1:193). Derived from sheni "two" and 'ar or nahar "rivers."

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Shinar/

Shinar in Hitchcock's Bible Names

watch of him that sleeps

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Shinar/

Shinar Scripture - Daniel 1:2

And the Lord gave Jehoiakim king of Judah into his hand, with part of the vessels of the house of God: which he carried into the land of Shinar to the house of his god; and he brought the vessels into the treasure house of his god.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Daniel/1/

Shinar Scripture - Genesis 14:9

With Chedorlaomer the king of Elam, and with Tidal king of nations, and Amraphel king of Shinar, and Arioch king of Ellasar; four kings with five.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Shinar Scripture - Genesis 14:1

And it came to pass in the days of Amraphel king of Shinar, Arioch king of Ellasar, Chedorlaomer king of Elam, and Tidal king of nations;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Shinar Scripture - Isaiah 11:11

And it shall come to pass in that day, [that] the Lord shall set his hand again the second time to recover the remnant of his people, which shall be left, from Assyria, and from Egypt, and from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the islands of the sea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/11/

Shinar Scripture - Isaiah 11:11

And it shall come to pass in that day, [that] the Lord shall set his hand again the second time to recover the remnant of his people, which shall be left, from Assyria, and from Egypt, and from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the islands of the sea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/11/

Shinar Scripture - Genesis 10:10

And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Shinar Scripture - Genesis 11:2

And it came to pass, as they journeyed from the east, that they found a plain in the land of Shinar; and they dwelt there.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/11/

Shinar Scripture - Zechariah 5:11

And he said unto me, To build it an house in the land of Shinar: and it shall be established, and set there upon her own base.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Zechariah/5/

Shushan in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

shoo'-shan (shushan; Sousan, Sousa): 1. Position, Eytmology and Forms of Its Name: This city, the Susu or Susan of the Babylonians, and the native (Elamite) Susun, is the modern Shush (Sus) in Southwestern Persia, a series of ruin-mounds on the banks of the river Kerkha. The ancient etymologies ("city of lilies" or "of horses") are probably worthless, as an etymology in the language of the place would rather be expected. Sayce therefore connects the name with sassa, meaning "former," and pointing to some such meaning as "the old" city. It is frequently mentioned in the Babylonian inscriptions of the 3rd millennium BC, and is expressed by the characters for the goddess Ishtar and for "cedar," implying that it was regarded as the place of the "divine grove" (see 5, below). In later days, the Assyrians substituted for the second character, that having the value of ses, possibly indicating its pronunciation. Radau (Early Babylonian History, 236) identifies Shushan (Susa) with the Sasa of the Babylonian king Kuri-galzu (14th century BC, if the first of the name), who dedicates to the Babylonian goddess Ninlil an inscription of a certain Siatu, who had, at an earlier date, dedicated it to Ishtar for the life of the Babylonian king Dungi (circa 2500 BC). 2. The Ruins: The surface still covered with ruins is about 2,000 hectares (4,940 acres), though this is but a fraction compared with the ancient extent of the city, which is estimated to have been between 12,000 and 15,000 hectares (29,640-37,000 acres). Though considerable, the extent of Susa was small compared with Nineveh and Babylon. The ruins are divided by the French explorers into four tracts: (1) The Citadel-mound (West), of the Achemenian period (5th century BC), circa 1,476 by 820 ft., dominating the plain (height circa 124 ft.). (2) The Royal City on the East of the Citadel, composed of two parts: the Apadana (Northeast), and a nearly triangular tract extending to the East and the South. This contains the remains of the palace of Darius and his successors, and occupies rather more than 123 acres. The palace proper and the throne-room were separated from the rest of the official buildings. (3) The City, occupied by artisans, merchants, etc. (4) The district on the right bank, similarly inhabited. This in ancient times extended into all the lower plain, between the Shaour and the Kerkha. Besides these, there...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHUSHAN/

Shushan in Naves Topical Bible

1. Capitol of the Medo-Persian Empire Es 1:2,3; 8:15 -2. King's palace at Ne 1:1; Es 1:2,5; 2:5,8; 4:8,16; 8:14,15; 9:11,15

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHUSHAN+(SUSA)/

Shushan in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(a lily), is said to have received its name from the abundance of the lily (shushan or shushanah) in its neighborhood. It was originally the capital of the country called in Scripture Elam, and by the classical writers Susis or Susiana. In the time of Daniel Susa was in the possession of the Babylonians, to whom Elam had probably passed at the division of the Assyrian empire made by Cyaxares and Nabopolassar. Da 8:2 The conquest of Babylon by Cyrus transferred Susa to the Persian dominion; and it was not long before the Achaemenian princes determined to make it the capital of their whole empire and the chief place of their own residence. According to some writers the change was made by Cyrus; according to others it had at any rate taken place before the death of Cambyses; but, according to the evidence of the place itself and of the other Achaemenian monuments, it would seem most probable that the transfer was really the work of Darius Hystaspes. Nehemiah resided here. Ne 1:1 Shushan was situated on the Ulai or Choaspes. It is identified with the modern Sus or Shush, its ruins are about three miles in circumference. (Here have been found the remains of the great palace build by Darius, the father of Xerxes, in which and the surrounding buildings took place the scenes recorded in the life of Esther. The great central hall was 343 feet long by 244 feet wide. The king's gate, says Schaff, where Mordecai sat, "was probably a hall 100 feet square, 150 feet from the northern portico. Between these two was probably the inner court, where Esther appeared before the king." --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Shushan+or+Susa/

Shushan in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a lily, the Susa of Greek and Roman writers, once the capital of Elam. It lay in the uplands of Susiana, on the east of the Tigris, about 150 miles to the north of the head of the Persian Gulf. It is the modern Shush, on the northwest of Shuster. Once a magnificent city, it is now an immense mass of ruins. Here Daniel saw one of his visions (Dan. 8); and here also Nehemiah (Neh. 1) began his public life. Most of the events recorded in the Book of Esther took place here. Modern explorers have brought to light numerous relics, and the ground- plan of the splendid palace of Shushan, one of the residences of the great king, together with numerous specimens of ancient art, which illustrate the statements of Scripture regarding it (Dan. 8:2). The great hall of this palace (Esther 1) "consisted of several magnificent groups of columns, together with a frontage of 343 feet 9 inches, and a depth of 244 feet. These groups were arranged into a central phalanx of thirty-six columns (six rows of six each), flanked on the west, north, and east by an equal number, disposed in double rows of six each, and distant from them 64 feet 2 inches." The inscriptions on the ruins represent that the palace was founded by Darius and completed by Artaxerxes.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Shushan/

Shushan in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Named from its abundant lilies. Capital of Elam, Cissia, or Susiana. Asshur-bani-pal, Esarhaddon's successor, in inscriptions says he took Shur and gives its ground plan sculptured (Layard Nin. 452), 600 B.C. In Belshazzar's last year Daniel was at Shushan in the palace (not actually, but transported in spirit) when he saw the vision (Daniel 8:2). Cyrus' conquest transferred Shushan to Persia. Darius Hystaspes and the Achaemenian princes made it the capital. He founded the grand palace described in Esther 1:5-6. Near Persia, cooler than Babylon, and having excellent water, Shushan was a suitable metropolis of the Persian empire. The kings left it for Ecbatana or Persepolis only in the height of summer, and for Babylon in the depth of winter; here Alexander found twelve million and the regalia of the great king. After this it declined. Shushan lay between the two streams of the Eulaeus and the Shapur. Canals joined the two and so surrounded the citadel of Shushan. The Coprates or "river of Dizful" and the right branch of the Choaspes ("Kerkhah") flowed a few miles E. and W. of the city. Hence arose its famed fertility. The Kerkhah water was so excellent that it was carried about with the great king on his journeys. The ruins cover a space 6,000 ft. E. to W. by 4,500 from N. to S.; the circumference is about three miles. Spacious artificial mounds or platforms stand separated from one another. The western one, of earth, gravel, and sundried bricks, is smallest but loftiest, 119 ft. above the Shapur, an obtuse angled triangle, with corners rounded off and base facing E. The sides are so steep as to be unapproachable to horsemen except at three points; round the top is a space of 2,850 ft. This is probably the famous citadel (Herodot. 3:68; Polyb. 5:48, 14; Strabo 15:3, section 2; Arrian Exp. Al. 3:16). S.E. of this western platform is the great platform of 60 acres, the eastern face 3,000 ft. long. The third platform is N. of the other two, a square of 1,000 ft. each way. The three together form a lozenge pointing almost due N., 4,500 ft. long by 3,000 broad. E. of these is an irregular extensive but lower platform, as large as all the rest put together. Low mounds extend beyond to the Dizful river. Sir F. Williams of Kars discovered the bases of three columns of the palace in the E. of the lozenge, 27 ft. 6 in. from center to center, similar to the "great hall" (Chel Minar) at Persepolis. "Loftus" (Chaldaea Susiana) ascertained next the position of all the 72 pillars of the original palace. On the bases of four columns were found trilingual inscriptions in the three languages used by the Achaemenian kings at Behistun. E. Norris deciphered the first part: "says Artaxerxes, the great king, king of kings, king of the country, king of the earth, son of king Darius ... Darius was the son of king Artaxerxes ... Artaxerxes was...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Shushan/

Shushan in Hitchcock's Bible Names

lily; rose; joy

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Shushan/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 2:8

So it came to pass, when the king's commandment and his decree was heard, and when many maidens were gathered together unto Shushan the palace, to the custody of Hegai, that Esther was brought also unto the king's house, to the custody of Hegai, keeper of the women.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/2/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 1:5

And when these days were expired, the king made a feast unto all the people that were present in Shushan the palace, both unto great and small, seven days, in the court of the garden of the king's palace;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/1/

Shushan Sripture - Esther 2:3

And let the king appoint officers in all the provinces of his kingdom, that they may gather together all the fair young virgins unto Shushan the palace, to the house of the women, unto the custody of Hege the king's chamberlain, keeper of the women; and let their things for purification be given [them]:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/2/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 4:16

Go, gather together all the Jews that are present in Shushan, and fast ye for me, and neither eat nor drink three days, night or day: I also and my maidens will fast likewise; and so will I go in unto the king, which [is] not according to the law: and if I perish, I perish.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/4/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 4:8

Also he gave him the copy of the writing of the decree that was given at Shushan to destroy them, to shew [it] unto Esther, and to declare [it] unto her, and to charge her that she should go in unto the king, to make supplication unto him, and to make request before him for her people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/4/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 8:15

And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/8/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:12

And the king said unto Esther the queen, The Jews have slain and destroyed five hundred men in Shushan the palace, and the ten sons of Haman; what have they done in the rest of the king's provinces? now what [is] thy petition? and it shall be granted thee: or what [is] thy request further? and it shall be done.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:18

But the Jews that [were] at Shushan assembled together on the thirteenth [day] thereof, and on the fourteenth thereof; and on the fifteenth [day] of the same they rested, and made it a day of feasting and gladness.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Daniel 8:2

And I saw in a vision; and it came to pass, when I saw, that I [was] at Shushan [in] the palace, which [is] in the province of Elam; and I saw in a vision, and I was by the river of Ulai.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Daniel/8/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:13

Then said Esther, If it please the king, let it be granted to the Jews which [are] in Shushan to do to morrow also according unto this day's decree, and let Haman's ten sons be hanged upon the gallows.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 8:14

[So] the posts that rode upon mules [and] camels went out, being hastened and pressed on by the king's commandment. And the decree was given at Shushan the palace.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/8/

Shushan Scripture - Nehemiah 1:1

The words of Nehemiah the son of Hachaliah. And it came to pass in the month Chisleu, in the twentieth year, as I was in Shushan the palace,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Nehemiah/1/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 1:2

[That] in those days, when the king Ahasuerus sat on the throne of his kingdom, which [was] in Shushan the palace,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/1/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 2:5

[Now] in Shushan the palace there was a certain Jew, whose name [was] Mordecai, the son of Jair, the son of Shimei, the son of Kish, a Benjamite;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/2/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:14

And the king commanded it so to be done: and the decree was given at Shushan; and they hanged Haman's ten sons.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:6

And in Shushan the palace the Jews slew and destroyed five hundred men.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:11

On that day the number of those that were slain in Shushan the palace was brought before the king.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 3:15

The posts went out, being hastened by the king's commandment, and the decree was given in Shushan the palace. And the king and Haman sat down to drink; but the city Shushan was perplexed.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/3/

Shushan Scripture - Esther 9:15

For the Jews that [were] in Shushan gathered themselves together on the fourteenth day also of the month Adar, and slew three hundred men at Shushan; but on the prey they laid not their hand.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/9/

Sidon in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

si'-don (tsidhon; Sidon; the King James Version, Sidon and Zidon; the Revised Version (British and American) SIDON only): 1. Location and Distinction: One of the oldest Phoenician cities, situated on a narrow plain between the range of Lebanon and the sea, in latitude 33 degrees 34 minutes nearly. The plain is well watered and fertile, about 10 miles long, extending from a little North of Sarepta to the Bostrenus (Nahr el-'Auly). The ancient city was situated near the northern end of the plain, surrounded with a strong wall. It possessed two harbors, the northern one about 500 yds. long by 200 wide, well protected by little islets and a breakwater, and a southern about 600 by 400 yards, surrounded on three sides by land, but open to the West, and thus exposed in bad weather. The date of the founding of the city is unknown, but we find it mentioned in the Tell el-Amarna Letters in the 14th century BC, and in Gen 10:19 it is the chief city of the Canaanites, and Joshua (Josh 11:8) calls it Great Sidon. It led all the Phoenician cities in its early development of maritime affairs, its sailors being the first to launch out into the open sea out of sight of land and to sail by night, guiding themselves by the stars. They were the first to come into contact with the Greeks and we find the mention of them several times in Homer, while other Phoenician towns are not noticed. Sidon became early distinguished for its manufactures and the skill of its artisans, such as beautiful metal-work in silver and bronze and textile fabrics embroidered and dyed with the famous purple dye which became known as Tyrian, but which was earlier produced at Sidon. Notices of these choice articles are found in Homer, both in the Iliad and the Odyssey. Sidon had a monarchical form of government, as did all the Phoenician towns, but it also held a sort of hegemony over those to the South as far as the limit of Phoenicia. It likewise made one attempt to establish an inland colony at Laish or Dan, near the headwaters of the Jordan, but this ended in disaster (Jdg 18:7,27,28). The attempt was not renewed, but many colonies were established over-sea. Citium, in Cyprus, was one of the earliest. 2. Historical: (1) The independence of Sidon was lost when the kings of the XVIIIth and XIXth Dynasties of Egypt added Israel and Syria to their dominions (1580-1205 BC). The kings of Sidon were allowed to remain on the throne as long as they paid tribute, and perhaps still exercised authority over the towns that had before been subject to them. When the power of Egypt declined under Amenhotep IV (1375-1358), the king of Sidon seems to have thrown off the yoke, as appears from the Tell el-Amarna Letters. Rib-addi of Gebal writes to the king of Egypt that Zimrida, king of Sidon, had joined the enemy, but Zimrida himself...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SIDON+(2)/

Sidon in Naves Topical Bible

1. Also called ZIDON Son of Canaan Ge 10:15; 1Ch 1:13 -2. A city on the northern boundary of the Canaanites Ge 10:19 Designated by Jacob as the border of the tribe of Zebulun Ge 49:13 Was on the northern boundary of the tribe of Asher Jos 19:28; 2Sa 24:6 Belonged to the land of Israel according to a promise Jos 13:6 Inhabitants of, lived in security and without a worry Jud 18:7 Israelites failed to make conquest of Jud 1:31; 3:3 The inhabitants of, contributed cedar for the first and second temple 1Ki 5:6; 1Ch 22:4; Ezr 3:7 Solomon marries women of 1Ki 11:1 Ahab marries a woman of 1Ki 16:31 People of, come to hear Jesus Mr 3:8; Lu 6:17 Inhabitants of, offend Herod Agrippa I Ac 12:20-23 Commerce of Isa 23:2,4,12 The sailors of Eze 27:8 Prophecies concerning Jer 25:15-22; 27:3-11; 47:4; Eze 28:21-23; 32:30; Joe 3:4-8 Jesus visits the region of, and heals the daughter of the non-Jewish, Syro-Phoenician woman Mt 15:21-28; Mr 7:24-31 Visited by Paul Ac 27:3

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SIDON/

Sidon in Smiths Bible Dictionary

the Greek form of the Phoenician name Zidon. [ZIDON]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sidon/

Sidon in Easton's Bible Dictionary

fishing; fishery, Gen. 10:15, 19 (A.V. marg., Tzidon; R.V., Zidon); Matt. 11:21, 22; Luke 6:17. (See ZIDON -T0003926.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sidon/

Sidon in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("fishing town"); SIDON or ZIDON. Genesis 10:9; Genesis 10:15; Joshua 11:8; Joshua 19:28; Judges 1:31. Sidon was in Asher (Isaiah 23:2; Isaiah 23:4; Isaiah 23:12). An ancient mercantile city of Phoenicia, in the narrow plain between Lebanon and the Mediterranean, where the mountains recede two miles from the sea; 20 miles N. of Tyre. Now Saida. Old Sidon stands on the northern slope of a promontory projecting a few hundred yards into the sea, having thus "a fine naturally formed harbour" (Strabo). The citadel occupies the hill behind on the south. Sidon is called (Genesis 10:15) the firstborn of Canaan, and "great Sidon" or the metropolis (Joshua 11:8). Sidonians is the generic name of the Phoenicians or Canaanites (Joshua 13:6; Judges 18:7); in Judges 18:28 Laish is said to be "far from Sidon," whereas Tyre, 20 miles nearer, would have been specified if it had then been a city of leading importance. (See TYRE.) So in Homer Sidon is named, but not Tyre. Justin Martyr makes (Judges 18:3) Tyre a colony planted by Sidon when the king of Ascalon took Sidon the year before the fall of Troy. Tyre is first mentioned in Scripture in Joshua 19:29 as "the strong city," the "daughter of Sidon" (Isaiah 23:12.) Sidon and Sidonians are names often subsequently used for Tyre, Tyrians. Thus Ethbaal, king of the Sidonians (1 Kings 16:31), is called by Menander in Josephus (Ant. 8:13, section 2) king of the Tyrians. By the time of Zechariah (Zechariah 9:2) Tyre has the precedency, "Tyrus and Sidon." Sidon revolted from the yoke of Tyre when Shalmaneser's invasion gave the opportunity. Rivalry with Tyre influenced Sidon to submit without resistance to Nebuchadnezzar. Its rebellion against the Persian Artaxerxes Ochus entailed great havoc on its citizens, Tennes its king proving traitor. Its fleet helped Alexander the Great against Tyre (Arrian, Anab. Al., 2:15). Augustus took away its liberties. Its population is now 5,000. Its trade and navigation have left it for Beirut. It was famed for elaborate embroidery, working of metals artistically, glass, the blowpipe, lathe, and graver, and cast mirrors. (Pliny 36:26, H. N. 5:17; 1 Kings 5:6, "not any can skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians".) Their seafaring is alluded to (Isaiah 23:2). Self indulgent ease followed in the train of their wealth, so that "the manner of the Sidonians" was proverbial (Judges 18:7).. Sidon had her own king (Jeremiah 25:22; Jeremiah 27:3). Sidonian women in Solomon's harem seduced him to worship Ashtoreth "the goddess of the Sidonians" (1 Kings 11:1; 1 Kings 11:4; 2 Kings 23:13). Joel reproves Sidon and Tyre for selling children of Judah and Jerusalem to the Grecians, and threatens them with a like fate, Judah selling their sons and daughters to the Sabeans. So Ezekiel (Ezekiel 28:22-24) threatens Sidon with pestilence and blood in her streets, so that she shall be no more a pricking brier unto Israel. Jesus went once to the coasts of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). Paul touched at Sidon on his voyage from Caesarea to Rome (Acts 27:3); by Julius' courteous permission Paul there "went unto his friends to refresh himself." Tyre and Sidon's doom shall be more tolerable in the day of judgment than that of those who witnessed Christ's works and teaching, yet repented not (Matthew 11:21-22). On a coin of the age of Antiochus IV Tyre claims to be "mother of the Sidonians," being at that time the capital city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sidon/

Sidon in Hitchcock's Bible Names

hunting; fishing; venison

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sidon/

Sidon Scripture - Acts 12:20

And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon: but they came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace; because their country was nourished by the king's [country].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/12/

Sidon Scripture - Genesis 10:19

And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah, and Admah, and Zeboim, even unto Lasha.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Seir in Easton's Bible Dictionary

rough; hairy. (1.) A Horite; one of the "dukes" of Edom (Gen. 36:20-30). (2.) The name of a mountainous region occupied by the Edomites, extending along the eastern side of the Arabah from the south-eastern extremity of the Dead Sea to near the Akabah, or the eastern branch of the Red Sea. It was originally occupied by the Horites (Gen. 14:6), who were afterwards driven out by the Edomites (Gen. 32:3; 33:14, 16). It was allotted to the descendants of Esau (Deut. 2:4, 22; Josh. 24:4; 2 Chr. 20:10; Isa. 21:11; Exek. 25:8). (3.) A mountain range (not the Edomite range, Gen. 32:3) lying between the Wady Aly and the Wady Ghurab (Josh. 15:10).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Seir/

Seir in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("hairy, rugged".) 1. Named so from a Horite chief (Genesis 36:20). Or probably Seir was his title, not proper name, given from the rugged rocky nature of the country, or from its abounding in bushes, in contrast to Halak "the smooth mountain." Esau and the Edomite supplanted the previous occupants the Horites. frontHORITES.) Mount Seir is the high range from the S. of the Dead Sea to Elath N. of the gulf of Akabah, on the E. of the Arabah, or "the plain from Elath and Ezion Geber." For as Israel moved from Mount Hor by way of that plain towards the Red Sea at Elath they "compassed Mount Seir" (Numbers 21:4; Deuteronomy 2:1; Deuteronomy 2:8). When Israel was refused leave to go the direct route to Moab through Edom's valleys (Numbers 20:20-21) they marched circuitously round the mountains down the Arabah between the limestone cliffs of the Tih on the W. and the granite range of Mount Seir on the E. until a few hours N. of Akabah the wady Ithm opened a gap in the mountains, so that turning to their left they could march N. toward Moab (Deuteronomy 2:3). Mount Hor alone of the range retains the old name of the Horites; it overhangs Petra; now jebel Haroon or Mount Aaron, where he died and was buried. The southern part, jebel es Sherah, between Petra and Akabah, perhaps bears trace of the name "Self." Jebal is now applied to the northern part of Mount Seir, answering to Gebal of Psalm 83:6-7; Geblah (i.e. "mountain") is the name for Mount Seir in the Samaritan Pentateuch and the Jerusalem targum. Jebal extends N. to the brook Zered (wady el Ahsi). "Mount Halak ("naked") that goeth up to Seir" (Joshua 11:17) was the northern border of Seir, probably the line of white "naked" hills running across the great valley eight miles S. of the Dead Sea, dividing between the Arabah on the S. and the depressed Ghor on the N. Seir and Sinai are not in Deuteronomy 33:2 grouped together geographically, but in reference to their being both alike scenes of God's glory manifested in behalf of His people. The prophetic denunciation of Ezekiel 35, "Behold O Mount Seir, ... I will make thee most desolate ... I will lay thy cities waste ... perpetual desolations": Burckhardt counted 40 cities in Jebal all now desolate. 2. A landmark N. of Judah (Joshua 15:10), W. of Kirjath Jearim and E. of Bethshemesh; the ridge between wady Aly and wady Ghurab. Now Mihsir, N.W. of Kesla or Chesalon. The resemblance in ruggedness to the southern Mount Seir may have given the name.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Seir,+mount/

Seir in Hitchcock's Bible Names

Seirath

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Seir/

Seir Scripture - Joshua 24:4

And I gave unto Isaac Jacob and Esau: and I gave unto Esau mount Seir, to possess it; but Jacob and his children went down into Egypt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/24/

Seir Scripture - Genesis 36:30

Duke Dishon, duke Ezer, duke Dishan: these [are] the dukes [that came] of Hori, among their dukes in the land of Seir.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/36/

Seir Scripture - Joshua 15:10

And the border compassed from Baalah westward unto mount Seir, and passed along unto the side of mount Jearim, which [is] Chesalon, on the north side, and went down to Bethshemesh, and passed on to Timnah:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Seir Scripture - Isaiah 21:11

The burden of Dumah. He calleth to me out of Seir, Watchman, what of the night? Watchman, what of the night?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/21/

Seir Scripture - Joshua 12:7

And these [are] the kings of the country which Joshua and the children of Israel smote on this side Jordan on the west, from Baalgad in the valley of Lebanon even unto the mount Halak, that goeth up to Seir; which Joshua gave unto the tribes of Israel [for] a possession according to their divisions;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/12/

Seir Scripture - Judges 5:4

LORD, when thou wentest out of Seir, when thou marchedst out of the field of Edom, the earth trembled, and the heavens dropped, the clouds also dropped water.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/5/

Seir Scripture - Ezekiel 35:15

As thou didst rejoice at the inheritance of the house of Israel, because it was desolate, so will I do unto thee: thou shalt be desolate, O mount Seir, and all Idumea, [even] all of it: and they shall know that I [am] the LORD.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/35/

Seir Scripture - Ezekiel 35:3

And say unto it, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, O mount Seir, I [am] against thee, and I will stretch out mine hand against thee, and I will make thee most desolate.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/35/

Seir Scripture - Deuteronomy 2:12

The Horims also dwelt in Seir beforetime; but the children of Esau succeeded them, when they had destroyed them from before them, and dwelt in their stead; as Israel did unto the land of his possession, which the LORD gave unto them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/2/

Seir Scripture - Genesis 36:8

Thus dwelt Esau in mount Seir: Esau [is] Edom.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/36/

Seleucia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

se-lu'-shi-a (Seleukia): The seaport of Antioch from which it is 16 miles distant. It is situated 5 miles North of the mouth of the Orontes, in the northwestern corner of a fruitful plain at the base of Mt. Rhosus or Pieria, the modern Jebel Musa, a spur of the Amanus Range. Built by Seleucus Nicator (died 280 BC) it was one of the Syrian Tetrapolis, the others being Apameia, Laodicea and Antioch. The city was protected by nature on the mountain side, and, being strongly fortified on the South and West, was considered invulnerable and the key to Syria (Strabo 751; Polyb. v.58). It was taken, however, by Ptolemy Euergetes (1 Macc 11:8) and remained in his family till 219 BC, when it was recovered for the Seleucids by Antiochus the Great, who then richly adorned it. Captured again by Ptolemy Philometor in 146 BC, it remained for a short time in the hands of the Egyptians. Pompey made it a free city in 64 BC in return for its energy in resisting Tigranes (Pliny, NH, v.18), and it was then greatly improved by the Romans, so that in the 1st century AD it was in a most flourishing condition. On their first missionary journey Paul and Barnabas passed through it (Acts 13:4; 14:26), and though it is not named in Acts 15:30,39, this route is again implied; while it is excluded in Acts 15:3. The ruins are very extensive and cover the whole space within the line of the old walls, which shows a circuit of four miles. The position of the Old Town, the Upper City and the suburbs may still be identified, as also that of the Antioch Gate, the Market Gate and the King's Gate, which last leads to the Upper City. There are rock-cut tombs, broken statuary and sarcophagi at the base of the Upper City, a position which probably represents the burial place of the Seleucids. The outline of a circus or amphitheater can also be traced, while the inner harbor is in perfect condition and full of water. It is 2,000 ft. long by 1,200 ft. broad, and covers 47 acres, being oval or pear-shaped. The passage seaward, now silted up, was protected by two strong piers or moles, which are locally named after Barnabas and Paul. The most remarkable of the remains, however, is the great water canal behind the city, which the emperor Constantius cut through the solid rock in 338 AD. It is 3,074 ft. long, has an average breadth of 20 ft., and is in some places 120 ft. deep. Two portions of 102 and 293 ft. in length are tunneled. The object of the work was clearly to carry the mountain torrent direct to the sea, and so protect the city from the risk of flood during the wet season. Church synods occasionally met in Seleucia in the early centuries, but it gradually sank into decay, and long before the advent of Islam it had lost all its significance.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SELEUCIA/

Seleucia in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Syria beside the Mediterranean Sea) -Paul visits Ac 13:4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SELEUCIA/

Seleucia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(named after its founder, Seleucus), near the mouth of the Orontes, was practically the seaport of Antioch. The distance between the two towns was about 16 miles. St. Paul, with Barnabas, sailed from Seleucia at the beginning of his first missionary circuit. Ac 13:4 This strong fortress and convenient seaport was constructed by the first Seleucus, and here he was buried. It retained its importance in Roman times and in St. Paul's day it had the privileges of a free city. The remains are numerous.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sele-ucia+or+Sele-ucia/

Seleucia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the sea-port of Antioch, near the mouth of the Orontes. Paul and his companions sailed from this port on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:4). This city was built by Seleucus Nicator, the "king of Syria." It is said of him that "few princes have ever lived with so great a passion for the building of cities. He is reputed to have built in all nine Seleucias, sixteen Antiochs, and six Laodiceas." Seleucia became a city of great importance, and was made a "free city" by Pompey. It is now a small village, called el-Kalusi.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Seleucia/

Seleucia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Antioch's seaport. The Orontes passes Antioch, and falls into the sea near Seleucia, 16 miles from Antioch. Paul and Barnabas at their first missionary tour sailed from that port (Acts 13:4), and landed there on returning (Acts 14:26). Named from the great Alexander's successor, Seleucus Nicator, its founder, who died 280 B.C. The two piers of the old harbour still remain, bearing the names of Paul and Barnabas; the masonry is so good that it has been proposed to clear out and repair the harbour.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Seleucia/

Seleucia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

shaken or beaten by the waves

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Seleucia/

Seleucia Scripture - Acts 13:4

So they, being sent forth by the Holy Ghost, departed unto Seleucia; and from thence they sailed to Cyprus.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Sharon in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

shar'-un (ha-sharon, with the definite article possibly meaning "the plain"; to pedion, ho drumos, ho Saron): (1) This name is attached to the strip of fairly level land which runs between the mountains and the shore of the Mediterranean, stretching from Nahr Ruben in the South to Mt. Carmel in the North. There are considerable rolling hills; but, compared with the mountains to the East, it is quite properly described as a plain. The soil is a deep rich loam, which is favorable to the growth of cereals. The orange, the vine and the olive grow to great perfection. When the many-colored flowers are in bloom it is a scene of rare beauty. Of the streams in the plain four carry the bulk of the water from the western slopes of the mountains to the sea. They are also perennial, being fed by fountains. Nahr el-`Aujeh enters the sea to the North of Jaffa; Nahr Iskanderuneh 7 miles, and Nahr el-Mefjir fully 2 miles South of Caesarea; and Nahr ez-Zerqa, the "Crocodile River," 2 1/2 miles North of Caesarea. Nahr el-Falik runs its short course about 12 miles North of Nahr el-`Aujeh. Water is plentiful, and at almost any point it may be obtained by digging. Deep, finely built wells near some of the villages are among the most precious legacies left by the Crusaders. The breadth of the plain varies from 8 to 12 miles, being broadest in the Sharon. There are traces of a great forest in the northern part, which accounts for the use of the term drumos. Josephus (Ant., XIV, xiii, 3) speaks of "the woods" (hoi drumoi) and Strabo (xvi) of "a great wood." There is still a considerable oak wood in this district. The "excellency" of Carmel and Sharon (Isa 35:2) is probably an allusion to the luxuriant oak forests. As in ancient times, great breadths are given up to the pasturing of cattle. Over David's herds that fed in Sharon was Shitrai the Sharonite (1 Ch 27:29). In the day of Israel's restoration "Sharon shall be a fold of flocks" (Isa 65:10). Jerome speaks of the fine cattle fed in the pastures of Sharon, and also sings the praises of its wine (Comm. on Isa 33 and 65). Toward the Sharon no doubt there was more cultivation then than there is at the present day. The German colony to the North of Jaffa, preserving in its name, Sarona, the old Greek name of the plain, and several Jewish colonies are proving the wonderful productiveness of the soil. The orange groves of Jaffa are far-famed. "The rose of Sharon" (Song 2:1) is a mistranslation: chabhatstseleth is not a "rose," but the white narcissus, which in season abounds in the plain. Sharon is mentioned in the New Testament only in Acts 9:35. (2) A district East of the Jordan, occupied by the tribe of Gad (1 Ch 5:16; here the name is without the article). Kittel ("Ch," SBOT) suggests that this is a corruption from "Sirion," which again is synonymous with Hermon. He would therefore identify Sharon with the pasture lands of Hermon. Others think that the mishor or table-land of Gilead is intended. (3) In Josh 12:18 we should perhaps read "the king of Aphek in Sharon." See LASSHARON. The order seems to point to some place Northeast of Tabor. Perhaps this is to be identified with the Sarona of Eusebius, Onomasticon, in the district between Tabor and Tiberias. If so, the name may be preserved in that of Sarona on the plateau to the Southwest of Tiberias.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHARON/

Sharon in Naves Topical Bible

1. The maritime slope of Israel north of the city of Joppa David's herds in 1Ch 27:29 Roses and beauty of So 2:1; Isa 33:9; 35:2; 65:10 Called SARON Ac 9:35 -2. A place that has not been ascertained 1Ch 5:16

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHARON/

Sharon in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(a plain), a district of the holy land occasionally referred to in the Bible. 1Ch 5:16; Isa 33:9 In Ac 9:35 called SARON. The name has on each occurrence with one exception only, 1Ch 5:16 the definite article; it would therefore appear that "the Sharon" was some well-defined region familiar to the Israelites. It is that broad, rich tract of land which lies between the mountains of the central part of the holy land and the Mediterranean --the northern continuation of the Shefelah. [PALESTINE] The Sharon of 2Ch 5:16 to which allusion has already been made, is distinguished front the western plain by not having the article attached to its name, as the other invariably has. It is also apparent from the passage itself that it was some district on the east of the Jordan, in the neighborhood of Gilead and Bashan. The name has not been met with in that direction.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sharon/

Sharon in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a plain, a level tract extending from the Mediterranean to the hill country to the west of Jerusalem, about 30 miles long and from 8 to 15 miles broad, celebrated for its beauty and fertility (1 Chr. 27:29; Isa. 33:9; 35:2; 65:10). The "rose of Sharon" is celebrated (Cant. 2:1). It is called Lasharon (the article la being here a part of the word) in Josh. 12:18.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sharon,+Saron/

Sharon in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

1 Chronicles 5:16; Isaiah 33:9, "the excellency (beauty) of Sharon" (Isaiah 35:2), Isaiah 65:10; Song of Solomon 2:1, "the rose (narcissus) of Sharon," famous for flowers and for pasture; Acts 9:35. The broad rich tract between the central mountains and the Mediterranean, stretching from Joppa or Jaffa northwards to Carmel. Half the width is of marl and alluvial soil, the other half of old red semi-consolidated sand and shelly breccias. (See PALESTINE.) The coast is marked by white sandhills; fine grain, well trimmed plantations, and long gentle swells of rich red and black earth, characterize Sharon. A second Sharon beyond Jordan is not meant in 1 Chronicles 5:16, as some have imagined. It is not said that the Gadites possessed cities in Sharon but only pastures of Sharon; these the Gadites sought for their herds as far as the Mediterranean coast. As intercourse was maintained between the cis- Jordanic Manassites and the trans-Jordanic Manassites, the Gadites with the latter might very well repair with their herds to the Sharon pastures, as the domain of cis-Jordanic Manasseh stretched into the plain of Sharon. Translated "and in all the pasture grounds of Sharon unto their outgoings" to the sea (Joshua 17:9). David had his herds feeding in Sharon with Shitrai the Sharonite over them. Gesenius derives Sharon from jashar "straight," "a plain country." One of the earliest recorded travelers in this district was an Egyptian, whose papyrus has been lately transliterated; then as now agricultural pursuits prevailed here, and illustrations are still found of the Egyptian and Eastern plows.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sharon/

Sharon in Hitchcock's Bible Names

his plain; his song

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sharon/

Sharon Scripture - Isaiah 35:2

It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing: the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Sharon, they shall see the glory of the LORD, [and] the excellency of our God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/35/

Sharon Scripture - 1 Chronicles 27:29

And over the herds that fed in Sharon [was] Shitrai the Sharonite: and over the herds [that were] in the valleys [was] Shaphat the son of Adlai:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/27/

Sharon Scripture - Isaiah 33:9

The earth mourneth [and] languisheth: Lebanon is ashamed [and] hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan and Carmel shake off [their fruits].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/33/

Sharon Scripture - Isaiah 65:10

And Sharon shall be a fold of flocks, and the valley of Achor a place for the herds to lie down in, for my people that have sought me.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/65/

Sharon Scripture - 1 Chronicles 5:16

And they dwelt in Gilead in Bashan, and in her towns, and in all the suburbs of Sharon, upon their borders.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/5/

Sharon Scripture - Song of Solomon 2:1

I [am] the rose of Sharon, [and] the lily of the valleys.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Song+of+Solomon/2/

Sheba in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

she'-ba (shebha`; Sabee, or Samaa): The name of one of the towns allotted to Simeon (Josh 19:2). the King James Version mentions it as an independent town, but as it is not mentioned at all in the parallel list (1 Ch 4:28), and is omitted in Josh 19:2 in some manuscripts, it is probable that the Revised Version (British and American) is correct in its translation "Beer-sheba or Sheba." Only in this way can the total of towns in this group be made 13 (Josh 19:6). If it is a separate name, it is probably the same as SHEMA (which see).

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHEBA+(2)/

Sheba in Naves Topical Bible

1. Son of Raamah Ge 10:7; 1Ch 1:9 -2. Son of Joktan Ge 10:28; 1Ch 1:22 -3. Son of Jokshan Ge 25:3; 1Ch 1:32 -4. A Benjamite who led an insurrection against David 2Sa 20 -5. A Gadite 1Ch 5:13 -6. A city of the tribe of Simeon Jos 19:2 -7. Queen of, visits Solomon 1Ki 10:1; 13; 2Ch 9:1-12 Kings of, bring gifts to Solomon Ps 72:10 Rich in gold Ps 72:15 Rich in incense Jer 6:20 Merchandise of Eze 27:22,23; 38:13 Prophecies concerning the people of, coming into the kingdom of the Messiah Isa 60:6 See SABEANS

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHEBA/

Sheba in Smiths Bible Dictionary

one of the towns of the allotment of Simeon, Jos 19:2 probably the same as Shema. Jos 15:26

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sheba+(3)/

Sheba in Easton's Bible Dictionary

an oath, seven. (1.) Heb. shebha, the son of Raamah (Gen. 10:7), whose descendants settled with those of Dedan on the Persian Gulf. (2.) Heb. id. A son of Joktan (Gen. 10:28), probably the founder of the Sabeans. (3.) Heb. id. A son of Jokshan, who was a son of Abraham by Keturah (Gen. 25:3). (4.) Heb. id. A kingdom in Arabia Felix. Sheba, in fact, was Saba in Southern Arabia, the Sabaeans of classical geography, who carried on the trade in spices with the other peoples of the ancient world. They were Semites, speaking one of the two main dialects of Himyaritic or South Arabic. Sheba had become a monarchy before the days of Solomon. Its queen brought him gold, spices, and precious stones (1 Kings 10:1-13). She is called by our Lord the "queen of the south" (Matt. 12:42). (5.) Heb. shebha', "seven" or "an oak." A town of Simeon (Josh. 19:2). (6.) Heb. id. A "son of Bichri," of the family of Becher, the son of Benjamin, and thus of the stem from which Saul was descended (2 Sam. 20:1-22). When David was returning to Jerusalem after the defeat of Absalom, a strife arose between the ten tribes and the tribe of Judah, because the latter took the lead in bringing back the king. Sheba took advantage of this state of things, and raised the standard of revolt, proclaiming, "We have no part in David." With his followers he proceeded northward. David seeing it necessary to check this revolt, ordered Abishai to take the gibborim, "mighty men," and the body-guard and such troops as he could gather, and pursue Sheba. Joab joined the expedition, and having treacherously put Amasa to death, assumed the command of the army. Sheba took refuge in Abel-Bethmaachah, a fortified town some miles north of Lake Merom. While Joab was engaged in laying siege to this city, Sheba's head was, at the instigation of a "wise woman" who had held a parley with him from the city walls, thrown over the wall to the besiegers, and thus the revolt came to an end.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sheba/

Sheba in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

from whom the country derives its name. 1. Grandson of Cush and son of Raamah (Genesis 10:7). 2. Son of Joktan (Genesis 10:28). 3. Grandson of Abraham by Keturah; son of Jokshan (Genesis 25:3). This is an instance of the intermingling of the early descendants of Shem and Ham. SHEBA was a wealthy region of Arabia Felix or Yemen (1 Kings 10:1; Psalm 72:10; Psalm 72:15, where "Sheba" is Joktanite, "SEBA" Cushite ; Job 1:15, the Keturahite Sheba, Job 6:19; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:22, it was the Sheba son of Raamah and grandson of Cush that carried on the Indian traffic with Israel in conjunction with the Keturahite Sheba (Joel 3:8). The Sabeans were famed for myrrh, frankincense, and cinnamon, their chief city being Mariaba (Strabo 16:777), named also Seba, the one being the city the other the fortress (near the famous dyke el 'Arim, built to store water and avert mountain torrents.) This was afterward the celebrated Himyeritic Arab kingdom, called from the ruling family of Himyer. The Cushite Sheba and his brother Dedan settled along the Persian gulf, but afterward were combined with the Joktanite Sabean kingdom. (See RAAMAH.) The buildings of Mariaba or Seba are of massive masonry, and evidently of Cushite origin. The Joktanites (Semitics) were the early colonists of southern Arabia. The Himyerites Strabo first mentions in the expedition of A. Gellius (24 B.C.); the Arabs however place Himyer high in their list. Himyer may mean "the red man," related to the "Red Sea" and "Phoenician." The kingdom probably was called "Sheba" (Seba means "turned red"), its reigning family Himyer; the old name was preserved until the founding of the modern Himyeritic kingdom about a century B.C. "The queen of Sheba" (1 Kings 10:1-2; 1 Kings 10:10) ruled in Arabia, not Ethiopia, as the Abyssinian church allege; Sheba being in the extreme Sheba of Arabia, "she came (a distance of nearly a thousand miles) from the uttermost parts of the earth," as then known, to hear the wisdom of Solomon (Matthew 12:42; Luke 11:31). Four principal Arab peoples are named: the Sabeans, Atramitae or Hadramaut, Katabeni or Kahtan or Joktan, and the Mimaei. SHEBA. A town of Simeon (Joshua 19:2). Possibly the SHEMA of Joshua 15:26. Now Saawe (Knobel). Or Sheba is a transcriber's error, repeating the end of Beer-sheba; for the number of names in Joshua 19:2-6 including Sheba is 14, whereas 13 is the number stated, and in 1 Chronicles 4:28 Sheba is omitted in the list of Simeon. But Conder (Israel Exploration, January 1875) identifies Sheba with Tell el Seba, two miles of Beersheba, and on the line to Moladah (Joshua 19:2); its well is a quarter of a mile W. of it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sheba+(2)/

Sheba in Hitchcock's Bible Names

captivity; old man; repose; oath

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sheba/

Sheba Scripture - 1 Kings 10:10

And she gave the king an hundred and twenty talents of gold, and of spices very great store, and precious stones: there came no more such abundance of spices as these which the queen of Sheba gave to king Solomon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/10/

Sheba Scripture - Ezekiel 38:13

Sheba, and Dedan, and the merchants of Tarshish, with all the young lions thereof, shall say unto thee, Art thou come to take a spoil? hast thou gathered thy company to take a prey? to carry away silver and gold, to take away cattle and goods, to take a great spoil?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/38/

Sheba Scripture - 2 Chronicles 9:1

And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon, she came to prove Solomon with hard questions at Jerusalem, with a very great company, and camels that bare spices, and gold in abundance, and precious stones: and when she was come to Solomon, she communed with him of all that was in her heart.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/9/

Sheba Scripture - 2 Chronicles 9:9

And she gave the king an hundred and twenty talents of gold, and of spices great abundance, and precious stones: neither was there any such spice as the queen of Sheba gave king Solomon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/9/

Sheba Scripture - Genesis 10:7

And the sons of Cush; Seba, and Havilah, and Sabtah, and Raamah, and Sabtecha: and the sons of Raamah; Sheba, and Dedan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Sheba Scripture - 1 Chronicles 1:9

And the sons of Cush; Seba, and Havilah, and Sabta, and Raamah, and Sabtecha. And the sons of Raamah; Sheba, and Dedan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/1/

Sheba Scripture - 1 Kings 10:13

And king Solomon gave unto the queen of Sheba all her desire, whatsoever she asked, beside [that] which Solomon gave her of his royal bounty. So she turned and went to her own country, she and her servants.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/10/

Sheba Scripture - 1 Chronicles 1:32

Now the sons of Keturah, Abraham's concubine: she bare Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah. And the sons of Jokshan; Sheba, and Dedan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/1/

Sheba Scripture - 2 Samuel 20:22

Then the woman went unto all the people in her wisdom. And they cut off the head of Sheba the son of Bichri, and cast [it] out to Joab. And he blew a trumpet, and they retired from the city, every man to his tent. And Joab returned to Jerusalem unto the king.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/20/

Sheba Scripture - 2 Samuel 20:21

The matter [is] not so: but a man of mount Ephraim, Sheba the son of Bichri by name, hath lifted up his hand against the king, [even] against David: deliver him only, and I will depart from the city. And the woman said unto Joab, Behold, his head shall be thrown to thee over the wall.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/20/

Shechem in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

she'-kem (shekhem, "shoulder"; Suchem, he Sikima, ta Sikima, etc.; the King James Version gives "Sichem" in Gen 12:6; and "Sychem" in Acts 7:16): 1. Historical: This place is first mentioned in connection with Abraham's journey from Haran. At the oak of Moreh in the vicinity he reared his first altar to the Lord in Israel (Gen 12:6 f). It was doubtless by this oak that Jacob, on his return from Paddan-aram, buried "the strange (the American Standard Revised Version "foreign") gods" (Gen 35:4). Hither he had come after his meeting with Esau (Gen 33:18). Eusebius, in Onomasticon, here identifies Shechem with Shalem; but see SHALEM. To the East of the city Jacob pitched his tent in a "parcel of ground" which he had bought from Hamor, Shechem's father (Gen 33:19). Here also he raised an altar and called it El-Elohe-Israel, "God, the God of Israel" (Gen 33:20). Then follows the story of Dinah's defilement by Shechem, son of the city's chief; and of the treacherous and terrible vengeance exacted by Simeon and Levi (Genesis 34). To the rich pasture land near Shechem Joseph came to seek his brethren (Gen 37:12 ff). It is mentioned as lying to the West of Michmethath (el-Makhneh) on the boundary of Manasseh (Josh 17:7). It was in the territory of Ephraim; it was made a city of refuge, and assigned to the Kohathite Levites (Josh 20:7; 21:21). Near the city the Law was promulgated (Dt 27:11; Josh 8:33). When his end was approaching Joshua gathered the tribes of Israel here and addressed to them his final words of counsel and exhortation (chapter 24). Under the oak in the neighboring sanctuary he set up the stone of witness (24:26). The war of conquest being done, Joseph's bones were buried in the parcel of ground which Jacob had bought, and which fell to the lot of Joseph's descendants (24:33). Abimelech, whose mother was a native of the city, persuaded the men of Shechem to make him king (Jdg 9:1-6), evidently seeking a certain consecration from association with "the oak of the pillar that was in Shechem." Jotham's parable was spoken from the cliff of Gerizim overhanging the town (Jdg 9:7 ff). After a reign of three years Abimelech was rejected by the people. He captured the city, razed it to the foundations, and sowed it with salt. It was then the seat of Canaanite idolatry, the temple of Baal-berith being here (Jdg 9:4,46). In the time of the kings we find that the city was once more a gathering-place of the nation. It was evidently the center, especially for the northern tribes; and hither Rehoboam came in the hope of getting his succession to the throne confirmed (1 Ki 12:1; 2 Ch 10:1). At the disruption Jeroboam fortified the city and made it his residence (2 Ch 10:25; Ant, VIII, viii, 4). The capital of the Northern Kingdom was moved, however, first to Tirzah and then to Samaria, and Shechem declined in political importance. Indeed it is not named again in the history of the monarchy. Apparently there were Israelites in it after the captivity, some of whom on their way to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem met a tragic fate at the hands of Ishmael ben Nethaniah (Jer 41:5 ff). It became the central city of the Samaritans, whose shrine...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHECHEM/

Shechem in Naves Topical Bible

1. Also called SICHEM and SYCHEM, a district in the central part of the land of Canaan Abraham lives in Ge 12:6 The flocks and herds of Jacob kept in Ge 37:12-14 Joseph buried in Jos 24:32 Jacob buried in Ac 7:16; with Ge 50:13 -2. Also called SYCHAR, a city of refuge in Mount Ephraim Jos 20:7; 21:21; Jud 21:19 Joshua assembled the tribes of Israel at, with all their elders, chiefs, and judges, and presented them before the Lord Jos 24:1-28 Joshua buried at Jos 24:30-32 Abimelech made king at Jud 8:31; 9 Rehoboam crowned at 1Ki 12:1 Destroyed by Abimelech Jud 9:45 Rebuilt by Jeroboam 1Ki 12:25 Men of, killed by Ishmael Jer 41:5 Jesus visits; disciples made in Joh 4:1-42 -3. Son of Hamor; seduces Jacob's daughter; killed by Jacob's sons Ge 33:19; 34; Jos 24:32; Jud 9:28 Called SYCHEM Ac 7:16 -4. Ancestor of the Shechemites Nu 26:31; Jos 17:2 -5. Son of Shemidah 1Ch 7:19

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHECHEM/

Shechem in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(back or shoulder). 1. An important city in central Israel, in the valley between mounts Ebal and Gerizim, 34 miles north of Jerusalem and 7 miles southeast of Samaria. Its present name, Nablus, is a corruption of Neapolis, which succeeded the more ancient Shechem, and received its new name from Vespasian. On coins still extant it is called Flavia Neapolis. The situation of the town is one of surpassing beauty. It lies in a sheltered valley, protected by Gerizim on the south and Ebal on the north. The feet of these mountains, where they rise from the town, are not more than five hundred yards apart. The bottom of the valley is about 1800 feet above the level of the sea, and the top of Gerizim 800 feet higher still. The sit of the present city, which was also that of the Hebrew city, occurs exactly on the water-summit; and streams issuing from the numerous springs there flow down the opposite slopes of the valley, spreading verdure and fertility in every direction. Travellers vie with each other in the language which they employ to describe the scene that here bursts so suddenly upon them on arriving in spring or early summer at this paradise of the holy land. "The whole valley," says Dr. Robinson, "was filled with gardens of vegetables and orchards of all kinds of fruits, watered by fountains which burst forth in various parts and flow westward in refreshing streams. it came upon us suddenly like a scene of fairy enchantment. We saw nothing to compare with it in all Israel." The allusions to Shechem in the Bible are numerous, and show how important the place was in Jewish history. Abraham, on his first migration to the land of promise, pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak (or terebinth) of Moreh at Shechem. "The Canaanite was then in the land;" and it is evident that the region, if not the city, was already in possession of the aboriginal race. See Ge 12:6 At the time of Jacob's arrival here, after his sojourn in Mesopotamia, Ge 33:18; 34 Shechem was a Hivite city, of which Hamor, the father of Shechem, was the headman. it was at this time that the patriarch purchased from that chieftain "the parcel of the field" which he subsequently bequeathed, as a special patrimony, to his son Joseph. Ge 33:19; Jos 24:32; Joh 4:5 The field lay undoubtedly on the rich plain of the Mukhna, and its value was the greater on account of the well which Jacob had dug there, so as not to be dependent on his neighbors for a supply of water. In the distribution of the land after its conquest by the Hebrews, Shechem fell to the lot of Ephraim, Jos 20:7 but was assigned to the Levites, and became a city of refuge. Jos 21:20,21 It acquired new importance as the scene of the renewed promulgation of the law, when its blessings were heard from Gerizim and its curses from Ebal, and the people bowed their heads and acknowledged Jehovah as their king and ruler. De 27:11; Jos 24:23-25 it was here Joshua assembled the people, shortly before his death, and delivered...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Shechem/

Shechem in Easton's Bible Dictionary

shoulder. (1.) The son of Hamor the Hivite (Gen. 33:19; 34). (2.) A descendant of Manasseh (Num. 26:31; Josh. 17:2). (3.) A city in Samaria (Gen. 33:18), called also Sichem (12:6), Sychem (Acts 7:16). It stood in the narrow sheltered valley between Ebal on the north and Gerizim on the south, these mountains at their base being only some 500 yards apart. Here Abraham pitched his tent and built his first altar in the Promised Land, and received the first divine promise (Gen. 12:6, 7). Here also Jacob "bought a parcel of a field at the hands of the children of Hamor" after his return from Mesopotamia, and settled with his household, which he purged from idolatry by burying the teraphim of his followers under an oak tree, which was afterwards called "the oak of the sorcerer" (Gen. 33:19; 35:4; Judg. 9:37). (See MEONENIM -T0002483.) Here too, after a while, he dug a well, which bears his name to this day (John 4:5, 39-42). To Shechem Joshua gathered all Israel "before God," and delivered to them his second parting address (Josh. 24:1-15). He "made a covenant with the people that day" at the very place where, on first entering the land, they had responded to the law from Ebal and Gerizim (Josh. 24:25), the terms of which were recorded "in the book of the law of God", i.e., in the roll of the law of Moses; and in memory of this solemn transaction a great stone was set up "under an oak" (comp. Gen. 28:18; 31:44-48; Ex. 24:4; Josh. 4:3, 8, 9), possibly the old "oak of Moreh," as a silent witness of the transaction to all coming time. Shechem became one of the cities of refuge, the central city of refuge for Western Israel (Josh. 20:7), and here the bones of Joseph were buried (24:32). Rehoboam was appointed king in Shechem (1 Kings 12:1, 19), but Jeroboam afterwards took up his residence here. This city is mentioned in connection with our Lord's conversation with the woman of Samaria (John 4:5); and thus, remaining as it does to the present day, it is one of the oldest cities of the world. It is the modern Nablus, a contraction for Neapolis, the name given to it by Vespasian. It lies about a mile and a half up the valley on its southern slope, and on the north of Gerizim, which rises about 1,100 feet above it, and is about 34 miles north of Jerusalem. It contains about 10,000 inhabitants, of whom about 160 are Samaritans and 100 Jews, the rest being Christians and Mohammedans. The site of Shechem is said to be of unrivalled beauty. Stanley says it is "the most beautiful, perhaps the only very beautiful, spot in Central Israel." Gaza, near Shechem, only mentioned 1 Chr. 7:28, has entirely disappeared. It was destroyed at the time of the Conquest, and its place was taken by Shechem. (See SYCHAR -T0003542.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Shechem/

Shechem in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("shoulder", or "upper part of the back just below the neck"); explained as if the town were on the shoulder of the heights dividing the waters that flow toward the Mediterranean on the W. and to the Jordan on the E.; or on a shoulder or ridge connected with Mounts Ebal and Gerizim. Also called SICHEM, SYCHEM, and SYCHAR (John 4:5; Joshua 20:7; Judges 9:9; 1 Kings 12:25). Mount Gerizim is close by (Judges 9:7) on the southern side, Mount Ebal on the northern side. These hills at the base are but 500 yards apart. Vespasian named it Neapolis; coins are extant with its name "Flavia Neapolis"; now Nablus by corruption. The situation is lovely; the valley runs W. with a soil of rich, black, vegetable mold, watered by fountains, sending forth numerous streams flowing W.; orchards of fruit, olive groves, gardens of vegetables, and verdure on all sides delight the eye. On the E. of Gerizim and Ebal the flue plain of Mukhna stretches from N. to S. Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18- 19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place. It lay in the rich plain of the Mukhna, and its value was increased by the well Jacob dug there. Joshua made "Shechem in Mount Ephraim" one of the six cities of refuge (Joshua 20:7). The suburbs in our Lord's days reached nearer the entrance of the valley between Gerizim and Ebal than now; for the narrative in John 4:30; John 4:35, implies that the people could be seen as they came from the town toward Jesus at the well, whereas Nablus now is more than a mile distant, and cannot be seen from that point. Josephus (B. J. 3:7, section 32) says that more than 10,000 of the inhabitants were once destroyed by the Romans, implying a much larger town and population than at present. (See DINAH; HAMOR.) frontJACOB on the massacre by Simeon and Levi, Genesis 34.) Under Abraham's oak at Shechem Jacob buried the family idols and amulets (Genesis 35:1-4). Probably too "the strange gods" or "the gods of the stranger" were those carried away by Jacob's sons from Shechem among the spoils (Genesis 35:2; Genesis 34:26-29). The charge to "be clean and change garments" may have respect to the recent slaughter of the Shechemites, which polluted those who took part in it (Blunt, Undesigned Coincidences). Shechem was for a time Ephraim's civil capital. as Shiloh was its religious capital (Judges 9:2; Judges 21:19; Joshua 24:1-25-26; 1 Kings 12:1). At the same "memorial terebinth" at Shechem the Shechemites made Abimelech king (Judges 9:6). Jotham's parable as to the trees, the vine, the fig, and the bramble, were most appropriate...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Shechem+(1)/

Shechem in Hitchcock's Bible Names

part; portion; back early in the morning

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Shechem/

Shechem Scripture - Joshua 17:2

There was also [a lot] for the rest of the children of Manasseh by their families; for the children of Abiezer, and for the children of Helek, and for the children of Asriel, and for the children of Shechem, and for the children of Hepher, and for the children of Shemida: these [were] the male children of Manasseh the son of Joseph by their families.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/17/

Shechem Scripture - 1 Chronicles 7:28

And their possessions and habitations [were], Bethel and the towns thereof, and eastward Naaran, and westward Gezer, with the towns thereof; Shechem also and the towns thereof, unto Gaza and the towns thereof:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/7/

Shechem Scripture - Genesis 34:24

And unto Hamor and unto Shechem his son hearkened all that went out of the gate of his city; and every male was circumcised, all that went out of the gate of his city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/34/

Shechem Scripture - 1 Chronicles 6:67

And they gave unto them, [of] the cities of refuge, Shechem in mount Ephraim with her suburbs; [they gave] also Gezer with her suburbs,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/6/

Shechem Scripture - Judges 21:19

Then they said, Behold, [there is] a feast of the LORD in Shiloh yearly [in a place] which [is] on the north side of Bethel, on the east side of the highway that goeth up from Bethel to Shechem, and on the south of Lebonah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/21/

Shechem Scripture - Genesis 34:20

And Hamor and Shechem his son came unto the gate of their city, and communed with the men of their city, saying,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/34/

Shechem Scripture - Numbers 26:31

And [of] Asriel, the family of the Asrielites: and [of] Shechem, the family of the Shechemites:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/26/

Shechem Scripture - Judges 9:2

Speak, I pray you, in the ears of all the men of Shechem, Whether [is] better for you, either that all the sons of Jerubbaal, [which are] threescore and ten persons, reign over you, or that one reign over you? remember also that I [am] your bone and your flesh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/9/

Shechem Scripture - Joshua 20:7

And they appointed Kedesh in Galilee in mount Naphtali, and Shechem in mount Ephraim, and Kirjatharba, which [is] Hebron, in the mountain of Judah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/20/

Shechem Scripture - Joshua 24:1

And Joshua gathered all the tribes of Israel to Shechem, and called for the elders of Israel, and for their heads, and for their judges, and for their officers; and they presented themselves before God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/24/

Shiloh in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(The most usual form is shiloh, but it appears 8 times as shilo, and 3 times as Shilow; Selo, Selom): A town in the lot of Ephraim where Israel assembled under Joshua at the close of the war of conquest (Josh 18:1). Here territory was allotted to the seven tribes who had not yet received their portions. A commission was sent out to "describe the land into seven portions"; this having been done, the inheritances were assigned by lot. Here also were assigned to the Levites their cities in the territories of the various tribes (Joshua 18 through 21). From Shiloh Reuben and Gad departed for their homes East of the Jordan; and here the tribes gathered for war against these two, having misunderstood their building of the great altar in the Jordan valley (Joshua 22). From Jdg 18:31 we learn that in the period of the Judges the house of God was in Shiloh; but when the sanctuary was moved thither from Gilgal there is no indication. The maids of Shiloh were captured by the Benjamites on the occasion of a feast, while dancing in the vineyards; this having been planned by the other tribes to provide the Benjamites with wives without involving themselves in responsibility (21:21 ff). While the house of the Lord remained here it was a place of pilgrimage (1 Sam 1:3). To Shiloh Samuel was brought and consecrated to God's service (1 Sam 1:24). The sanctuary was presided over by Eli and his wicked sons; and through Samuel the doom of their house was announced. The capture of the ark by the Philistines, the fall of Hophni and Phinehas, and the death of the aged priest and his daughter-in-law followed with startling rapidity (1 Sam 3; 4). The sanctuary in Shiloh is called a "temple" (1 Sam 1:9; 3:3) with doorpost and doors (1 Sam 1:9; 3:15). It was therefore a more durable structure than the old tent. See TABERNACLE; TEMPLE. It would appear to have been destroyed, probably by the Philistines; and we find the priests of Eli's house at Nob, where they were massacred at Saul's order (1 Sam 22:11 ff). The disaster that befell Shiloh, while we have no record of its actual occurrence, made a deep impression on the popular mind, so that the prophets could use it as an effective illustration (Ps 78:60; Jer 7:12:14; 26:6). Here the blind old prophet Ahijah was appealed...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SHILOH+(2)/

Shiloh in Naves Topical Bible

1. A name of Jesus Ge 49:10 -2. City of Ephraim, north of Beth-el, and on the highway from Beth-el to Shechem Jud 21:19 Tabernacle located at Jos 18:1-10; Jud 18:31; 21:19; 1Sa 1:3,9,21,24; 2:14; Ps 78:60; Jer 7:12 Seat of government during the time of Joshua Jos 21:1,2 The place of rendezvous for the tribes Jos 22:9,12; Jud 21:12 Eli lived at 1Sa 1:9; 4:12,13 Eli dies at 1Sa 4:18 Ahijah the prophet lives at 1Ki 14:2 Devoted men from, killed by Ishmael Jer 41:5-9

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SHILOH/

Rome Scripture - Acts 28:14

Where we found brethren, and were desired to tarry with them seven days: and so we went toward Rome.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/28/

Rome Scripture - Romans 1:15

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Romans/1/

Rome Scripture - 2 Timothy 1:17

But, when he was in Rome, he sought me out very diligently, and found [me].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Timothy/1/

Salamis in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

sal'-a-mis (Salamis): 1. Site: A town on the east coast of Cyprus, situated some 3 miles to the North of the medieval and modern Famagusta. It lay near the river Pediaeus, at the eastern extremity of the great plain of the Mesorea, which runs far into the interior of the island toward Nicosia (Lefkosia), the present capital. It possessed a good harbor and was the most populous and flourishing town of Cyprus in the Hellenic and Roman periods, carrying on a vigorous trade with the ports of Cilicia and Syria. Its population was mixed, consisting of Greek and Phoenician elements. The former, however, gave its tone and color to the city, and the chief cult and temple were those of Salaminian Zeus. 2. Early History: Tradition represented Salamis as rounded soon after the fall of Troy by Teucer, the prince of Greek archers according to the narrative of the Iliad, who named it after his home, the island of Salamis off the Attic coast. In the 6th century BC it figures as an important Hellenic city, ruled by a line of kings reputed to be descended from Teucer and strengthened by an alliance with Cyrene (Herodotus iv.162). Gorgus, who was on the throne in 498 BC, refused to join the Ionic revolt against Persia, but the townsmen, led by his brother Onesilus, took up arms in the struggle for freedom. A crushing defeat, however, inflicted udder the walls of Salamis, restored the island to its Persian overlords, who reinstated Gorgus as a vassal prince (Herodotus v.103 ff). In 449 a Greek fleet under Athenian leadership defeated the Phoenician navy, which was in the service of Persia, off Salamis; but the Athenian withdrawal which followed the battle led to a decided anti-Hellenic reaction, until the able and vigorous rule of the Salaminian prince Euagoras, who was a warm friend of the Athenians (Isocrates, Euag.) and a successful champion of Hellenism. In 306 a second great naval battle was fought off Salamis, in which Demetrius Poliorcetes defeated the forces of Ptolemy I (Soter), king of Egypt. But 11 years later the town came into Ptolemy's hands and, with the rest of the island, remained an appanage of the Egyptian kingdom until the incorporation of Cyprus in the Roman Empire (58 BC). 3. Visit of the Apostles: When Barnabas and Paul, accompanied by John Mark, set out on their 1st missionary journey, they sailed from Seleucia, the seaport of Antioch, and landed at Salamis, about 130 miles distant, as the harbor nearest to the Syrian coast. There they preached...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SALAMIS/

Salamis in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of the island of Cyprus) -Paul and Barnabas preach in Ac 13:4,5

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SALAMIS/

Salamis in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(suit), a city at the east end of the island of Cyprus, and the first place visited by Paul and Barnabas, on the first missionary journey, after leaving the mainland at Seleucia. Here alone, among all the Greek cities visited by St. Paul, we read expressly of "synagogues" in the plural, Ac 13:5 hence we conclude that there were many Jews in Cyprus. And this is in harmony with what we read elsewhere. Salamis was not far from the modern Famagousta, it was situated near a river called the Pediaeus, on low ground, which is in fact a continuation of the plain running up into the interior toward the place where Nicosia, the present capital of Cyprus, stands.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Salamis/

Salamis in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a city on the south-east coast of Cyprus (Acts 13:5), where Saul and Barnabas, on their first missionary journey, preached the word in one of the Jewish synagogues, of which there seem to have been several in that place. It is now called Famagusta.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Salamis/

Salamis in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city on a commodious harbour in the E. of Cyprus, the first place Paul and Barnabas visited after leaving the mainland at Seleucia, on their first missionary tour. The "synagogues" (implying the presence of many Jews) account for their going there first. Moreover Cyprus was Barnabas' birthplace (Acts 13:4-5). Herod the Great farmed the Cyprian copper mines, this would bring many Jews there (Josephus, Ant. 14:4, section 5). Salamis was near the river Pediaeus, on low ground. Constantine or his successor rebuilt it, and named it Constantia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Salamis/

Salamis in Hitchcock's Bible Names

shaken; test; beaten

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Salamis/

Salamis Scripture - Acts 13:5

And when they were at Salamis, they preached the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews: and they had also John to [their] minister.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Salt Sea in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

See DEAD SEA.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SALT+SEA/

Salt in Naves Topical Bible

Lot's wife turned into a pillar of Ge 19:26 -The city of Salt Jos 15:62 -The valley of salt 2Sa 8:13; 2Ki 14:7 -Salt Sea Ge 14:3; Nu 34:12; De 3:17; Jos 3:16; 12:3; 15:2 -Salt pits Zep 2:9 -All animal sacrifices were required to be seasoned with Le 2:13; Ezr 6:9; Eze 43:24; Mr 9:49 -Used in ratifying covenants Nu 18:19; 2Ch 13:5 -Elisha throws, into the pool of Jericho, to purify it 2Ki 2:20,21 -FIGURATIVE Of the saving efficacy of the ekklesia of Christ Mt 5:13; Mr 9:49,50; Lu 14:34 Of wise behavior Col 4:6

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SALT/

Salt Sea in Smiths Bible Dictionary

the usual and perhaps the most ancient name for the remarkable lake which to the western world is now generally known as the Dead Sea. I. Names.-- (1) The Salt Sea, Ge 14:3 (2) Sea of the Arabah (Authorized Version "sea of the plain," which is found in De 4:49 ); (3) The East Sea Joe 2:20 (4) The sea, Eze 47:8 (5) Sodomitish Sea, 2 Esdras; (6) Sea of Salt and Sea of Sodom, in the Talmud; (7) The Asphaltic Lake, in Josephus; (8) The name "Dead Sea" appears to have been first used in Greek by Pausanias and Galen, and in Latin (mare mortuum) by Justin xxxvi. 3,6, or rather by the older historian Trogus Pompeius (cir. B.C. 10), whose work he epitomized. (9) The Arabic name is Bahr Lut, the "Sea of Lot." II Description. --The so-called Dead Sea is the final receptacle of the river Jordan, the lowest and largest of the three lakes which interrupt the rush of its downward course. It is the deepest portion of that very deep natural fissure which runs like a furrow from the Gulf of Akabah to the range of Lebanon, and from the range of Lebanon to the extreme north of Syria. Viewed on the map, the lake is of an oblong form, of tolerably regular contour, interrupted only by a large and long peninsula which projects from the eastern shore near its southern end, and virtually divides the expanse of the water into two portions, connected by a long, narrow and somewhat devious passage. Its surface is from north to south as nearly as possible 40 geographical or 46 English miles long. Its greatest width is about 9 geographical or 10 1/2 English miles. Its area is about 250 geographical square miles. At its northern end the lake receives the stream of the Jordan; on its eastern side the Zurka Ma'in (the ancient Callirrhoe, and possibly the more ancient en-Eglaim), the Mojib (the Arnon of the Bible), and the Beni-Hemad; on the south the Kurahy or el-Ahsy; and on the west that of Ain Jidy. The depression of its surface, and the depth which it attains below that surface, combined with the absence of any outlet, render it one of the most remarkable spots on the globe. The surface of the lake in May, 1848, was 1316.7 feet below the level of the Mediterranean at Jaffa. Its depth, at about one third of its length from the north end, is 1308 feet. The water of the lake is not less remarkable than its other features. Its most obvious peculiarity is its great weight. Its specific gravity has been found to be as much as 12.28; that is to say, a gallon of it would weigh over 12 1/4 lbs., instead of 10 lbs., the weight of distilled water. Water so heavy must not only be extremely buoyant, but must possess great inertia. Its buoyancy is a common theme of remark by the travellers who have been upon it or in it. Dr. Robinson "could never swim before, either in fresh or salt water," yet here he "could sit, stand, lie or swim without difficulty." (B.R.i.506.) The remarkable weight of the water is due to the very large quantity of mineral salts which it holds in solution. Each gallon of the water, weighing 12 1/4 lbs., contains nearly 3 1/3 lbs. of matter in solution --an immense quantity when we recollect that seawater, weighing 10 1/4 lbs. per gallon, contains less than 1/2 a lb. Of this 3 1/2 lbs. nearly 1 lb. is common salt (chloride of sodium), about 2 lbs. chloride of magnesium, and less than 3 a lb. chloride of calcium (or muriate of lime). The most usual ingredient is bromide of magnesium, which exists in truly extraordinary quantity. It has been long supposed that no life whatever existed in the lake; but recent facts show that some inferior organizations do find a home even in these salt and acrid waters. The statements of ancient travellers and geographers to the effect that no living creature...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sea,+The+Salt/

Salt Sea in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(Josh. 3:16). See DEAD SEA -T0000991.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Salt+Sea/

Salt Sea in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Now the "Dead Sea". Midway in the great valley stretching from Mount Hermon to the gulf of Akabah (Genesis 14:3; Numbers 34:3; Numbers 34:12). "The sea of the plain" (Arabah): Deuteronomy 3:17; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 3:16. "The East Sea" (Ezekiel 47:8; Ezekiel 47:10-11; Joel 2:20). "The former sea," in opposition to "the hinder sea," i.e. the Mediterranean, because in taking the four points of the sky the spectator faced the E., having it in front of him and the W. behind him (Zechariah 14:8). It is 40 geographical miles long by nine to nine and three quarters broad. Its surface is 1,292 ft. (or, according to Lynch, 1,316; it varies greatly at different seasons) below the Mediterranean level. Its greatest depth in the northern part is 1,308 ft. Its intense saltness, specific gravity, and buoyancy, are well known. The saltness is due to masses of fossil salt in a mountain on its S.W. border, and to rapid evaporation of the fresh water which flows into it. Neither animals nor vegetables live in it. Its shores are encrusted with salt. Earthquakes (as in 1834 and 1837) throw up large quantities of bitumen, detached from the bottom, upon the southern shore. The great depth of the northern division does not extend to the southern. It was observed by Mr. Tyrwhitt Drake that the bottom is still subsiding. At the southern end the fords between Lisan and the western shore are now impassable, though but three feet deep some years ago; again the causeway between the Rijm el Bahr and the mainland has been submerged for 12 years, though previously often dry. Dr. Tristram's theory seems probable, that the valley was formed by a depression of the strata subsequent to the English chalk period. The area was filled by a chain of large lakes reaching to the sea. The depression continuing, the heat and the consequent evaporation increased, until there remained only the present three lakes, Merom, Galilee, and the Dead Sea which depends on evaporation alone for maintaining its level. Conder has traced the old shore lines of the ancient great lakes. The southern bay is shallow, and the shores marshy. It occupies probably what was originally the plain of Jordan, the vale of Siddim. Possibly the Jordan originally flowed on through the Arabah into the gulf of Akabah. The southern part of the sea, abounding in salt, bitumen, sulphur, and nitre, was probably formed at a recent date, and answers to the description of the valley of Siddim, "full of slime pits" (Genesis 14:10), and to the destruction of Sodom; etc., by fire and brimstone, and to the turning of Lot's wife into a pillar of salt. Scripture, however, nowhere says that Sodom, etc., were immersed in the sea, but that they were overthrown by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6). Josephus speaks of Sodomitis as burnt up, and as adjoining the lake Asphaltitis. Ancient testimony, the recent formation of the sea, its bituminous, saline, volcanic aspect, the traditional names (Usdum), and the traditional site of Zoar (called by Josephus Zoar of Arabia), the hill of salt traditionally made Lot's wife, all favor the southern site for Sodom, etc. Genesis 13:10 is not to be pressed further than to mean that Lot from between Bethel and Ai saw enough to arrive at the conclusion that the Ciccar ("circuit")...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sea,+the+salt/

Salt Sea Scripture - Joshua 12:3

And from the plain to the sea of Chinneroth on the east, and unto the sea of the plain, [even] the salt sea on the east, the way to Bethjeshimoth; and from the south, under Ashdothpisgah:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/12/

Salt Sea Scripture - Joshua 15:5

And the east border [was] the salt sea, [even] unto the end of Jordan. And [their] border in the north quarter [was] from the bay of the sea at the uttermost part of Jordan:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Salt Sea Scripture - Joshua 18:19

And the border passed along to the side of Bethhoglah northward: and the outgoings of the border were at the north bay of the salt sea at the south end of Jordan: this [was] the south coast.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/18/

Salt Sea Scripture - Deuteronomy 3:17

The plain also, and Jordan, and the coast [thereof], from Chinnereth even unto the sea of the plain, [even] the salt sea, under Ashdothpisgah eastward.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/3/

Salt Sea Scripture - Joshua 3:16

That the waters which came down from above stood [and] rose up upon an heap very far from the city Adam, that [is] beside Zaretan: and those that came down toward the sea of the plain, [even] the salt sea, failed, [and] were cut off: and the people passed over right against Jericho.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/3/

Salt Sea Scripture - Numbers 34:12

And the border shall go down to Jordan, and the goings out of it shall be at the salt sea: this shall be your land with the coasts thereof round about.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/34/

Salt Sea Scripture - Joshua 15:2

And their south border was from the shore of the salt sea, from the bay that looketh southward:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Salt Sea Scripture - Genesis 14:3

All these were joined together in the vale of Siddim, which is the salt sea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/14/

Samaria in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

sa-ma'-ri-a, (shomeron; Samareia, Semeron, and other forms): (1) Shechem was the first capital of the Northern Kingdom (1 Ki 12:25). Jeroboam seems later to have removed the royal residence to Tirzah (1 Ki 14:17). After the brief reigns of Elah and Zimri came that of Omri, who reigned 6 years in Tirzah, then he purchased the hill of Samaria and built a city there, which was thenceforward the metropolis of the kingdom of Israel (1 Ki 16:24). Here the hill and the city are said to have been named after Shemer, the original owner of the land. There is nothing intrinsically improbable in this. It might naturally be derived from shamar, and the name in the sense of "outlook" would fitly apply to a city in such a commanding position. The residence, it was also the burying-place, of the kings of Israel (1 Ki 16:28; 22:37; 2 Ki 10:35; 13:9,13; 14:16). Toward the western edge of the Ephraimite uplands there is a broad fertile hollow called Wady esh-Sha`ir, "valley of barley." From the midst of it rises an oblong hill to a height of over 300 ft., with a level top. The sides are steep, especially to the Samaria. The greatest length is from East to West. The surrounding mountains on three sides are much higher, and are well clad with olives and vineyards. To the West the hills are lower, and from the crest a wide view is obtained over the Plain of Sharon, with the yellow ribbon of sand that marks the coast line, and the white foam on the tumbling billows; while away beyond stretch the blue waters of the Mediterranean. On the eastern end of the hill, surrounded by olive and cactus, is the modern village of Sebastiyeh, under which a low neck of land connects the hill with the eastern slopes. The position is one of great charm and beauty; and in days of ancient warfare it was one of remarkable strength. While it was overlooked from three sides, the battlements crowning the steep slopes were too far off to be reached by missiles from the only artillery known in those times--the sling and the catapult. For besiegers to attempt an assault at arms was only to court disaster. The methods adopted by her enemies show that they relied on famine to do their work for them (2 Ki 6:24 f, etc.). Omri displayed excellent taste and good judgment in the choice he made. The city wall can be traced in almost its entire length. Recent excavations conducted by American archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of Omri's palace, with remains of the work of Ahab and of Herod (probably here was Ahab's ivory palace), on the western end of the hill, while on the western slope the gigantic gateway, flanked by massive towers, has been exposed to view. Under the influence of Jezebel, Samaria naturally became a center of idolatrous...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SAMARIA,+CITY+OF/

Samaria in Naves Topical Bible

1. City of, built by Omri 1Ki 16:24 Capitol of the kingdom of the ten tribes 1Ki 16:29; 22:51; 2Ki 13:1,10; 15:8 Besieged by Ben-hadad 1Ki 20; 2Ki 6:24-33; 7 The king of Syria is led into, by Elisha, who miraculously blinds him and his army 2Ki 6:8-23 Ahab ruled in See AHAB See JEZEBEL Besieged by Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, for three years; captured; the people carried away to Halah and Habor, cities of the Medes 2Ki 17:5,6; 18:9-11 Idolatry of 1Ki 16:32; 2Ki 13:6 Temple of, destroyed 2Ki 10:17-28; 23:19 Paul and Barnabas preach in Ac 15:3 Visited by Philip, Peter, and John Ac 8:5-25 -2. Country of Isa 7:9 Foreign colonies distributed among the cities of, by the king of Assyria 2Ki 17:24-41; Ezr 4:9,10 Roads through, from Judaea into Galilee Lu 17:11; Joh 4:3-8 Jesus travels through Joh 4:1-42 Jesus heals lepers in Lu 17:11-19 The Good Samaritan from Lu 10:33-35 No dealings between the Jews and the inhabitants of Joh 4:9 Samaritans were expecting the Messiah Joh 4:25 Disciples made from the inhabitants of Joh 4:39-42; Ac 8:5-8,14-17,25 Jesus forbids the apostles to preach in the cities of Mt 10:5

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SAMARIA/

Samaria in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(watch mountain). This city is situated 30 miles north of Jerusalem and about six miles to the northwest of Shechem, in a wide basin-shaped valley, six miles in diameter, encircled with high hills, almost on the edge of the great plain which borders upon the Mediterranean. In the centre of this basin, which is on a lower level than the valley of Shechem, rises a less elevated hill, with steep yet accessible sides and a long fiat top. This hill was chosen by Omri as the site of the capital of the kingdom of Israel. He "bought the hill of Samaria of Shemer for two talents of silver, and built on the hill, and called the name of the city which he built, after the name of the owner of the hill, Samaria." 1Ki 16:23,24 From the that of Omri's purchase, B.C. 925, Samaria retained its dignity as the capital of the ten tribes, and the name is given to the northern kingdom as well as to the city. Ahab built a temple to Baal there. 1Ki 16:32,33 It was twice besieged by the Syrians, in B.C. 901, 1Ki 20:1 and in B.C. 892, 2Ki 6:24-7, 2Ki 6:20 but on both occasions the siege was ineffectual. The possessor of Samaria was considered de facto king of Israel. 2Ki 15:13,14 In B.C. 721 Samaria was taken, after a siege of three years, by Shalmaneser king of Assyria, 2Ki 18:9,10 and the kingdom of the ten tribes was put an end to. Some years afterward the district of which Samaria was the centre was repeopled by Esarhaddon. Alexander the Great took the city, killed a large portion of the inhabitants, and suffered the remainder to set it at Shechem. He replaced them by a colony of Syro-Macedonians who occupied the city until the time of John Hyrcanus, who took it after a year's siege, and did his best to demolish it entirely. (B.C. 109.) It was rebuilt and greatly embellished by Herod the Great. He called it Sebaste=Augusta, after the name of his patron, Augustus Caesar. The wall around it was 2 1/2 miles long, and in the centre of the city was a park 900 feet square containing a magnificent temple dedicated to Caesar. In the New Testament the city itself does not appear to be mentioned; but rather a portion of the district to which, even in older times it had extended its name. Mt 10:5; Joh 4:4,5 At this clay the city is represented by a small village retaining few vestiges of the past except its name, Sebustiyeh, an Arabic corruption of Sebaste. Some architectural remains it has, partly of Christian construction or adaptation, as the ruined church of St. John the Baptist, partly, perhaps, traces of Idumaean magnificence, St. Jerome, whose acquaintance with Israel imparts a sort of probability to the tradition which prevailed so strongly in later days, asserts that Sebaste, which he invariably identifies with Samaria was the place in which St. John the Baptist was imprisoned and suffered death. He also makes it the burial-place of the prophets Elisha and Obadiah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Samaria/

Samaria in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a watch-mountain or a watch-tower. In the heart of the mountains of Israel, a few miles north-west of Shechem, stands the "hill of Shomeron," a solitary mountain, a great "mamelon." It is an oblong hill, with steep but not inaccessible sides, and a long flat top. Omri, the king of Israel, purchased this hill from Shemer its owner for two talents of silver, and built on its broad summit the city to which he gave the name of "Shomeron", i.e., Samaria, as the new capital of his kingdom instead of Tirzah (1 Kings 16:24). As such it possessed many advantages. Here Omri resided during the last six years of his reign. As the result of an unsuccessful war with Syria, he appears to have been obliged to grant to the Syrians the right to "make streets in Samaria", i.e., probably permission to the Syrian merchants to carry on their trade in the Israelite capital. This would imply the existence of a considerable Syrian population. "It was the only great city of Israel created by the sovereign. All the others had been already consecrated by patriarchal tradition or previous possession. But Samaria was the choice of Omri alone. He, indeed, gave to the city which he had built the name of its former owner, but its especial connection with himself as its founder is proved by the designation which it seems Samaria bears in Assyrian inscriptions, Beth-khumri ('the house or palace of Omri').", Stanley. Samaria was frequently besieged. In the days of Ahab, Benhadad II. came up against it with thirty-two vassal kings, but was defeated with a great slaughter (1 Kings 20:1-21). A second time, next year, he assailed it; but was again utterly routed, and was compelled to surrender to Ahab (20:28-34), whose army, as compared with that of Benhadad, was no more than "two little flocks of kids." In the days of Jehoram this Benhadad again laid siege to Samaria, during which the city was reduced to the direst extremities. But just when success seemed to be within their reach, they suddenly broke up the seige, alarmed by a mysterious noise of chariots and horses and a great army, and fled, leaving their camp with all its contents behind them. The famishing inhabitants of the city were soon relieved...

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Samaria/

Samaria in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("a watch mountain".) The oblong terraced hill in the center of a basinshaped, valley, a continuation of the Shethem valley, six miles N.W. of Shechem. The owner, Shemer, sold it for two silver talents to Omri king of Israel (925 B.C.), who built on it a city and called it after Shomer (1 Kings 16:23-24). Shechem previously had been the capital, Tirzah the court residence in summer (1 Kings 15:21; 1 Kings 15:33; 1 Kings 16:1-18). The situation combines strength, fertility and beauty (Josephus, Ant. 15:8, section 5; B.J. 1:21, section 2). It is 600 ft. high, surrounded with terraced hills, clad with figs and olives. There is abundant water in the valley; but the city, like Jerusalem, is dependent on rain cisterns. The view is charming: to the N. and E. lie its own rich valleys; to the W. fertile Sharon and the blue Mediterranean. (On the "glorious beauty" of Ephraim (Samaria), Isaiah 28:1, see MEALS.) Its strength enabled it to withstand severe sieges by the Syrians (1 Kings 20; 2 Kings 6; 7). Finally it fell before Shalmaneser and Sargon, after a three years' siege (2 Kings 18:9-12), 721 B.C. Called from its Baal worship, introduced by Ahab, "the city of the house of Ahab" (1 Kings 16:32-33; 2 Kings 10:25). Alexander the Great replaced its inhabitants with Syro Macedonians. John Hyrcanus (109 B.C.) destroyed the city after a 12 months' siege (Josephus, Ant. 13:10, section 2-3). Herod the Great rebuilt and adorned it, naming it Sebaste from Sebastos, Greek for Augustus, his patron (Ant. 14:5, section 3; 15:8, section 5; B.J. 1:20, section 3, 21, section 2). The woman of Samaria and several of her townsmen (John 4) were the firstfruits gathered into Christ; the fuller harvest followed under Philip the evangelist deacon (Acts 8, compare John 4:35). Septimius Severus planted a Roman colony there in the third century A.D.; but politically it became secondary to Caesarea. Ecclesiastically it was of more importance; and Marius its bishop signed himself "Maximus Sebastenus" at the council of Nice, A.D. 325. The Mahometans took it, A.D. 614. The Crusaders established a Latin bishop there. Now Sebustieh; its houses of stone are taken from ancient materials, but irregularly placed; the inhabitants are rude but industrious. The ruin of the church of John the Baptist marks the traditional place of his burial; the original structure is attributed to Helena, Constantine's mother; but the present building, except the eastern Greek end, is of later style: 153 ft. long inside, 75 broad, and a porch 10 ft. wide. Within is a Turkish tomb under which by steps you descend to a vault with tessellated floor, and five niches for the dead, the central one being alleged to have been that of John (?). Fifteen limestone columns stand near the hill top, two others lie on the ground, in two rows, 32 paces apart. Another colonnade, on the N. side of the hill, in a ravine, is arranged in a quadrangle, 196 paces long and 64 broad. On the W.S.W. are many columns, erect or prostrate, extending a third of a mile, and ending in a heap of ruins; each column 16 ft. high, 6 ft. in circumference at the base, 5 ft. at the top: probably...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Samaria/

Samaria in Hitchcock's Bible Names

watch-mountain

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Samaria/

Samaria Scripture - Ezekiel 16:55

When thy sisters, Sodom and her daughters, shall return to their former estate, and Samaria and her daughters shall return to their former estate, then thou and thy daughters shall return to your former estate.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Samaria Scripture - Ezekiel 16:53

When I shall bring again their captivity, the captivity of Sodom and her daughters, and the captivity of Samaria and her daughters, then [will I bring again] the captivity of thy captives in the midst of them:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Samaria Scripture - Ezekiel 16:51

Neither hath Samaria committed half of thy sins; but thou hast multiplied thine abominations more than they, and hast justified thy sisters in all thine abominations which thou hast done.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Samaria Scripture - 1 Kings 20:34

And [Benhadad] said unto him, The cities, which my father took from thy father, I will restore; and thou shalt make streets for thee in Damascus, as my father made in Samaria. Then [said Ahab], I will send thee away with this covenant. So he made a covenant with him, and sent him away.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/20/

Samaria Scripture - Ezekiel 16:46

And thine elder sister [is] Samaria, she and her daughters that dwell at thy left hand: and thy younger sister, that dwelleth at thy right hand, [is] Sodom and her daughters.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/16/

Samaria Scripture - Ezekiel 23:4

And the names of them [were] Aholah the elder, and Aholibah her sister: and they were mine, and they bare sons and daughters. Thus [were] their names; Samaria [is] Aholah, and Jerusalem Aholibah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/23/

Samaria Scripture - 1 Kings 16:29

And in the thirty and eighth year of Asa king of Judah began Ahab the son of Omri to reign over Israel: and Ahab the son of Omri reigned over Israel in Samaria twenty and two years.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/16/

Samaria Scripture - Amos 3:9

Publish in the palaces at Ashdod, and in the palaces in the land of Egypt, and say, Assemble yourselves upon the mountains of Samaria, and behold the great tumults in the midst thereof, and the oppressed in the midst thereof.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Amos/3/

Samaria Scripture - 2 Kings 23:18

And he said, Let him alone; let no man move his bones. So they let his bones alone, with the bones of the prophet that came out of Samaria.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/23/

Samaria Scripture - Obediah 1:19

And [they of] the south shall possess the mount of Esau; and [they of] the plain the Philistines: and they shall possess the fields of Ephraim, and the fields of Samaria: and Benjamin [shall possess] Gilead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Obediah/1/

Sardis in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

sar'-dis (Sardeis): Sardis is of special interest to the student of Herodotus and Xenophon, for there Artaphernes, the brother of Darius, lived, and from there Xerxes invaded Greece and Cyrus marched against his brother Artaxerxes; it is also of interest to the student of early Christian history as the home of one of the Seven Churches of Rev (1:11; 3:1 ff). It was moreover one of the oldest and most important cities of Asia Minor, and until 549 BC, the capital of the kingdom of Lydia. It stood on the northern slope of Mt. Tmolus; its acropolis occupied one of the spurs of the mountain. At the base flowed the river Pactolus which served as a moat, rendering the city practically impregnable. Through the failure to watch, however, the acropolis had been successfully scaled in 549 BC by a Median soldier, and in 218 by a Cretan (compare Rev 3:2,3). Because of its strength during the Persian period, the satraps here made their homes. However, the city was burned by the Ionians in 501 BC, but it was quickly rebuilt and regained its importance. In 334 BC it surrendered to Alexander the Great who gave it independence, but its period of independence was brief, for 12 years later in 322 BC it was taken by Antigonus. In 301 BC, it fell into the possession of the Seleucidan kings who made it the residence of their governor. It became free again in 190 BC, when it formed a part of the empire of Pergamos, and later of the Roman province of Asia. In 17 AD, when it was destroyed by an earthquake, the Roman emperor Tiberius remitted the taxes of the people and rebuilt the city, and in his honor the citizens of that and of neighboring towns erected a large monument, but Sardis never recovered its former importance (compare Rev 3:12). Again in 295 AD, after the Roman province of Asia was broken up, Sardis became the capital of Lydia, and during the early Christian age it was the home of a bishop. The city continued to flourish until 1402, when it was so completely destroyed by Tamerlane that it was never rebuilt. Among the ruins there now stands a small village called Sert, a corruption of its ancient name. The ruins may be reached by rail from Smyrna, on the way to Philadelphia. The ancient city was noted for its fruits and wool, and for its temple of the goddess Cybele, whose worship resembled that of Diana of Ephesus. Its wealth was also partly due to the gold which was found in the sand of the river Pactolus, and it was here that gold and silver coins were first struck. During the Roman period its coins formed a beautiful series, and are found in abundance by the peasants who till the surrounding fields. The ruins of the buildings which stood at the base of the hill have now been nearly buried by the dirt washed down from above. The hill upon which the acropolis stood measures 950 ft. high: the triple walls still surround it. The more imposing of the ruins are on the lower slope of the hill, and among them the temple of Cybele is the most...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SARDIS/

Sardis in Naves Topical Bible

(A city in Asia Minor) -One of the seven congregations in Re 1:11; 3:1-4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SARDIS/

Sardis in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a city of Asia Minor and capital of Lydia, situated about two miles to the south of the river Hermus, just below the range of Tmolus, on a spur of which its acropolis was built. It was 60 miles northeast of Smyrna. It was the ancient residence of the kings of Lydia, among them Croesus, proverbial for his immense wealth. Cyrus is said to have taken $600,000,000 worth of treasure form the city when he captured it, B.C. 548. Sardis was in very early times, both from the extremely fertile character of the neighboring region and from its convenient position, a commercial mart of importance. The art of dyeing wool is said to have been invented there. In the year 214 B.C. it was taken and sacked by the army of Antiochus the Great. Afterward it passed under the dominion of the kings of Pergamos. Its productive soil must always have continued a source of wealth; but its importance as a central mart appears to have diminished from the time of the invasion of Asia by Alexander. The massive temple of Cybele still bears witness in its fragmentary remains to the wealth and architectural skill of the people that raised it. On the north side of the acropolis, overlooking the valley of the Hermus, is a theatre near 400 feet in diameter, attached to a stadium of about 1000. There are still considerable remains of the ancient city at Sert- Kalessi. Travellers describe the appearance of the locality as that of complete solitude. The only passage in which it is mentioned in the Bible is Re 3:1-6

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sardis/

Sardis in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the metropolis of Lydia in Asia Minor. It stood on the river Pactolus, at the foot of mount Tmolus. Here was one of the seven Asiatic churches (Rev. 3:1-6). It is now a ruin called Sert-Kalessi.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/S/Sardis/

Sardis in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Capital of Lydia, in Asia Minor; on the Pactolus, at the root of Mount Tmolus. Northward is a view up the Hermus valley. Southward stand two beautiful Ionic columns of the temple of Cybele, six feet and one third in diameter, 35 ft. below the capital; the soil is 25 ft. above the pavement. The citadel is on a steep, high hill. So steep was its S. wall that Croesus the last king omitted to guard it; and one of Cyrus' Persian soldiers, seeing a Lydian descend by cut steps to regain his helmet, thereby led a body of Persians into the acropolis. Now an unhealthy desert; not a human being dwelt in the once populous Sardis in 1850. The senate house (gerusia), called Croesus' house, lies W. of the acropolis. One hall is 156 ft. long by 43 broad, with walls 10 ft. thick. There are remains of a theater, 400 ft. in diameter, and a stadium, 1,000; and of two churches, the latter constructed of fragments of Cybele's temple. Now Sart. Famed for the golden sands of Pactolus, and as a commercial entrepot. In Sardis and Laodicea alone of the seven addressed in Revelation 2; 3; there was no conflict with foes within or without. Not that either had renounced apparent opposition to the world, but neither so faithfully witnessed by word and example as to "torment them that dwell on the earth" (Revelation 11:10). Smyrna and Philadelphia, the most afflicted, alone receive unmixed praise. Sardis and Laodicea, the most wealthy, receive little besides censure. Sardis "had a name that she lived and was dead" (Revelation 3:1; 1 Timothy 5:6; 2 Timothy 3:5; Titus 1:16; Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5; Ephesians 5:14). "Become (Greek) watchful" or "waking" (Greek), what thou art not now. "Strengthen the things which remain," i.e. the few graces which in thy spiritual slumber are not yet extinct, but "ready to die"; so that Sardis was not altogether "dead." Her works were not "filled up in full complement (pepleromena) in the sight of My God" (so the Siniaticus, Alexandrinus, and Vaticanus manuscripts). Christ's God is therefore our God; His judgment is the Father's judgment (John 20:17; John 5:22). He threatens Sardis if she will not watch or wake up, "He will come on her as a thief"; as the Greek proverb, "the feet of the avenging deities are shod with wool," expressing the noiseless nearness of God's judgments when supposed far off. Sardis had nevertheless "a few names" in the book of life, known by the Lord as His (John 10:3). The gracious Lord does not overlook exceptional saints among masses of professors. Their reward and their character accord. "They have not defiled their garments," so "they shall walk (the best attitude for showing grace to advantage) with Me in white, for they are worthy," namely, with Christ's worthiness "put on them" (Revelation 7:14; Ezekiel 16:14). The state of grace now, and that of glory hereafter, harmonize. Christ's rebuke was not in vain. Melito, bishop of Sardis in the second century, was eminent for piety; he visited Israel to investigate concerning the Old Testament canon, and wrote an epistle on it (Eusebius 4:26; Jerome Catal. Script. Ecclesiastes 24). In A.D. 17, under the emperor Tiberius, an earthquake desolated Sardis and 11 other cities of Asia; Rome remitted its taxes for five years, and the emperor gave a benefaction from the privy purse.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/S/Sardis/

Sardis in Hitchcock's Bible Names

prince of joy

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Sardis/

Sardis Scripture - Revelation 3:1

And unto the angel of the church in Sardis write; These things saith he that hath the seven Spirits of God, and the seven stars; I know thy works, that thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/3/

Sardis Scripture - Revelation 1:11

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Sardis Scripture - Revelation 3:4

Thou hast a few names even in Sardis which have not defiled their garments; and they shall walk with me in white: for they are worthy.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/3/

Sea of Galilee in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(he thalassa tes Galilaias): 1. The Name: This is the name 5 times given in the New Testament (Mt 4:18; 15:29; Mk 1:16; 7:31; Jn 6:1) to the sheet of water which is elsewhere called "the sea of Tiberias" (Jn 21:1; compare 6:1); "the lake of Gennesaret" (Lk 5:1); "the sea" (Jn 6:16, etc.), and "the lake" (Lk 5:1, etc.). The Old Testament names were "sea of Chinnereth" (yam-kinnereth: Nu 34:11; Dt 3:17; Josh 13:27; 19:35), and "sea of Chinneroth" (yam-kineroth: Josh 12:3; compare 11:2; 1 Ki 15:20). In 1 Macc 11:67 the sea is called "the water of Gennesar" (the Revised Version (British and American) "Gennesareth"). It had begun to be named from the city so recently built on its western shore even in New Testament times (Jn 21:1; 6:1); and by this name, slightly modified, it is known to this day--Bachr Tabariyeh. 2. General Description: The sea lies in the deep trough of the Jordan valley, almost due East of the Bay of Acre. The surface is 680 ft. below the level of the Mediterranean. It varies in depth from 130 ft. to 148 ft., being deepest along the course of the Jordan (Barrois, PEFS, 1894, 211-20). From the point where the Jordan enters in the North to its exit in the South is about 13 miles. The greatest breadth is in the North, from el- Mejdel to the mouth of Wady Semak being rather over 7 miles. It gradually narrows toward the South, taking the shape of a gigantic pear, with a decided bulge to the West. The water of the lake is clear and sweet. The natives use it for all purposes, esteeming it light and pleasant. They refuse to drink from the Jordan, alleging that "who drinks Jordan drinks fever." Seen from the mountains the broad sheet appears a beautiful blue; so that, in the season of greenery, it is no exaggeration to describe it as a sapphire in a setting of emerald. It lights up the landscape as the eye does the human face; and it is often spoken of as "the eye of Galilee." To one descending from Mt. Tabor and approaching the edge of the great hollow, on a bright spring day, when the land has already assumed its fairest garments, the view of the sea, as it breaks upon the vision in almost its whole extent, is one never to be forgotten. The mountains on the East and on the West rise to about 2,000 ft. The heights of Naphtali, piled up in the North, seem to culminate only in the snowy summit of Great Hermon. If the waters are still, the shining splendors of the mountain may be seen mirrored in the blue depths. Round the greater part of the lake there is a broad pebbly beach, with a sprinkling of small shells. On the sands along the shore from el-Mejdel to `Ain et-Tineh these shells are so numerous as to cause a white glister in the sunlight. The main formation of the surrounding district is limestone. It is overlaid with lava; and here and there around the lake there are outcrops of basalt through the limestone. At eT- Tabgha in the North, at `Ain el Fuliyeh, South of el-Mejdel, and on the shore, about 2 miles South of modern Tiberias, there are strong hot springs. These things, together with the frequent, and sometimes terribly destructive, earthquakes, sufficiently attest the volcanic character of the region. The soil on the level parts around the sea is exceedingly fertile. See GENNESARET, LAND OF. Naturally the temperature...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/G/GALILEE,+SEA+OF/

Sea of Galilee in Naves Topical Bible

1. The northern district of Israel A city of refuge in Jos 20:7; 21:32; 1Ch 6:76 Cities in, given to Hiram 1Ki 9:11,12 Taken by king of Assyria 2Ki 15:29 Prophecy concerning Isa 9:1; Mt 4:15 Called GALILEE OF THE NATIONS Isa 9:1 Herod (Antipas), tetrarch of Mr 6:21; Lu 3:1; 23:6,7 Jesus resides in Mt 17:22; 19:1; Joh 7:1,9 Teaching and miracles of Jesus in Mt 4:23,25; 15:29-31; Mr 1:14 People of, receive Jesus Joh 4:45,53 Disciples were chiefly from Ac 1:11; 2:7 Women from, ministered to Jesus Mt 27:55,56; Mr 15:41; Lu 23:49,55 Jesus appeared to his disciples in, after his resurrection Mt 26:32; 28:7,10,16,17; Mr 14:28; 16:7; Joh 21 Routes from, to Judaea Jud 21:19; Joh 4:3-5 Dialect of Mr 14:70 Called GENNESARET Mt 14:34; Mr 6:53 Congregations in Ac 9:31 -2. Sea (Lake) of Galilee Called SEA OF TIBERIAS Joh 21:1 Called LAKE OF GENNESARET Lu 5:1 Called SEA OF CHINNERETH Nu 34:11; De 3:17; Jos 13:27 Called SEA OF CHINNEROTH Jos 12:3 Jesus calls disciples on the shore of Mt 4:18-22; Lu 5:1-11 Jesus teaches from a ship on Mt 13:1-3 Miracles of Jesus on Mt 8:24-32; 14:22-33; 17:27; Mr 4:37-39; Lu 5:1-9; 8:22-24; Joh 21:1-11

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/G/GALILEE/

Sea of Galilee in Smiths Bible Dictionary

So called from the province of Galilee, which bordered on the western side. Mt 4:18 It was also called the "Sea of Tiberias," from the celebrated city of that name. Joh 6:1 At its northwestern angle was a beautiful and fertile plain called "Gennesaret," and from that it derived the name of "Lake of Gennesaret." Lu 5:1 It was called in the Old Testament "the Sea of Chinnereth" or "Cinneroth," Nu 34:11; Jos 12:3 from a town of that name which stood on or near its shore. Jos 19:35 Its modern name is Bahr Tubariyeh. Most of our Lord's public life was spent in the environs of this sea. The surrounding region was then the most densely peopled in all Israel. no less than nine very populous cities stood on the very shores of the lake. The Sea of Galilee is of an oval long and six broad. It is 60 miles northeast of Jerusalem and 27 east of the Mediterranean Sea. The river Jordan enters it at its northern end and passes out at its southern end. In fact the bed of the lake is just a lower section of the Great Jordan valley. Its more remarkable feature is its deep depression, being no less than 700 feet below the level of the ocean. The scenery is bleak and monotonous, being surrounded by a high and almost unbroken wall of hills, on account of which it is exposed to frequent sudden and violent storms. The great depression makes the climate of the shores almost tropical. This is very sensibly felt by the traveller in going down from the plains of Galilee. In summer the heat is intense, and even in early spring the air has something of an Egyptian balminess. The water of the lake is sweet, cool and transparent; and as the beach is everywhere pebbly is has a beautiful sparkling look. It abounds in fish now as in ancient times. There were large fisheries on the lake, and much commerce was carried on upon it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/G/Galilee,+Sea+of/

Sea of Galilee in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(Matt. 4:18; 15:29), is mentioned in the Bible under three other names. (1.) In the Old Testament it is called the "sea of Chinnereth" (Num. 34:11; Josh. 12:3; 13:27), as is supposed from its harp-like shape. (2). The "lake of Gennesareth" once by Luke (5:1), from the flat district lying on its west coast. (3.) John (6:1; 21:1) calls it the "sea of Tiberias" (q.v.). The modern Arabs retain this name, Bahr Tabariyeh. This lake is 12 1/2 miles long, and from 4 to 7 1/2 broad. Its surface is 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. Its depth is from 80 to 160 feet. The Jordan enters it 10 1/2 miles below the southern extremity of the Huleh Lake, or about 26 1/2 miles from its source. In this distance of 26 1/2 miles there is a fall in the river of 1,682 feet, or of more than 60 feet to the mile. It is 27 miles east of the Mediterranean, and about 60 miles north-east of Jerusalem. It is of an oval shape, and abounds in fish. Its present appearance is thus described: "The utter loneliness and absolute stillness of the scene are exceedingly impressive. It seems as if all nature had gone to rest, languishing under the scorching heat. How different it was in the days of our Lord! Then all was life and bustle along the shores; the cities and villages that thickly studded them resounded with the hum of a busy population; while from hill-side and corn-field came the cheerful cry of shepherd and ploughman. The lake, too, was dotted with dark fishing-boats and spangled with white sails. Now a mournful, solitary silence reigns over sea and shore. The cities are in ruins!" This sea is chiefly of interest as associated with the public ministry of our Lord. Capernaum, "his own city" (Matt. 9:1), stood on its shores. From among the fishermen who plied their calling on its waters he chose Peter and his brother Andrew, and James and John, to be disciples, and sent them forth to be "fishers of men" (Matt. 4:18,22; Mark 1:16-20; Luke 5: 1-11). He stilled its tempest, saying to the storm that swept over it, "Peace, be still" (Matt. 8:23-27; Mark 7:31-35); and here also he showed himself after his resurrection to his disciples (John 21). "The Sea of Galilee is indeed the cradle of the gospel. The subterranean fires of nature prepared a lake basin, through which a river afterwards ran, keeping its waters always fresh. In this basin a vast quantity of shell-fish swarmed, and multiplied to such an extent that they formed the food of an extraordinary profusion of fish. The great variety and abundance of the fish in the lake attracted to its shores a larger and more varied population than existed elsewhere in Israel, whereby this secluded district was brought into contact with all parts of the world. And this large and varied population, with access to all nations and countries, attracted the Lord Jesus, and induced him to make this spot the centre of his public ministry."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/G/Galilee,+Sea+of/

Sea of Galilee in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(Matthew 4:18; Mark 7:31; John 6:1). So called from its washing the E. side of Galilee. In Luke 5:1 "the sea of Gennesaret," called so from the fertile plain of Gennesurer at its N.W. angle, three and a half miles long by two and a half broad (Matthew 14:34). In Old Testament "the sea of Chinnereth" or Cinneroth, from the town so named on its shore (Joshua 19:35), of which Gennesaret is probably the corruption, though others derive it from gannah, a "garden," and Sarown, a plain between Tabor and the lake. "The sea of Tiberias" is another designation, from the city (John 6:1). All its names were drawn from places on the western side. Now Bahr Tubariyeh (Tiberius, S.W. of the lake). Close to it was "His own city" Capernaum (Matthew 4:13). Nine cities stood on the shores of the lake, of which only two are now inhabited, namely, Magdala, consisting of a few mud huts, and Tiberias, sadly changed from its ancient prosperity. Silence now reigns where formerly the din of industry was heard. On its shore Jesus called His first disciples (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 9:9; Luke 5:1-11; John 1:43, etc.). The bed of the lake is but a lower section of the great Jordan valley. Its depression is 653 ft. below the level of the Mediterranean, according to Lt. Lynch. Its length is about 13 miles, its breadth is about five or six. The view from the Nazareth road to Tiberias is beautiful. The hills from the eastern side rise apparently out of the water with a uniform slope, to the height of 2,000 ft., destitute of verdure, and shut in the lake; while far to the N. is seen snowy Hermon. The eastern hills, which are flat along the summit, are the wall that supports the table land of Bashan; from which on the N. there is a gradual descent to the valley of the Jordan, and then a rise to a plateau skirting the mountains of upper Galilee. The hills on the W., except at Khan Minyeh, where there is a small cliff, are recessed from the shore. On a western recess stands Tiberias. The whole basin betrays its volcanic origin, which also accounts for the warm spring at Tiberius The cliffs are hard porous basalt. The vegetation is tropical; the lotus thorn, palms, indigo, etc. The water is sweet, sparkling and transparent; the fish abundant as of old, many species being those of the Nile, the silurus, mugil, and sparers Galiloeus. Dr. Tristram says: "the shoals of fish Were marvelous, black masses of many hundred yards long, with the black fins projecting out of the water, as thickly as they could pack. There are the European loach, bethel, blenny and cyprinodont; the African chromis, hemichromis, and eellike clarias; and the Asiatic discognathus. The cyprinodonts are viviparous, and the sexual differences marked; they can live in cold water, or hot springs up to 90ø, fresh, brackish, or briny water. This marks a former connection between these waters and those ...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/G/Galilee,+sea+of/

Galilee in Hitchcock's Bible Names

wheel; revolution

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/G/Galilee/

Sea of Galilee Scripture - Matthew 4:18

And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/4/

Sea of Galilee Scripture - Mark 7:31

And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/7/

Sea of Tiberias in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

See GALILEE, SEA OF

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/T/TIBERIAS,+SEA+OF/

Sea of Tiberias in Naves Topical Bible

1. A city next to Lake Galilee Joh 6:23 -2. The sea of, a name given to Lake Galilee Joh 6:1; 21:1 See GALILEE, Number two

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/T/TIBERIAS/

Sea of Tiberias in Smiths Bible Dictionary

Joh 21:1 [GENNESARET, SEA OF]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tiberias,+The+Sea+of/

Sea of Tiberias in Easton's Bible Dictionary

called also the Sea of Galilee (q.v.) and of Gennesaret. In the Old Testament it is called the Sea of Chinnereth or Chinneroth. John (21:1) is the only evangelist who so designates this lake. His doing so incidentally confirms the opinion that he wrote after the other evangelists, and at a period subsequent to the taking of Jerusalem (A.D. 70). Tiberias had by this time become an important city, having been spared by the Romans, and made the capital of the province when Jerusalem was destroyed. It thus naturally gave its name to the lake.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tiberias,+Sea+of/

Sea of Tiberias in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

John's (John 6:1; John 21:1) designation as better understood by the Gentile Romans, etc., whom he addressed. frontGALILEE, SEA or, the local designation.) Lieut. Kitchener makes the depth 682.554 ft. The neighbouring Kurn Hattin is an extinct volcano, and the plain is strewn with basalt and debris. He thinks Khirbet Minyeh the site of Capernaum. Josephus says the fountain Capharnaum waters the plain. This may correspond to the modern Ain et Tabighah, the water of which being brought past Khirbet Minyeh waters the plain, and would naturally take its name Capharnaum from that place (presuming that it was Capernaum). The source is only three quarters of a mile away, whereas it is one mile and three quarters from Tel Hum and all the water was carried in an opposite direction, so that it could hardly have taken its name from Tel Hum. In John 6:16, etc., we read "the disciples went by ship over the sea toward Capernaum (the same side as Tiberias), and the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew"; then Jesus walked on the sea to them, and "immediately the ship was at the land where they went." The day following, when the people on the other side of the sea (the eastern side) saw that there was none other boat there save the one whereinto His disciples were entered, ... howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias, nigh unto the place where they did eat bread ... they also took shipping, and came to Capernaum seeking for Jesus; and when they had found Him on the other side ... they said, ... When camest Thou here?" In Matthew 14:22 "Jesus constrained His disciples to get into a ship and go unto the other side. And He went up into a mountain apart to pray .... But the ship was now in the midst of the sea, tossed with waves, for the wind was contrary." It might seem strange that the people did not suppose Jesus had used one of the return boats which had come from Tiberias, to cross back to that side in the night. Matthew undesignedly shows why they could not suppose so, namely, because "the wind was contrary," i.e. blowing from Tiberias and Capernaum; owing to this the ships, probably fishing vessels, were driven to the opposite side for shelter for the night, for what else could have taken to the desert eastern side so many boats as sufficed to convey the people across (Matthew 14:24) back again? Their question, "Rabbi, when camest Thou here?" implies plainly that under the circumstances they considered that His crossing in the night could only have been by some extraordinary means. The mention of many ships coming from Tiberias explains also how the people could take shipping to Capernaum after it had been stated there was no other boat there save that which took the disciples. The undesigned harmony of details, incidentally and separately noticed by the two evangelists, confirms their truthfulness, and therefore the miracle of Jesus' walking on the sea. The Gospels - according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke - never use the designation "sea of Tiberias" (still bahr Tubariyeh), but the local name," sea" or "lake of Galilee," which shows they must have written before that became the universal designation, as it had in the time of John's writing.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tiberias,+sea+of/

Tiberias in Hitchcock's Bible Names

good vision; the navel

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tiberias/

Sea of Tiberias Scripture - John 21:1

After these things Jesus shewed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and on this wise shewed he [himself].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/21/

Sea of Tiberias Scripture - John 6:1

After these things Jesus went over the sea of Galilee, which is [the sea] of Tiberias.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/6/

Seir in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

se'-ir: (1) (har se'-ir, "Mt. Seir" (Gen 14:6, etc.), 'erets se`-ir (Gen 32:3, etc.); to oros Seeir, ge Seeir): In Gen 32:3 "the land of Seir" is equated with "the field of Edom." The Mount and the Land of Seir are alternative appellations of the mountainous tract which runs along the eastern side of the Arabah, occupied by the descendants of Esau, who succeeded the ancient Horites (Gen 14:6; 36:20), "cave-dwellers," in possession. For a description of the land see EDOM. (2) (har se`ir; Codex Vaticanus Assar; Codex Alexandrinus Seeir): A landmark on the boundary of Judah (Josh 15:10), not far from Kiriath-jearim and Chesalon. The name means "shaggy," and probably here denoted a wooded height. It may be that part of the range which runs Northeast from Saris by Karyat el- `Anab and Biddu to the plateau of el-Jib. Traces of an ancient forest are still to be seen here.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/S/SEIR/

Seir in Naves Topical Bible

1. A range of hills southwest of the Dead Sea De 1:2 Along the route from Horeb to Kadesh-barnea De 1:1,2 The people of Israel travel by De 1:2; 2:1; 33:2 Originally inhabited by Horites Ge 14:6; 36:20-30; De 2:12 Later inhabited by the descendants of Esau after they destroyed the Horim people De 2:12,22; with Ge 32:3; 33:14,16; 36:8,9; Nu 24:18; De 2:4,5 The southern boundary of the conquests of Joshua Jos 11:15-18 -2. A Horite chief Ge 36:20,21; 1Ch 1:38

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/S/SEIR/

Seir in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(hairy, Shaggy), 1. We have both "land of Seir," Ge 32:3; 36:50 and "Mount Seir." Ge 14:6 It is the original name of the mountain range extending along the east side of the valley of Arabah, from the Dead Sea to the Elanitic, Golf. The Horites appear to have been the chief of the aboriginal inhabitants, Ge 36:20 but it was ever afterward the possession of the Edomites, the descendants of Esau. The Mount Seir of the: Bible extended much farther south than the modern province, as is shown by the words of De 2:1-8 It had the Arabah on the west, vs. 1 and 8; it extended as far south as the head of the Gulf of Akabah, ver. 8; its eastern border ran along the base of the mountain range where the plateau of Arabia begins. Its northern, order is not so accurately determined. There is a line of "naked" white hills or cliffs which run across the great valley about eight miles south of the Dead Sea, the highest eminence being Mount Hor, which is 4800 feet high. 2. Mount Seir, an entirely different place from the foregoing; one of the landmarks on the north boundary of the territory of Judah. Jos 15:10 only. It lay westward of Kirjath-jearim, and between it and Beth-shemesh. If Kuriel el-Enab be the former and Ain-shems the latter of these two, then Mount Seir cannot fail to be the ridge which lies between the Wady Aly and the Wady Ghurab. In a pass of this ridge is the modern village of Seir.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/S/Seir/

Ramoth Gilead in Easton's Bible Dictionary

heights of Gilead, a city of refuge on the east of Jordan; called "Ramoth in Gilead" (Deut. 4:43; Josh. 20:8; 21:38). Here Ahab, who joined Jehoshaphat in an endeavour to rescue it from the hands of the king of Syria, was mortally wounded (1 Kings 22:1-36). A similar attempt was afterwards made by Ahaziah and Joram, when the latter was wounded (2 Kings 8:28). In this city Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, was anointed by one of the sons of the prophets (9:1, 4). It has with probability been identified with Reimun, on the northern slope of the Jabbok, about 5 miles west of Jerash or Gerasa, one of the cities of Decapolis. Others identify it with Gerosh, about 25 miles north-east of es-Salt, with which also many have identified it. (See RAMATH-MIZPEH -T0003066.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Ramoth-gilead/

Ramoth Gilead in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("Heights of Gilead.") A fortress commanding Argob and the Jair towns, occupied by Solomon's commissariat officer (1 Kings 4:13). Keenly fought for by the Israelites and their enemies the Syrians under Ahab and Joram (1 Kings 22:4; it had been seized by Benhadad I from Omri; Josephus Ant. 8:15, section 3. Ahab fell in attempting to recover it). Joram of Israel allied himself with Ahaziah of Judah (2 Chronicles 22:5-6), gained and kept Ramoth Gilead in spite of Hazael (2 Kings 9:14-15; Josephus Ant. 9:6; section 1). Jehu from it started to seize the kingdom. 2 Kings 8:28 or Ramath Mizpeh in Joshua 13:26. The spot called by Jacob in his covenant with Laban, of which the pillar and stone heap was pledge, Galeed and Mizpah. (See MIZPAH.) A city of refuge in Gad (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:38). Now Es Salt, W. of Philadelphia, or else Jela'ad (Gilead) four miles N. of Es Salt, for Ramath Mizpeh is in the N. of Gad (Joshua 13:26), which Es Salt is not. The Arabic of Joshua 13:26 has Ramah el Jeresh or Ramah el Jerash (Gerasa).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Ramoth+gilead/

Ramoth in Hitchcock's Bible Names

eminences; high places

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Ramoth/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:4

And he said unto Jehoshaphat, Wilt thou go with me to battle to Ramothgilead? And Jehoshaphat said to the king of Israel, I [am] as thou [art], my people as thy people, my horses as thy horses.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:3

And Ahab king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat king of Judah, Wilt thou go with me to Ramothgilead? And he answered him, I [am] as thou [art], and my people as thy people; and [we will be] with thee in the war.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Kings 9:4

So the young man, [even] the young man the prophet, went to Ramothgilead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/9/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:15

So he came to the king. And the king said unto him, Micaiah, shall we go against Ramothgilead to battle, or shall we forbear? And he answered him, Go, and prosper: for the LORD shall deliver [it] into the hand of the king.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 4:13

The son of Geber, in Ramothgilead; to him [pertained] the towns of Jair the son of Manasseh, which [are] in Gilead; to him [also pertained] the region of Argob, which [is] in Bashan, threescore great cities with walls and brasen bars:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/4/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:29

So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramothgilead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:28

So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramothgilead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 22:5

He walked also after their counsel, and went with Jehoram the son of Ahab king of Israel to war against Hazael king of Syria at Ramothgilead: and the Syrians smote Joram.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:6

Then the king of Israel gathered the prophets together, about four hundred men, and said unto them, Shall I go against Ramothgilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And they said, Go up; for the Lord shall deliver [it] into the hand of the king.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:20

And the LORD said, Who shall persuade Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one said on this manner, and another said on that manner.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Kings 9:14

So Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi conspired against Joram. (Now Joram had kept Ramothgilead, he and all Israel, because of Hazael king of Syria.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/9/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:2

And after [certain] years he went down to Ahab to Samaria. And Ahab killed sheep and oxen for him in abundance, and for the people that [he had] with him, and persuaded him to go up [with him] to Ramothgilead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:19

And the LORD said, Who shall entice Ahab king of Israel, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one spake saying after this manner, and another saying after that manner.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Kings 8:28

And he went with Joram the son of Ahab to the war against Hazael king of Syria in Ramothgilead; and the Syrians wounded Joram.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/8/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:14

And when he was come to the king, the king said unto him, Micaiah, shall we go to Ramothgilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And he said, Go ye up, and prosper, and they shall be delivered into your hand.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:5

Therefore the king of Israel gathered together of prophets four hundred men, and said unto them, Shall we go to Ramothgilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And they said, Go up; for God will deliver [it] into the king's hand.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Kings 9:1

And Elisha the prophet called one of the children of the prophets, and said unto him, Gird up thy loins, and take this box of oil in thine hand, and go to Ramothgilead:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/9/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 1 Kings 22:12

And all the prophets prophesied so, saying, Go up to Ramothgilead, and prosper: for the LORD shall deliver [it] into the king's hand.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ramoth Gilead Scripture - 2 Chronicles 18:11

And all the prophets prophesied so, saying, Go up to Ramothgilead, and prosper: for the LORD shall deliver [it] into the hand of the king.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/18/

Red Sea in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(yam-cuph (Ex 10:19 and often), but in many passages it is simply hayam, "the sea"' Septuagint with 2 or 3 exceptions renders it by he eruthra thalassa, "the Red Sea"; Latin geographers Mare Rubrum): 1. Name 2. Peculiarities 3. Old Testament References 4. Passage through the Red Sea by the Israelites Objections (1) Steep Banks of the Channel (2) Walls Formed by the Water (3) The East Winds (4) The Miraculous Set Aside LITERATURE 1. Name: The Hebrew name yam-cuph has given rise to much controversy. Yam is the general word for sea, and when standing alone may refer to the Mediterranean, the Dead Sea, the Red Sea, or the Sea of Galilee. In several places it designates the river Nile or Euphrates. Cuph means a rush or seaweed such as abounds in the lower portions of the Nile and the upper portions of the Red Sea. It was in the cuph on the brink of the river that the ark of Moses was hidden (Ex 2:3,5). But as this word does not in itself mean red, and as that is not the color of the bulrush, authorities are much divided as to the reason for this designation. Some have supposed that it was called red from the appearance of the mountains on the western coast, others from the red color given to the water by the presence of zoophytes, or red coral, or some species of seaweed. Others still, with considerable probability, suppose that the name originated in the red or copper color of the inhabitants of the bordering Arabian peninsula. But the name yam-cuph, though applied to the whole sea, was especially used with reference to the northern part, which is alone mentioned in the Bible, and to the two gulfs (Suez and Aqabah) which border the Sinaitic Peninsula, especially the Gulf of Suez. 2. Pecularities: The Red Sea has a length of 1,350 miles and an extreme breadth of 205 miles. It is remarkable that while it has no rivers flowing into it and the evaporation from its surface is enormous, it is not much salter than the ocean, from which it is inferred that there must be a constant influx of water from the Indian Ocean through the Straits of Bab-el- Mandeb, together with an outflow of the more saline water beneath the surface. The deepest portion measures 1,200 fathoms. Owing to the lower land levels which prevailed in recent geological times, the Gulf of Suez formerly extended...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/RED+SEA/

Red Sea in Naves Topical Bible

The locusts which devastated Egypt destroyed in Ex 10:19 -Israelites cross; Pharaoh and his army drowned in Ex 14; 15:1,4,11,19; Nu 33:8; De 11:4; Jos 2:10; 4:23; 24:6,7; Jud 11:16; 2Sa 22:16; Ne 9:9-11; Ps 66:6; 78:13,53; 106:7-11,22; 136:13-15; Isa 43:16,17; Ac 7:36; 1Co 10:1,2; Heb 11:29 -Israelites camp beside Ex 14:2,9; Nu 14:25; 21:4; 33:10,11; De 1:40; 2:1-3 -The boundary of the promised land Ex 23:31 -Solomon builds ships beside 1Ki 9:26 -The wilderness of Ex 13:18

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/RED+SEA/

Red Sea in Smiths Bible Dictionary

1. Name. --The sea known to us as the Red Sea was by the Israelites called "the sea," Ex 14:2,9,16,21,28; 15:1,4,8,10,19; Jos 24:6,7 and many other passages, and specially "the sea of Suph." Ex 10:19; 13:18; 15:4,22; 23:31; Nu 14:25 etc. This word signifies a sea-weed resembling wool, and such sea-weed is thrown up abundantly on the shores of the Red Sea; hence Brugsch calls it the sea of reeds or weeds. The color of the water is not red. Ebers says that it is of a lovely blue-green color, and named Red either from its red banks or from the Erythraeans, who were called the red people. 2. Physical description. --In extreme length the Red Sea stretches from the straits of Bab el-Mendeb (or rather Ras Bab el-Mendeb), 18 miles wide. in lat. 12 degrees 40' N., to the modern head of the Gulf of Suez, lat. 30 degrees N., a distance of 1450 miles. Its greatest width may be stated at about 210 miles. At Ras Mohammed, on the north, the Red Sea is split by the granitic peninsula of Sinai into two gulfs; the westernmost, or Gulf of Suez, is now about 150 miles in length, with an average width of about 20, though it contracts to less than 10 miles; the easternmost or Gulf of el-'Akabeh, is about 100 miles long, from the Straits of Tiran to the 'Akabeh, and 15 miles wide. The average depth of the Red Sea is from 2500 to 3500 feet, though in places it is 6000 feet deep. Journeying southward from Suez, on our left is the peninsula of Sinai; on the right is the desert coast of Egypt, of limestone formation like the greater part of the Nile valley in Egypt, the cliff's on the sea margin stretching landward in a great rocky plateau while more inland a chain of volcanic mountains, beginning about lat. 28 degrees 4' and running south, rear their lofty peaks at intervals above the limestone, generally about 15 miles distant. 3. Ancient limits. --The most important change in the Red Sea has been the drying up of its northern extremity, "the tongue of the Egyptian Sea." about the head of the gulf has risen and that near the Mediterranean become depressed. The head of the gulf has consequently retired gradually since the Christian era. Thus the prophecy of Isaiah has been fulfilled, Isa 11:15; 10:5 the tongue of the Red Sea has dried up for a distance of at least 50 miles from its ancient head. An ancient canal conveyed the waters of the Nile to the Red Sea, flowing through the Wadi-t Tumeylat and irrigating with its system of water-channels a large extent of country. It was 62 Roman miles long, 54 feet wide and 7 feet deep. The drying up of the head of the gulf appears to have been one of the chief causes of the neglect and ruin of this canal. The country, for the distance above indicated, is now a desert of gravelly sand, with wide patches about the old sea-bottom, of rank marsh land, now called the "Bitter Lakes." At the northern extremity of this salt waste is a small lake, sometimes called the Lake of Heropolis; the lake is now Birket-et-Timsah "the lake of the crocodile," and is supposed to mark the ancient head of the gulf. The canal that connected this with the Nile was of Pharaonic origin. It was anciently known as the "Fossa Regum" and the "canal of Hero." The time at which the canal was extended, after the drying up of the head of the gulf, to the present head is uncertain, but it must have been late, and probably since the Mohammedan conquest. Traces of the ancient channel throughout its entire length to the vicinity of Bubastis exist at intervals in the present day. The land north of the ancient gulf is a plain of heavy sand, merging into marsh-land near the Mediterranean coast, and extending...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Red+Sea/

Red Sea in Easton's Bible Dictionary

The sea so called extends along the west coast of Arabia for about 1,400 miles, and separates Asia from Africa. It is connected with the Indian Ocean, of which it is an arm, by the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb. At a point (Ras Mohammed) about 200 miles from its nothern extremity it is divided into two arms, that on the east called the AElanitic Gulf, now the Bahr el-'Akabah, about 100 miles long by 15 broad, and that on the west the Gulf of Suez, about 150 miles long by about 20 broad. This branch is now connected with the Mediterranean by the Suez Canal. Between these two arms lies the Sinaitic Peninsula. The Hebrew name generally given to this sea is _Yam Suph_. This word _suph_ means a woolly kind of sea-weed, which the sea casts up in great abundance on its shores. In these passages, Ex. 10:19; 13:18; 15:4, 22; 23:31; Num. 14:25, etc., the Hebrew name is always translated "Red Sea," which was the name given to it by the Greeks. The origin of this name (Red Sea) is uncertain. Some think it is derived from the red colour of the mountains on the western shore; others from the red coral found in the sea, or the red appearance sometimes given to the water by certain zoophytes floating in it. In the New Testament (Acts 7:36; Heb. 11:29) this name is given to the Gulf of Suez. This sea was also called by the Hebrews Yam- mitstraim, i.e., "the Egyptian sea" (Isa. 11:15), and simply Ha-yam, "the sea" (Ex. 14:2, 9, 16, 21, 28; Josh. 24:6, 7; Isa. 10:26, etc.). The great historical event connected with the Red Sea is the passage of the children of Israel, and the overthrow of the Egyptians, to which there is frequent reference in Scripture (Ex. 14, 15; Num. 33:8; Deut. 11:4; Josh. 2:10; Judg. 11:16; 2 Sam. 22:16; Neh. 9:9-11; Ps. 66:6; Isa. 10:26; Acts 7:36, etc.).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Red+Sea/

Red Sea in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Hebrew: Sea of Suph ("seaweed"; like wool, as the Arabic means: Gesenius). The Egyptians called it the Sea of Punt (Arabia). Called "red" probably from the color of the weed, and the red coral and sandstone, not from Edom ("red") which touched it only at Elath; nor from Himyerites (hamar, "red" in Arabic; the Phoenicians too are thought to mean red men, and to have come from the Red Sea), as their connection with it was hardly so dose and so early as to have given the name. An ancient canal, begun by Sesostris, continued by Darius Hystaspes and Ptolemy Philadelphus, joined the Nile to it. Boundaries. On the W. Egypt, Nubia, and Abyssinia; on the E. Arabia; on the N. the isthmus of Suez; on the S. the straits of Bab el Mandeb ("gate of tears") joining it to the Indian ocean; 1,600 English miles long, by an average of 150 broad. The mountains on each side vary from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. high; the tops granite, underneath limestone, on the seashore light colored sandstone. The northern end ("the tongue of the Egyptian Sea"), since the Exodus, has dried up for 50 miles. The land at the head of the gulf has risen, that on the Mediterranean has fallen (compare Isaiah 11:15; Isaiah 19:5). This drying up has caused the ancient canal which conveyed the Red Sea commerce to the Nile (from about Hereopolis on the Birket et Timsah and lake of the crocodile to Bubastis at the Nile), and irrigated the country (wady Tumeylat) to be neglected and ruined. The country about has consequently become a gravely sand desert, with rank marsh land round the old sea bottom, called "the bitter lakes." Near them was the town Heroopolis, from which the gulf of Suez was called the Heroopolite gulf. Ras Mohammed, the headland of the Sinaitic peninsula, divides the Red Sea into two tongues: the western one the gulf of Suez, 130 miles long by 18 broad, narrowing to ten at the head; the eastern one the gulf of Akabah ("a declivity"), 90 long by an average of 15 broad. Precipitous mountains 2,000 ft. high rise from the shore. The Arabah or Ghor connects it with the Dead Sea and Jordan valley. Anciently the gulf of Akabah was the Sinus Elaniticus, from Oelana or Elath at the northern end. No considerable stream falls into this large sea. The gulf of Suez is the shallowest part. The waters are remarkably transparent, so that the plants, corals, and rocks are visible to a great depth. Its phosphorescence is also noteworthy. This is the most northern part of the ocean where coral reefs are found. These take the outline of the coast, and being covered for some distance with only five or sir feet of water render access to land difficult. The western or Egyptian side of the Red Sea is of limestone formation; gebel Gharib 6,000 ft. high; the porphyry mountain, gebel ed Dukhkhan, inland, is about...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Red+sea/

Red Sea Scripture - Exodus 10:19

And the LORD turned a mighty strong west wind, which took away the locusts, and cast them into the Red sea; there remained not one locust in all the coasts of Egypt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/10/

Rehoboth in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

re-ho'-both, re-ho'-both (rehobhoth, "broad places"; Euruchoria): One of the wells dug by Isaac (Gen 26:22). It is probably the Rubuta of the Tell el-Amarna Letters (Petrie, numbers 256, 260; see also The Expository Times, XI, 239 (Konig), 377 (Sayce)), and it is almost certainly identical with the ruin Ruchaibeh, 8 hours Southwest of Beersheba. Robinson (BR, I, 196-97) describes the ruins of the ancient city as thickly covering a "level tract of 10 to 12 acres in extent"; "many of the dwellings had each its cistern, cut in the solid rock"; "once this must have been a city of not less than 12,000 or 15,000 inhabitants. Now it is a perfect field of ruins, a scene of unutterable desolation, across which the passing stranger can with difficulty find his way." Huntington (Israel and Its Transformation, 124) describes considerable remains of a suburban population extending both to the North and to the South of this once important place.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/REHOBOTH/

Rehoboth in Naves Topical Bible

1. A city built by Asshur Ge 10:11 -2. A city of the Edomites Ge 36:37; 1Ch 1:48 -3. The name given to a well that was dug by Isaac and his servants Ge 26:22

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/REHOBOTH/

Rehoboth in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(wide places, i.e. streets). 1. The third of the series of wells dug by Isaac, Ge 26:22 in the Philistines' territory, lately identified as er- Ruheibeh, 16 miles south of Beersheba. 2. One of the four cities built by Asshur, or by Nimrod in Asshur, according as this difficult passage is translated. Ge 10:11 Nothing certain is known of its position. 3. The city of a certain Saul or Shaul, one of the early kings of the Edomites. Ge 36:37; 1Ch 1:48 The affix "by the river" fixes the situation of Rehoboth as on the Euphrates.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Rehoboth/

Rehoboth in Easton's Bible Dictionary

broad places. (1.) A well in Gerar dug by Isaac (Gen. 26:22), supposed to be in Wady er-Ruheibeh, about 20 miles south of Beersheba. (2.) An ancient city on the Euphrates (Gen. 36:37; 1 Chr. 1:48), "Rehoboth by the river." (3.) Named among the cities of Asshur (Gen. 10:11). Probably, however, the words "rehoboth'ir" are to be translated as in the Vulgate and the margin of A.V., "the streets of the city," or rather "the public square of the city", i.e., of Nineveh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rehoboth/

Rehoboth in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("room, broad space".) Third of Isaac's wells, called so because after that the wells Esek ("contention") and Sitnah ("hatred"), which his men had dug, the Gerar herdsmen would not let him keep peaceably, now at last his good has overcome their evil, and God makes room for him. Spiritually Romans 12:18-21; Genesis 32:20; Genesis 13:7-9; Matthew 5:25; Revelation 15:2; John 14:2. In the wady er Ruhaibeh are ruins of a large city, eight hours S. of Beersheba, and an ancient well, 12 ft. in circumference, built with hewn stone, now filled up (Robinson Phys. Geog., 243; "Our Work in Israel," 299). Its site is marked by fallen masonry, seemingly a cupola roof of well cemented brick shaped stones. At hand is Shutnet, the "Sitnah" of Scripture: Rehoboth lies 20 miles S.W. of Bir es Seba or Beersheba, with three remaining wells, two full of water, one dry.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rehoboth+(1)/

Rehoboth in Hitchcock's Bible Names

spaces; places

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Rehoboth/

Rehoboth Scripture - Genesis 26:22

And he removed from thence, and digged another well; and for that they strove not: and he called the name of it Rehoboth; and he said, For now the LORD hath made room for us, and we shall be fruitful in the land.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/26/

Rehoboth Scripture - Genesis 10:11

Out of that land went forth Asshur, and builded Nineveh, and the city Rehoboth, and Calah,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Rehoboth Scripture - Genesis 36:37

And Samlah died, and Saul of Rehoboth [by] the river reigned in his stead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/36/

Rehoboth Scripture - 1 Chronicles 1:48

And when Samlah was dead, Shaul of Rehoboth by the river reigned in his stead.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/1/

Rephidim in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ref'-i-dim (rephidhim, "rests"; Rhaphidin): A station in the Wanderings, between the wilderness of Sin and the wilderness of Sinai (Ex 17:1,8; 19:2; Nu 33:14). The host expected to find water here; to their distress the streams were dry, and water was miraculously provided. Palmer (Desert of the Exodus, 158 ff) states cogent reasons for identifying Rephidim with Wady Feiran. It is the most fertile part of the peninsula, well watered, with a palm grove stretching for miles along the valley. Palmer speaks of passing through the palm grove as a "most delightful" walk; "the tall, graceful trees afforded a delicious shade, fresh water ran at our feet, and, above all, bulbuls flitted from branch to branch uttering their sweet notes." His camp was pitched at "the mouth of Wady `Aleyat, a large open space completely surrounded by steep, shelving mountains of gneiss, the fantastic cleavage of which added greatly to the beauty of the scene. Palms and tamarisks were dotted all around, and on every knoll and mountain slope were ruined houses, churches, and walls, the relics of the ancient monastic city of Paran. Behind our tents rose the majestic mass of Serbal, and beneath the rocky wall opposite ran a purling brook, only a few inches in depth, but still sufficiently cool, clear, and refreshing." Such a place as this the Amalekites would naturally wish to preserve for themselves against an invading people. For these desert dwellers, indeed, the possession of this watered vale may well have been a matter of life and death. If this identification is correct, then Jebel Tachuneh, "Mount of the mill," a height that rises on the North of the valley, may have been the hill from which Moses, with Aaron and Hur, viewed the battle.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/REPHIDIM/

Rephidim in Naves Topical Bible

A camping place of Israel in their wandering of forty years Ex 17:1,8; 19:2; Nu 33:14,15

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/REPHIDIM/

Rephidim in Smiths Bible Dictionary

Ex 17:1,8; 19:2 The name means rests or stays, i.e. resting places. The place lies in the march of the Israelites from Egypt to Sinai. Its site is not certain, but it is perhaps Wady Feiran, a rather broad valley about 25 miles from Jebel Musa (Mount Sinai). Others place it in Wady es Sheikh, an eastern continuation of Feiran, and about 12 miles from Sinai. Here the Israelites fought their first battle and gained their first victory after leaving Egypt, the Amalekites having attacked them; here also the people murmured from thirst, and Moses brought water for them out of the rock. From this murmuring the place was called "Massah" and "Meribah."

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Rephidim/

Rephidim in Easton's Bible Dictionary

supports, one of the stations of the Israelites, situated in the Wady Feiran, near its junction with the Wady esh- Sheikh. Here no water could be found for the people to drink, and in their impatience they were ready to stone Moses, as if he were the cause of their distress. At the command of God Moses smote "the rock in Horeb," and a copious stream flowed forth, enough for all the people. After this the Amalekites attacked the Israelites while they were here encamped, but they were utterly defeated (Ex. 17:1, 8-16). They were the "first of the nations" to make war against Israel (Num. 24:20). Leaving Rephidim, the Israelites advanced into the wilderness of Sinai (Ex. 19:1, 2; Num. 33:14, 15), marching probably through the two passes of the Wady Solaf and the Wady esh-Sheikh, which converge at the entrance to the plain er-Rahah, the "desert of Sinai," which is two miles long and about half a mile broad. (See SINAI -T0003442; MERIBAH

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rephidim/

Rephidim in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("rests" or "stays") (Exodus 17:1; Exodus 17:8; Exodus 19:2). Here Israel first suffered from want of water, and here they defeated Amalek. Captains Wilson and Palmer make the battle in wady Feiran, near the ancient city of Feiran (amidst traces of building and cultivation) under Mount Serbal. But Holland (Canon Cook's essay on Exodus 16; 17; 19; Speaker's Commentary) places Rephidim after Israel traversed the wady es Sheikh at the pass el Watiyeh shut in by perpendicular rocks on either side; a choice position for Amalek as it commands the entrance to the wadies round the central group of Sinai. On the N. is a plain without water, Israel's encampment. N. of the defile is a hill and bore cliff such as Moses struck with his rod. S. of the pass is another plain, Amalek's encampment, within reach of abundant water. At the foot of the hill whereon Moses sat (Exodus 17:12 or else Exodus 18:13) the Arabs call a rock "the seat of the prophet Moses." frontEXODUS.) The fertility of Feiran is Stanley's argument for it as the site of Rephidim, Amalek being likely to contend for it against Israel. The "hill" in Exodus 17:9-10, he identifies with that on which the church of Paran stood (Numbers 33:12-13). Holland's view is probably the truer one, for wady es Sheikh is the only open broad way from the N.W. into the "wilderness of Sinai", Ras Sufsafeh before the open er Rahah or "desert of Sinai" being the true Mount Sinai, not Serbal. The Bir Musa, "well of Moses," in the wide part of wady es Sheykh, is immediately outside or N. of the pass out of Horeb. Wady es Sheykh, "the valley of the chiefs," may allude to the elders appointed at Jethro's suggestion to be rulers and judges under Moses (Exodus 18:21-26). Forster (if his reading be correct: Voice of Israel, p. 118) interprets an inscription with a man's figure with uplifted hands on a rock, "the prophet upon a hard great stone prayeth unto God, Aaron and Hur sustaining his hands." It was after receiving the water supply at Rephidim from God that Israel conquered Amalek. So it is only after the Christian receives the living water front Christ the smitten Rock that he can effectively conquer his spiritual foes (1 John 5:4). Faith and prayer go together, as at Rephidim. Lift up, not an empty hand, but like Moses grasping the rod hold fast God's word of promise, filling the hand with this effectual plea (Exodus 17:9; Exodus 17:11-12; Job 23:4; Psalm 119:49; Isaiah 43:26; James 5:16). (See MASSAH; MERIBAH.) Moses struck the rock in Horeb at some point not in the people's sight, therefore not near the summit, but in the presence of selected witnesses, the elders (Exodus 17:5-6). The "spiritual rock, Christ, followed all the Israelites" (1 Corinthians 10:4). The repetition of the miracle (Numbers 20:11) at Kadesh shows that the rabbinical tradition is incorrect, that the rock or the stream followed them literally in all their journeys. Rather He of whom the rock was type accompanied them and supplied all their needs (1 Corinthians 10:4).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rephidim/

Rephidim in Hitchcock's Bible Names

beds; places of rest

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Rephidim/

Rephidim Scripture - Exodus 17:1

And all the congregation of the children of Israel journeyed from the wilderness of Sin, after their journeys, according to the commandment of the LORD, and pitched in Rephidim: and [there was] no water for the people to drink.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/17/

Rephidim Scripture - Exodus 19:2

For they were departed from Rephidim, and were come [to] the desert of Sinai, and had pitched in the wilderness; and there Israel camped before the mount.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/19/

Rephidim Scripture - Numbers 33:14

And they removed from Alush, and encamped at Rephidim, where was no water for the people to drink.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Rephidim Scripture - Numbers 33:15

And they departed from Rephidim, and pitched in the wilderness of Sinai.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Rephidim Scripture - Exodus 17:8

Then came Amalek, and fought with Israel in Rephidim.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/17/

Rome in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

rom: I. DEVELOPMENT OF THE REPUBLICAN CONSTITUTION 1. Original Roman State 2. The Struggle between Patricians and Plebeians 3. The Senate and Magistrates 4. Underlying Principles II. EXTENSION OF ROMAN SOVEREIGNTY III. THE IMPERIAL GOVERNMENT 1. Imperial Authority 2. Three Classes of Citizens IV. ROMAN RELIGION 1. Deities 2. Religious Decay V. ROME AND THE JEWS 1. Judea under Roman Procurators and Governors 2. Jewish Proselytism VI. ROME AND THE CHRISTIANS 1. Introduction of Christianity 2. Tolerance and Proscription 3. Persecution LITERATURE Rome (Latin and Italian, Roma; Rhome): The capital of the Roman republic and empire, later the center of Lot Christendom, and since 1871 capital of the kingdom of Italy, is situated mainly on the left bank of the Tiber about 15 miles from the Mediterranean Sea in 41 degrees 53' 54 inches North latitude and 12 degrees 0' 12 inches longitude East of Greenwich. It would be impossible in the limited space assigned to this article to give even a comprehensive outline of the ancient history of the Eternal City. It will suit the general purpose of the work to consider the relations of the Roman government and society with the Jews and Christians, and, in addition, to present a rapid survey of the earlier development of Roman institutions and power, so as to provide the necessary historical setting for the appreciation of the more essential subjects. I. Development of the Republican Constitution. 1. Original Roman State: The traditional chronology for the earliest period of Roman history is altogether unreliable, partly because the Gauls, in ravaging the city in 390 BC, destroyed the monuments which might have offered faithful testimony of the earlier period (Livy vi.1). It is known that there was a settlement on the site of Rome before the traditional date of the founding (753 BC). The original Roman state was the product of the coalition of a number of adjacent clan-communities, whose names were perpetuated in the Roman genres, or groups of imaginary kindred, a historical survival which had lost all significance in the period of authentic history. The chieftains of the associated clans composed the primitive senate or council of elders, which exercised sovereign authority. But as is customary in the development of human society a military or monarchical regime succeeded the looser patriarchal or sacerdotal organs of authority. This second stage may be identified with the legendary rule of the Tarquins, which was probably a period of Etruscan domination. The confederacy of clans was welded...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/ROME/

Rome in Naves Topical Bible

(The capital of the Roman Empire) -Jews excluded from, by Claudius Caesar Ac 18:2 -Paul's visit to See PAUL -Visited by Onesiphorus 2Ti 1:16,17 -Paul desires to preach in Ro 1:15 -Abominations in Ro 1:18-32 -Christians in Ro 16:5-17; Php 1:12-18; 4:22; 2Ti 4:21 -Paul's letter to the Christians in Ro 1:7 -Paul testifies the gospel of Christ to them Ro 1:16 -The condemnation of the Gentiles Ro 1:18 -The condemnation of the Jews Ro 2 -God's judgment against all sin Ro 2:6; 3 -Justification by faith in Jesus Christ Ro 3:24; 4; 5 -The faith of Abraham Ro 4 -The fruits of faith Ro 5:7 -The works of the flesh and the Spirit Ro 8 -God's supreme power over everyone Ro 9; 11 -The righteousness the law and of faith Ro 10 -Exhorted humility, love, and good works Ro 12 -To obey magistrates Ro 13 -For mutual forbearance Ro 14:15 -Requested to greet various brethren Ro 16

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/ROME/

Rome in Smiths Bible Dictionary

the famous capital of the ancient world, is situated on the Tiber at a distance of about 15 miles from its mouth. The "seven hills," Re 17:9 which formed the nucleus of the ancient city stand on the left bank. On the opposite side of the river rises the far higher side of the Janiculum. Here from very early times was a fortress with a suburb beneath it extending to the river. Modern Rome lies to the north of the ancient city, covering with its principal portion the plain to the north of the seven hills, once known as the Campus Martius, and on the opposite bank extending over the low ground beneath the Vatican to the north of the ancient Janiculum. Rome is not mentioned in the Bible except in the books of Maccabees and in three books of the New Testament, viz., the Acts, the Epistle to the Romans and the Second Epistle to Timothy. 1. Jewish inhabitants. the conquests of Pompey seem to have given rise to the first settlement of Jews at Rome. The Jewish king Aristobulus and his son formed part of Pompey's triumph, and many Jewish captives and immigrants were brought to Rome at that time. A special district was assigned to them, not on the site of the modern Ghetto, between the Capitol and the island of the Tiber, but across the Tiber. Many of these Jews were made freedmen. Julius Caesar showed them some kindness; they were favored also by Augustus, and by Tiberius during the latter part of his reign. It is chiefly in connection with St. Paul's history that Rome comes before us in the Bible. In illustration of that history it may be useful to give some account of Rome in the time of Nero, the "Caesar" to whom St. Paul appealed, and in whose reign he suffered martyrdom. 2. The city in Paul's time. --The city at that time must be imagined as a large and irregular mass of buildings unprotected by an outer wall. It had long outgrown the old Servian wall; but the limits of the suburbs cannot be exactly defined. Neither the nature of the buildings nor the configuration of the ground was such as to give a striking appearance to the city viewed from without. "Ancient Rome had neither cupola nor camyanile," and the hills, never lofty or imposing, would present, when covered with the buildings and streets of a huge city, a confused appearance like the hills of modern London, to which they have sometimes been compared. The visit of St. Paul lies between two famous epochs in the history of the city, viz, its restoration by Augustus and its restoration by Nero. The boast of Augustus is well known, "that he found the city of brick, and left it of marble." Some parts of the city, especially the Forum and Campus Martius, must have presented a magnificent appearance, of which Niebur's "Lectures on Roman History," ii. 177, will give a general idea; but many of the principal buildings which attract the attention of modern travellers in ancient Rome were not yet built. The streets were generally narrow and winding, flanked by densely crowded lodging-houses (insulae) of enormous height. Augustus found it necessary to limit their height to 70 feet. St, Paul's first visit to Rome took place before the Neronian conflagration but even after the restoration of the city which followed upon that event, many of the old evils continued. The population of the city has been variously estimated. Probably Gibbon's estimate of 1,200,000 is nearest to the truth. One half of the population consisted, in all probability, of slaves. The larger part of the remainder consisted of pauper citizens supported in idleness by the miserable system of public gratuities. There appears to have been no middle class, and no free industrial population. Side by side with the wretched classes just mentioned...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Rome/

Rome in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the most celebrated city in the world at the time of Christ. It is said to have been founded B.C. 753. When the New Testament was written, Rome was enriched and adorned with the spoils of the world, and contained a population estimated at 1,200,000, of which the half were slaves, and including representatives of nearly every nation then known. It was distinguished for its wealth and luxury and profligacy. The empire of which it was the capital had then reached its greatest prosperity. On the day of Pentecost there were in Jerusalem "strangers from Rome," who doubtless carried with them back to Rome tidings of that great day, and were instrumental in founding the church there. Paul was brought to this city a prisoner, where he remained for two years (Acts 28:30, 31) "in his own hired house." While here, Paul wrote his epistles to the Philippians, to the Ephesians, to the Colossians, to Philemon, and probably also to the Hebrews. He had during these years for companions Luke and Aristarchus (Acts 27:2), Timothy (Phil. 1:1; Col. 1:1), Tychicus (Eph. 6: 21), Epaphroditus (Phil. 4:18), and John Mark (Col. 4:10). (See PAUL -T0002871.) Beneath this city are extensive galleries, called "catacombs," which were used from about the time of the apostles (one of the inscriptions found in them bears the date A.D. 71) for some three hundred years as places of refuge in the time of persecution, and also of worship and burial. About four thousand inscriptions have been found in the catacombs. These give an interesting insight into the history of the church at Rome down to the time of Constantine.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rome/

Rome in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Paul's first visit was between the restoration by Augustus, whose boast was "he had found the city of brick and left it of marble" (Suet., Aug. 28), and that by Nero after its conflagration. His residence was near the "barrack" (praetorium) attached to the imperial palace on the Palatine (Philemon 1:13). (See PALACE.) Modern Rome lies N. of ancient Rome, covering the Campus Martius, or "plain" to the N. of the seven hills; the latter (Revelation 17:9), the nucleus of the old city, stand on the left bank. On the opposite side of the Tiber is the higher ridge, Janiculum, also the Vatican. The Mamertine prison where legend makes Peter and Paul to have been fellow prisoners for nine months is still under the church of Giuseppe dei Falegnani; but see 2 Timothy 4:11. (See PETER.) The chapel on the Ostian road marks the legendary site of the two parting for martyrdom. The church of Paolo alle Tre Fontane on the Ostian road is the alleged site of Paul's martyrdom. The church of Pietro in Montorio on the Janiculum is that of Peter's martyrdom. The chapel "Domine quo Vadis?" on the Appian road marks where Peter in the legend met the Lord, as he was fleeing from martyrdom. (See PETER.) The bodies of the two apostles first lay in the catacombs ("cemeteries" or sleeping places: Eusebius, H. E. ii. 25); then Paul's body was buried by the Ostian road, Peter's beneath the dome of the famous basilica called after him (Caius, in Eusebius, H. E. ii. 25). All this is mere tradition. Real sites are the Colosseum and Nero's gardens in the Vatican near to Peter's; in them Christians wrapped in beasts' skins were torn by dogs, or clothed in inflammable stuffs were burnt as torches during the midnight games! Others were crucified (Tacitus, Annals xv. 44). The catacombs, "subterranean galleries" (whether sand pits or excavations originally is uncertain), from eight to ten feet, high, and four to six wide extending for miles, near the Appian and Nomentane ways, were used by the early Christians as places of refuge, worship, and burial. The oldest inscription is A.D. 71; thence to A.D. 300 less than thirty Christian inscriptions are known bearing dates, 4,000 undated are considered anterior to Constantine.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rome/

Rome in Hitchcock's Bible Names

strength; power

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Rome/

Rome Scripture - Acts 23:11

And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/23/

Rome Scripture - 2 Timothy 4:22

The Lord Jesus Christ [be] with thy spirit. Grace [be] with you. Amen. <[The second [epistle] unto Timotheus, ordained the first bishop of the church of the Ephesians, was written from Rome, when Paul was brought before Nero the second time.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Timothy/4/

Rome Scripture - Acts 18:2

And found a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla; (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome:) and came unto them

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/18/

Rome Scripture - Colossians 4:18

The salutation by the hand of me Paul. Remember my bonds. Grace [be] with you. Amen. <[Written from Rome to Colossians by Tychicus and Onesimus.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Colossians/4/

Rome Scripture - Ephesians 6:24

Grace [be] with all them that love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity. Amen. <[To [the] Ephesians written from Rome, by Tychicus.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ephesians/6/

Rome Scripture - Philemon 1:25

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with your spirit. Amen. <[Written from Rome to Philemon, by Onesimus a servant.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Philemon/1/

Rome Scripture - Acts 2:10

Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/2/

Rome Scripture - Acts 19:21

After these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/19/

Rome Scripture - Acts 28:16

And when we came to Rome, the centurion delivered the prisoners to the captain of the guard: but Paul was suffered to dwell by himself with a soldier that kept him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/28/

Rome Scripture - Romans 1:7

To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called [to be] saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Romans/1/

Rome Scripture - Galatians 6:18

Brethren, the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with your spirit. Amen. <[To [the] Galatians written from Rome.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Galatians/6/

Rome Scripture - Philippians 4:23

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with you all. Amen. <[To [the] Philippians written from Rome, by Epaphroditus.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Philippians/4/

Pisidia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

pitch; pitchy

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pisidia/

Pisidia Scripture - Acts 13:14

But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Pisidia Scripture - Acts 14:24

And after they had passed throughout Pisidia, they came to Pamphylia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/14/

Pithom in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pi'-thom (pithom; Peitho (Ex 1:11)): 1. Meaning of Name: Champollion (Gesenius, Lexicon, under the word) considered this name to mean "a narrow place" in Coptic, but it is generally explained to be the Egyptian Pa-tum, or "city of the setting sun." It was one of the cities built by the Hebrews (see RAAMSES), and according to Wessel was the Thoum of the Antonine Itinerary. Brugsch (History of Egypt, 1879, II, 343) says that it was identical with "Heracleopolis Parva, the capital of the Sethroitic nome in the age of the Greeks and Romans .... half-way on the great road from Pelusium to Tanis (Zoan), and this indication given on the authority of the itineraries furnishes the sole means of fixing its position." This is, however, disputed. Tum was worshipped at Thebes, at Zoan, and probably at Bubastis, while Heliopolis (Brugsch, Geogr., I, 254) was also called Pa-tum. There were apparently several places of the name; and Herodotus (ii.158) says that the Canal of Darius began a little above Bubastis, "near the Arabian city Patournos," and reached the Red Sea. 2. Situation: (1) Dr. Naville's Theory. In 1885 Dr. E. Naville discovered a Roman milestone of Maximian and Severus, proving that the site of Heroopolis was at Tell el MachuTah ("the walled mound") in Wady Tumeilat. The modern name he gives as Tell el Maskhutah, which was not that heard by the present writer in 1882. This identification had long been supposed probable. Excavations at the site laid bare strong walls and texts showing the worship of Tum. None was found to be older than the time of Rameses II--who, however, is well known to have defaced older inscriptions, and to have substituted his own name for that of earlier builders. A statue of later date, bearing the title "Recorder of Pithom," was also found at this same site. Dr. Naville concluded that this city must be the Old Testament Pithom, and the region round it Succoth--the Egyptian T-k-u (but see SUCCOTH). Brugsch, on the other hand, says that the old name of Heropolis was Qes (see GOSHEN), which recalls the identification of the Septuagint (Gen 46:28); and elsewhere (following Lepsius) he regards the same site as being "the Pa-Khetam of Rameses II" (see ETHAM), which Lepsius believed to be the Old Testament Rameses (see RAAMSES) mentioned with Pithom (Brugsch, Geogr., I, 302, 262). Silvia in 385 AD was shown...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PITHOM/

Pithom in Naves Topical Bible

A treasure city in lower Egypt Ex 1:11

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PITHOM/

Pithom in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(the city of justice), one of the store-cites Israelites for the first oppressor, the Pharaoh "which knew not Joseph." Ex 1:11 It is probably the Patumus of Herodotus (ii. 1 159), a town on the borders of Egypt, nest which Necho constructed a canal from the Nile to the Arabian Gulf.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pithom/

Pithom in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Egyptian, Pa-Tum, "house of Tum," the sun-god, one of the "treasure" cities built for Pharaoh Rameses II. by the Israelites (Ex. 1:11). It was probably the Patumos of the Greek historian Herodotus. It has now been satisfactorily identified with Tell-el-Maskhuta, about 12 miles west of Ismailia, and 20 east of Tel-el-Kebir, on the southern bank of the present Suez Canal. Here have recently (1883) been discovered the ruins of supposed grain-chambers, and other evidences to show that this was a great "store city." Its immense ruin-heaps show that it was built of bricks, and partly also of bricks without straw. Succoth (Ex. 12:37) is supposed by some to be the secular name of this city, Pithom being its sacred name. This was the first halting-place of the Israelites in their exodus. It has been argued (Dr. Lansing) that these "store" cities "were residence cities, royal dwellings, such as the Pharaohs of old, the Kings of Israel, and our modern Khedives have ever loved to build, thus giving employment to the superabundant muscle of their enslaved peoples, and making a name for themselves."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pithom/

Pithom in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

An Egyptian store city built by Israelites for their oppressor (Exodus 1:11). Identified by Brugsch with the fort of Djar, Pachtum. It existed early in the 18th dynasty, before Thothmes III (the Pharaoh who perished in the Red Sea), and was probably erected by his grandfather Aahmes I. The fort subsequently was called Heroopolis. The Egyptian name is Pe Tum, "the house (temple) of Tum," the sun god of Heliopolis. Chabas translated an Egyptian record, mentioning a "reservoir (berekoovota, a slightly modified Hebrew word; confirming the Scripture that ascribes the building to Hebrew) at Pithom on the frontier of the desert." Pithom was on the canal dug or enlarged long before under Osirtasin of the 12th dynasty. Rameses II subsequently fortified and enlarged it and Raamses. Lepsius says the son of Aahmes I was RHMSS. The Rameses, two centuries subsequently, have a final "-u", Ramessu. Brugsch thinks the Israelites started from Raamses, which he thinks to be Zoan or Tauis, and journeying toward the N.E. reached the W. of lake Sirbonit, separated from the Mediterranean by a narrow neck of land. From Mount Kasios here they turned S. through the Bitter Lakes to the N. of the gulf of Suez; then to the Sinai peninsula. In the inscriptions Heracleopolis Parva near Migdol is named Piton "in the district of Succoth" (a Hebrew word meaning "tents"). The place is also called Pt-Ramses "the city of Ramses." (Jewish Intelligencer, Jan. 1877.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pithom/

Pithom in Hitchcock's Bible Names

their mouthful; a dilatation of the mouth

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pithom/

Pithom Scripture - Exodus 1:11

Therefore they did set over them taskmasters to afflict them with their burdens. And they built for Pharaoh treasure cities, Pithom and Raamses.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/1/

Pontus in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pon'-tus (Pontos): Was an important province in the northeastern part of Asia Minor, lying along the south shore of the Black Sea. The name was geographical, not ethnical, in origin, and was first used to designate that part of Cappadocia which bordered on the "Pontus," as the Euxine was often termed. Pontus proper extended from the Halys River on the West to the borders of Colchis on the East, its interior boundaries meeting those of Galatia, Cappadocia and Armenia. The chief rivers besides the Halys were the Iris, Lycus and Thermodon. The configuration of the country included a beautiful but narrow, riparian margin, backed by a noble range of mountains parallel to the coast, while these in turn were broken by the streams that forced their way from the interior plains down to the sea; the valleys, narrower or wider, were fertile and productive, as were the wide plains of the interior such as the Chiliokomon and Phanaroea. The mountain slopes were originally clothed with heavy forests of beech, pine and oak of different species, and when the country was well afforested, the rainfall must have been better adequate than now to the needs of a luxuriant vegetation. The first points in the earliest history of Pontus emerge from obscurity, much as the mountain peaks of its own noble ranges lift their heads above a fog bank. Thus, we catch glimpses of Assyrian culture at Sinope and Amisus, probably as far back as the 3rd millennium BC. The period of Hittite domination in Asia Minor followed hard after, and there is increasing reason to suppose that the Hittites occupied certain leading city sites in Pontus, constructed the artificial mounds or tumuli that frequently meet the eyes of modern travelers, hewed out the rock tombs, and stamped their character upon the early conditions. The home of the Amazons, those warrior priestesses of the Hittites, was located on the banks of the Thermodon, and the mountains rising behind Terme are still called the "Amazon Range"; and the old legends live still in stories about the superior prowess of the modern women living there. See ASIA MINOR, ARCHAEOLOGY OF. As the Hittite power shrunk in extent and force, by the year 1000 BC bands of hardy Greek adventurers appeared from the West sailing along the Euxine main in quest of lands to exploit and conquer and colonize. Cape Jason, which divides the modern mission fields of Trebizond and Marsovan, preserves the memory of the Argonants and the Golden Fleece. Miletus, "greatest of the Ionic towns," sent out its colonists, swarm after swarm, up through the Bosphorus, and along the southern shore of the Black Sea. They occupied Sinope, the northern-most point of the peninsula...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PONTUS/

Pontus in Naves Topical Bible

A province of Asia Minor Ac 2:9; 1Pe 1:1 -Aquila lived in Ac 18:2

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PONTUS/

Pontus in Smiths Bible Dictionary

a large district in the north of Asia Minor, extending along the coast of the Pontus Euxinus Sea (Pontus), from which circumstance the name was derived. It corresponds nearly to the modern Trebizond. It is three times mentioned in the New Testament -- Ac 2:9; 18:2; 1Pe 1:1 All these passages agree in showing that there were many Jewish residents in the district. As to the annals of Pontus, the one brilliant passage of its history is the life of the great Mithridates. Under Nero the whole region was made of Roman province, bearing the name of Pontus. It was conquered by the Turks in A.D. 1461, and is still under their dominion.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pontus/

Pontus in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a province of Asia Minor, stretching along the southern coast of the Euxine Sea, corresponding nearly to the modern province of Trebizond. In the time of the apostles it was a Roman province. Strangers from this province were at Jerusalem at Pentecost (Acts 2:9), and to "strangers scattered throughout Pontus," among others, Peter addresses his first epistle (1 Pet. 1:1). It was evidently the resort of many Jews of the Dispersion. Aquila was a native of Pontus (Acts 18:2).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pontus/

Pontus in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

N. of Asia Minor, stretching along the Euxine sea (Pontus, from whence its name). Acts 2:9-10; Acts 18:2; 1 Peter 1:1; which passages show many Jews resided there. Pompey defeated its great king Mithridates, and so gained the W. of Pontus for Rome, while the E. continued under native chieftains. Under Nero all Pontus became a Roman province. Berenice, great granddaughter of Herod the Great, married Poleme II, the last petty monarch. Paul saw her afterward with her brother Agrippa II at Caesarea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pontus/

Pontus in Hitchcock's Bible Names

the sea

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pontus/

Pontus Scripture - Acts 18:2

And found a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla; (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome:) and came unto them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/18/

Pontus Scripture - 1 Peter 1:1

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Peter/1/

Pontus Scripture - Acts 2:9

Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judaea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/2/

Rabbah in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

rab'-a: (1) (rabbah; Rhabba, Rhabbath, Rhabban. The full name is rabbath bene `ammon; he akra ton huion Ammon, Rhabbath huion Ammon, "Rabbah of the children of Ammon"): This alone of the cities of the Ammonites is mentioned in Scripture, so we may take it as the most important. It is first named in connection with the "bed" or sarcophagus of Og, king of Bashan, which was said to be found here (Dt 3:11). It lay East of the territory assigned to Gad (Josh 13:25). Whatever may have been its history in the interval, it does not appear again in Scripture till the time of David. This monarch sent an embassy of sympathy to King Hanun when his father Nahash died. The kindness was met by wanton insult, which led to the outbreak of war. The Ammonites, strengthened by Aramean allies, were defeated by the Israelites under Joab, and took refuge in Rabbah. After David's defeat of the Arameans at Helam a year later, the Ammonites were exposed alone to the full-force of Israel, the ark of the covenant being carried with the troops. The country was ravaged and siege was laid to Rabbah. It was during this siege that Uriah the Hittite by David's orders was exposed "in the forefront of the hottest battle" (2 Sam 11:15), where, treacherously deserted by his comrades, he was slain. How long the siege lasted we do not know; probably some years; but the end was in sight when Joab captured "the city of waters" (2 Sam 12:27). This may mean that he had secured control of the water supply. In the preceding verse he calls it the "royal city." By the chivalry of his general, David was enabled in person to enjoy the honor of taking the city. Among the booty secured was the crown of Melcom, the god of the Ammonites. Such of the inhabitants as survived he treated with great severity (2 Sam 12:26-31; 1 Ch 20:1 ff). In the utterances of the prophets against Ammon, Rabbah stands for the people, as their most important, or perhaps their only important, city (Jer 49:2,3; Ezek 21:20; 25:5; Am 1:14). Jer 49:4 speaks of the "flowing valley"--a reference perhaps to the abundance of water and fruitfulness--and the treasures in which she gloried. Ezek 21:21 represents the king of Babylon at "the head of the two ways" deciding by means of the divining arrows whether he should march against Jerusalem or against Rabbah. Amos seems to have been impressed with the palaces of Rabbah. The city retained its importance in later times. It was captured by Ptolemy Philadelphus (285-247 BC), who called it Philadelphia. It was a member of the league of ten cities. Antiochus the Great captured it by means of treachery (Polyb. v.71). Josephus (BJ, III, iii, 3) names it as lying East of Peraea. In the 4th century AD, it ranked with Bostra and Gerasa as one of the great fortified cities of Coele- Syria (Ritter, Erdkunde, XV, ii, 1154 f). It became the seat of a bishop. Abulfeda (1321 AD) says that Rabbah was in ruins at the time of the Moslem conquest. Rabbah is represented by the modern `Amman, a ruined site...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/RABBAH/

Rabbah in Naves Topical Bible

1. Also called RABBATH A city east of the Jordan River, originally belonging to the Ammonites Jos 13:25 Bedstead of the giant named Og, kept at De 3:11 Captured by David 2Sa 11:1; 12:26-31; 1Ch 20:1-3 Possessed again by the Ammonites; prophesied against Jer 49:2,3; Eze 21:20; 25:5; Am 1:14 -2. A city in the territory of the tribe of Judah Jos 15:60

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/RABBAH/

Rabbah in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(great). 1. A very strong place on the east of the Jordan, and the chief city of the Ammonites. In five passages -- De 3:11; 2Sa 12:26; 17:27; Jer 49:2; Eze 21:20 --it is styled at length Rabbath of the Ammonites, or the children of Ammon; but elsewhere, Jos 13:25; 2Sa 11:1; 12:27,29; 1Ch 20:1; Jer 49:3 simply Rabbah. When first named it is mentioned as containing the bed or sarcophagus of the giant Og. De 3:11 David sent Joab to besiege Rabbah. 2Sa 11:1,17 etc. Joab succeeded in capturing a portion of the place -- the "city of waters," that is, the lower town so called from its containing the perennial stream which rises in and still flows through it. The citadel still remained to be taken, but this was secured shortly after David's arrival. 2Sa 12:26-31 Long after, at the date of the invasion of Nebuchadnezzar, Jer 49:2,3 it had walls and palaces. It is named in such terms as to imply that it was of equal importance with Jerusalem. Eze 21:20 From Ptolemy Philadelphus (B.C. 285-247) it received the name of Philadelphia. It was one of the cities of the Decapolis, and became the seat of a Christian bishop. Its ruins, which are considerable are found at Ammon about 22 miles from the Jordan. It lies in a valley which is a branch, or perhaps the main course, of the Wady Zerka usually identified with the Jabbok. The public buildings are said to be Roman, except the citadel, which is described as of large square stones put together without cement, and which is probably more ancient than the rest. 2. A city of Judah named with Kirjath-jearim in Jos 15:60 only. No trace of its existence has yet been discovered.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Rabbah/

Rabbah in Easton's Bible Dictionary

or Rab'bath, great. (1.) "Rabbath of the children of Ammon," the chief city of the Ammonites, among the eastern hills, some 20 miles east of the Jordan, on the southern of the two streams which united with the Jabbok. Here the bedstead of Og was preserved (Deut. 3:11), perhaps as a trophy of some victory gained by the Ammonites over the king of Bashan. After David had subdued all their allies in a great war, he sent Joab with a strong force to take their city. For two years it held out against its assailants. It was while his army was engaged in this protracted siege that David was guilty of that deed of shame which left a blot on his character and cast a gloom over the rest of his life. At length, having taken the "royal city" (or the "city of waters," 2 Sam. 12:27, i.e., the lower city on the river, as distinguished from the citadel), Joab sent for David to direct the final assault (11:1; 12:26-31). The city was given up to plunder, and the people were ruthlessly put to death, and "thus did he with all the cities of the children of Ammon." The destruction of Rabbath was the last of David's conquests. His kingdom now reached its farthest limits (2 Sam. 8:1-15; 1 Chr. 18:1-15). The capture of this city is referred to by Amos (1:14), Jeremiah (49:2, 3), and Ezekiel (21:20; 25:5). (2.) A city in the hill country of Judah (Josh. 15:60), possibly the ruin Rubba, six miles north-east of Beit-Jibrin.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rabbah/

Rabbah in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("greatness of size or numbers".) 1. Ammon's chief city, its only city named in Scripture, in contrast to the more civilized Moab's numerous cities (Deuteronomy 3:11; 2 Samuel 12:26; 2 Samuel 17:27; Jeremiah 49:2; Ezekiel 21:20). (See AMMON.) Conjectured to be the Ham of the Zuzim (Genesis 14:5). After Hanun's insult Abishai and Joab defeated the allies Ammon and the Syrians of Bethrehob, Zoba, Ishtob, and Maachah (2 Samuel 10). The following year David in person defeated the Syrians at Helam. Next, Joab with the whole army and the king's bodyguard (including Uriah: 2 Samuel 23:39) besieged Ammon (2 Samuel 11; 1 Chronicles 19; 20). The ark apparently accompanied the camp (2 Samuel 11:11), a rare occurrence (1 Samuel 4:3-6); but perhaps what is meant is only that the ark at Jerusalem was "in a tent" (2 Samuel 7:2; 2 Samuel 7:6) as was the army at Rabbah under Jehovah the Lord of the ark, therefore Uriah would not go home to his house. The siege lasted nearly two years, from David's first connection with Bathsheba to the birth of Solomon. The Ammonites made unsuccessful sallies (2 Samuel 11:17). Joab finally took the lower town, which, from the stream rising in it and flowing through it perennially, is called "the city of waters," and from the king's palace "the royal city." Then in a characteristic speech, half jest half earnest (2 Samuel 12:28, compare 2 Samuel 19:6-7), which shows the power he had gained over David through David's secret and wicked commission (2 Samuel 11:14-15), he invited David to crown the capture by taking the citadel lest if he (Joab) took it, it should be called after his name. Josephus (Ant. 7:7, section 5) says the fortress had but one well, inadequate to supply the wants of its crowded occupants. (On its capture by David, and his putting the people under saws and harrows to cut them in pieces in retaliation for their cruelties, see DAVID, also Judges 1:7; 1 Samuel 11:2.) Amos (Amos 1:14) speaks of its "wall" and "palaces" and "king" (perhaps Moloch) about to be judged by God. So also Jeremiah 49:2-3. Nebuchadnezzar attacked Ammon because of Baalis their king having instigated Ishmael to slay Gedaliah the Chaldaean governor (Jeremiah 40:14). See 1 Maccabees 5:6 as to subsequent judgments on Ammon. Ezekiel (Ezekiel 21:20) depicts Nebuchadnezzar's divination to decide whether he should attack Jerusalem or Rabbah the first. Jerusalem's fall should be followed by that of Rabbah (compare Josephus, Ant. 10:9, section 7). Under the Ptolemies Rabbah still continued of importance as supplying water for the journey across the desert, and was made a garrison for repelling the Bedouins of that quarter. Ptolemy Philadelphus named it Philadelphia. Josephus (B. J. 3:3, section 3) includes Rabbah in Decapolis. Now Amman, on a tributary (Moiet Amman) of the Zerka river (Jabbok), 19 miles S.E. of Es Salt ("Ramoth Gilead"), 22 E. of Jordan. Its temple, theater, and forum are remarkable ruins. Eight Corinthian columns of the theater (the largest known in Syria) remain. It has become as foretold "a stable for camels, a couching place for flocks a desolate heap" (Ezekiel 25:5). Its coins bear the image of Astarte, and the word Heracleion from Hercules the idol which succeeded Moloch. The large square stones of the citadel are put together without cement, the massive walls are evidently very ancient. 2. Rabbah of Moab, called in the Bible Ar, in the highlands S.E. of the Dead Sea. 3. Rabbah of Judah, near Kirjath Jearim (Joshua 15:60).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rabbah/

Rabbah in Hitchcock's Bible Names

great; powerful; contentious

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Rabbah/

Rabbah Scripture - Jeremiah 49:2

Therefore, behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will cause an alarm of war to be heard in Rabbah of the Ammonites; and it shall be a desolate heap, and her daughters shall be burned with fire: then shall Israel be heir unto them that were his heirs, saith the LORD.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/49/

Rabbah Scripture - 2 Samuel 11:1

And it came to pass, after the year was expired, at the time when kings go forth [to battle], that David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the children of Ammon, and besieged Rabbah. But David tarried still at Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/11/

Rabbah Scripture - 2 Samuel 17:27

And it came to pass, when David was come to Mahanaim, that Shobi the son of Nahash of Rabbah of the children of Ammon, and Machir the son of Ammiel of Lodebar, and Barzillai the Gileadite of Rogelim,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/17/

Rabbah Scripture - Jeremiah 49:3

Howl, O Heshbon, for Ai is spoiled: cry, ye daughters of Rabbah, gird you with sackcloth; lament, and run to and fro by the hedges; for their king shall go into captivity, [and] his priests and his princes together.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/49/

Rabbah Scripture - Amos 1:14

But I will kindle a fire in the wall of Rabbah, and it shall devour the palaces thereof, with shouting in the day of battle, with a tempest in the day of the whirlwind:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Amos/1/

Rabbah Scripture - Joshua 13:25

And their coast was Jazer, and all the cities of Gilead, and half the land of the children of Ammon, unto Aroer that [is] before Rabbah;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/13/

Rabbah Scripture - Ezekiel 25:5

And I will make Rabbah a stable for camels, and the Ammonites a couchingplace for flocks: and ye shall know that I [am] the LORD.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/25/

Rabbah Scripture - 2 Samuel 12:26

And Joab fought against Rabbah of the children of Ammon, and took the royal city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/12/

Rabbah Scripture - 2 Samuel 12:27

And Joab sent messengers to David, and said, I have fought against Rabbah, and have taken the city of waters.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/12/

Rabbah Scripture - Joshua 15:60

Kirjathbaal, which [is] Kirjathjearim, and Rabbah; two cities with their villages:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/15/

Rabbah Scripture - 2 Samuel 12:29

And David gathered all the people together, and went to Rabbah, and fought against it, and took it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Samuel/12/

Rabbah Scripture - 1 Chronicles 20:1

And it came to pass, that after the year was expired, at the time that kings go out [to battle], Joab led forth the power of the army, and wasted the country of the children of Ammon, and came and besieged Rabbah. But David tarried at Jerusalem. And Joab smote Rabbah, and destroyed it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/20/

Ramah in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ra'-ma (ha-ramah, without the definite article only in Neh 11:33; Jer 31:15): The name denotes height, from root rum, "to be high," and the towns to which it applied seem all to have stood on elevated sites. (1) Codex Vaticanus Arael; Codex Alexandrinus Rhama: A fenced city in the lot assigned to Naphtali (Josh 19:36). Only in this passage is the place referred to. It is probably identical with the modern er-Rameh, a large Christian village on the highway from Cafed to the coast, about 8 miles West-Southwest of that city. To the North rises the mountain range which forms the southern boundary of Upper Galilee. In the valley to the South there is much rich land cultivated by the villagers. The olives grown here are very fine, and fruitful vineyards cover many of the surrounding slopes. No remains of antiquity are to be seen above ground; but the site is one likely to have been occupied in ancient times. (2) Rhama: A city that is mentioned only once, on the boundary of Asher (Josh 19:29). The line of the boundary cannot be followed with certainty; but perhaps we may identify Ramah with the modern Ramiyeh, a village situated on a hill which rises in the midst of a hollow, some 13 miles Southeast of Tyre, and 12 miles East of the Ladder of Tyre. To the Southwest is a marshy lake which dries up in summer. Traces of antiquity are found in the cisterns, a large reservoir and many sarcophagi. To the West is the high hill Belat, with ancient ruins, and remains of a temple of which several columns are still in situ. (3) Codex Vaticanus Rhama; Codex Alexandrinus Iama, and other forms: A city in the territory of Benjamin named between Gibeon and Beeroth (Josh 18:25). The Levite thought of it as a possible resting-place for himself and his concubine on their northward journey (Jdg 19:13). The palm tree of Deborah was between this and Bethel (Jdg 4:5). Baasha, king of Samaria, sought to fortify Ramah against Asa, king of Judah. The latter frustrated the attempt, and carried off the materials which Bassha had collected, and with them fortified against him Geba of Benjamin and Mizpah (1 Ki 15:17; 2 Ch 16:5). Here the captain of Nebuchadnezzar's guard released Jeremiah after he had been carried in bonds from Jerusalem (Jer 40:1). It figures in Isaiah's picture of the Assyrians' approach (Isa 10:29). It is named by Hosea in connection with Gibeah (5:8), and is mentioned as being reoccupied after the exile (Ezr 2:26; Neh 7:30). It was near the traditional tomb of Rachel (Jer 31:15; compare 1 Sam 10:2; Mt 2:18, the King James Version "Rama"). From the passages cited we gather that Ramah lay some distance to the North of Gibeah, and not far from Gibeon...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/RAMAH/

Ramah in Naves Topical Bible

1. Called RAMA Mt 2:18 A city allotted to the tribe of Benjamin Jos 18:25; Jud 19:13 Attempted fortification of, by King Baasha; destruction of, by Asa 1Ki 15:17-22; 2Ch 16:1-6 People of, return from the Babylonian captivity Ezr 2:26; Ne 7:30; 11:33 Jeremiah imprisoned in Jer 40:1 Prophecies concerning Isa 10:29; Jer 31:15; Ho 5:8; Mt 2:18 -2. A city of the territory of the tribe of Asher Jos 19:29 -3. A city of the territory of the tribe of Naphthali Jos 19:36 -4. Also called RAMATHAIM-ZOPHIM A city near Mount Ephraim Jude 1:4,5; 1Sa 1:1 Home of Elkanah 1Sa 1:1,19; 2:11 Home of Samuel 1Sa 1:19,20; 7:17; 8:4; 15:34; 16:13 David flees to 1Sa 19:18 Samuel dies and was buried in 1Sa 25:1; 28:3 -5. RAMAH See RAMOTH-GILEAD

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/RAMAH/

Ramah in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(a hill). This is the name of several places in the holy land. 1. One of the cities of the allotment of Benjamin. Jos 18:25 Its site is at er-Ram, about five miles from Jerusalem, and near to Gibeah. Jud 4:5; 19:13; 1Sa 22:6 Its people returned after the captivity. Ezr 2:26; Ne 7:30 2. The home of Elkanah, Samuel's father, 1Sa 1:19; 2:11 the birthplace of Samuel himself, his home and official residence, the site of his altar ch. 1Sa 7:17; 8:4; 15:34; 16:13 19:18 and finally his burial-place, ch. 1Sa 25:1; 28:3 It is a contracted form of Ramathaim-zophim. All that is directly said as to its situation is that it was in Mount Ephraim, 1Sa 1:1 a district without defined boundaries, The position of Ramah is a much-disputed question. Tradition, however places the residence of Samuel on the lofty and remarkable eminence of Neby Samwil which rises four miles to the northwest of Jerusalem. Since the days of Arcult the tradition appears to have been continuous. Here, then, we are inclined in the present state of the evidence, to place the Ramah of Samuel. 3. One of the nineteen fortified places of Naphtali. Jos 19:36 Dr. Robinson has discovered a Rameh northwest of the Sea of Galilee, about 8 miles east-south-east of Safed. 4. One of the landmarks on the boundary of Asher, Jos 19:29 apparently between Tyre and Zidon. Some place it 3 miles east of Tyre, others 10 miles off and east-southeast of the same city. 5. By this name in 2Ki 8:29 and 2Chr 22:6 only, is designated Ramoth-gilead. 6. A place mentioned in the catalogue of those reinhabited by the Benjamites after their return from the captivity. Ne 11:33

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Ramah/

Ramah in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(Matt. 2:18), the Greek form of Ramah. (1.) A city first mentioned in Josh. 18:25, near Gibeah of Benjamin. It was fortified by Baasha, king of Israel (1 Kings 15:17- 22; 2 Chr. 16:1-6). Asa, king of Judah, employed Benhadad the Syrian king to drive Baasha from this city (1 Kings 15:18, 20). Isaiah (10:29) refers to it, and also Jeremiah, who was once a prisoner there among the other captives of Jerusalem when it was taken by Nebuchadnezzar (Jer. 39:8-12; 40:1). Rachel, whose tomb lies close to Bethlehem, is represented as weeping in Ramah (Jer. 31:15) for her slaughtered children. This prophecy is illustrated and fulfilled in the re-awakening of Rachel's grief at the slaughter of the infants in Bethlehem (Matt. 2:18). It is identified with the modern village of er-Ram, between Gibeon and Beeroth, about 5 miles due north of Jerusalem. (See SAMUEL (2.) A town identified with Rameh, on the border of Asher, about 13 miles south-east of Tyre, "on a solitary hill in the midst of a basin of green fields" (Josh. 19:29). (3.) One of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali (Josh. 19:36), on a mountain slope, about seven and a half miles west- south-west of Safed, and 15 miles west of the north end of the Sea of Galilee, the present large and well-built village of Rameh. (4.) The same as Ramathaim-zophim (q.v.), a town of Mount Ephraim (1 Sam. 1:1, 19). (5.) The same as Ramoth-gilead (q.v.), 2 Kings 8:29; 2 Chr. 22:6.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rama/

Ramah in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

RAMA or RAMAH ("an elevated spot".) 1. In Benjamin (Jeremiah 31:15; Matthew 2:18). The cry of the weeping mothers and of Rachel is poetically represented as heard as far as Rama, on the E. side of the N. road between Jerusalem and Bethel; Rama where Nebuzaradan gathered the captive Jews to take them to Babylon. Not far from Gibeah of Saul (1 Samuel 22:6; Hosea 5:8; Isaiah 10:28- 32). Now Er Ram, five miles from Jerusalem (Judges 4:5; Judges 19:13; Joshua 18:25). There is an Er Ram one mile and a half E. of Bethlehem; but explain Jeremiah 31:15 as above. Baasha fortified it, to prevent his subjects from going S. to Jerusalem to the great feasts, and so joining the kingdom of Judah (1 Kings 15:17-21; 2 Chronicles 16:1- 5). (See BAASHA; ASA.) The coincidence is dear between Rama's being built by Israel, its overthrow by Judah, and the emigration from Israel to Judah owing to Jeroboam's idolatry (1 Kings 12:26; 2 Chronicles 11:14-17); yet the events are named separately, and their connection only inferred by comparison of distinct passages, a minute proof of genuineness. Its people returned after the captivity (Ezra 2:26; Nehemiah 7:30). The Rama, Nehemiah 11:33, was further W. 2. The house of Elkanah, Samuel's father (1 Samuel 1:19; 1 Samuel 2:11). Samuel's birthplace, residence, and place of burial. Here he built an altar to Jehovah (1 Samuel 7:17; 1 Samuel 8:4; 1 Samuel 15:34; 1 Samuel 16:13; 1 Samuel 19:18; 1 Samuel 25:1; 1 Samuel 28:3). Contracted from Ramathaim Zophim, in Mount Ephraim (which included under its name the northern parts of Benjamin, Bethel, and Ataroth: 2 Chronicles 13:19; 2 Chronicles 15:8; Judges 4:5; 1 Samuel 1:1). Muslim, Jewish, and Christian tradition places Samuel's home on the height Neby Samwil, four miles N.W. of Jerusalem, than which it is loftier. Arculf (A.D. 700) identifies it as "Saint Samuel." The professed tomb is a wooden box; below it is a cave excavated like Abraham's burial place at Hebron, from the rock, and dosed against entrance except by a narrow opening in the top, through which pilgrims pass their lamps and petitions to the sacred vault beneath. The city where Samuel anointed Saul (1 Samuel 9-10) was probably not Samuel's own city Rama, for the city of Saul's anointing was near Rachel's sepulchre adjoining Bethlehem (1 Samuel 10:2), whereas Mount Ephraim wherein was Ramathaim Zophim did not reach so far S. Near Neby Samwil, the probable site of Samuel's Rama, is the well of Sechu to which Saul came on his way to Rama, now "Samuel's fountain" near Beit Isku. Beit Haninah (probably Naioth) is near (1 Samuel 19:18-24). Hosea (Hosea 5:8) refers to Rama. The appended "Zophim" distinguishes it from Rama of Benjamin. Elkanah's ancestor Zuph may have been the origin of the "Zophim." 3. A fortress of Naphtali in the mountainous region N.W. of the sea, of Galilee. Now Rameh, eight miles E.S.E. of Safed, on the main track between Akka and the N. of the sea of Galilee, on the slope of a lofty hill. 4. On Asher's boundary between Tyre and Sidon; a Rama is still three miles E. of Tyre. 5. Ramoth Gilead (2 Kings 8:29; 2 Chronicles 22:6). 6. Re-occupied by Benjamin on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:33). Identified by Grove with Ramleh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rama/

Ramah in Hitchcock's Bible Names

same as Ram - elevated; sublime

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/R/Ramah/

Ramah Scripture - 2 Kings 8:29

And king Joram went back to be healed in Jezreel of the wounds which the Syrians had given him at Ramah, when he fought against Hazael king of Syria. And Ahaziah the son of Jehoram king of Judah went down to see Joram the son of Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/8/

Ramah Scripture - 2 Chronicles 22:6

And he returned to be healed in Jezreel because of the wounds which were given him at Ramah, when he fought with Hazael king of Syria. And Azariah the son of Jehoram king of Judah went down to see Jehoram the son of Ahab at Jezreel, because he was sick.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/22/

Ramah Scripture - Joshua 19:29

And [then] the coast turneth to Ramah, and to the strong city Tyre; and the coast turneth to Hosah; and the outgoings thereof are at the sea from the coast to Achzib:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joshua/19/

Ramah Scripture - 1 Kings 15:17

And Baasha king of Israel went up against Judah, and built Ramah, that he might not suffer any to go out or come in to Asa king of Judah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/15/

Ramah Scripture - Jeremiah 40:1

The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD, after that Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had let him go from Ramah, when he had taken him being bound in chains among all that were carried away captive of Jerusalem and Judah, which were carried away captive unto Babylon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/40/

Ramah Scripture - 2 Chronicles 16:1

In the six and thirtieth year of the reign of Asa Baasha king of Israel came up against Judah, and built Ramah, to the intent that he might let none go out or come in to Asa king of Judah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/16/

Ramah Scripture - Jeremiah 31:15

Thus saith the LORD; A voice was heard in Ramah, lamentation, [and] bitter weeping; Rahel weeping for her children refused to be comforted for her children, because they [were] not.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/31/

Ramah Scripture - 1 Kings 15:22

Then king Asa made a proclamation throughout all Judah; none [was] exempted: and they took away the stones of Ramah, and the timber thereof, wherewith Baasha had builded; and king Asa built with them Geba of Benjamin, and Mizpah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/15/

Ramah Scripture - 1 Samuel 1:19

And they rose up in the morning early, and worshipped before the LORD, and returned, and came to their house to Ramah: and Elkanah knew Hannah his wife; and the LORD remembered her.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/1/

Ramah Scripture - 1 Samuel 15:34

Then Samuel went to Ramah; and Saul went up to his house to Gibeah of Saul.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/15/

Rameses in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ra-am'-sez, ram'-e-sez (Ex 1:11), (Gen 47:11; Ex 12:37; Nu 33:3,5) (ra`mecec, ra`amcec; Rhamesse; Egyptian Ra-messu, "Ra created him" (or "it")): 1. The Meaning of "Store-Cities": One of the two "settlements" (mickenoth) built, or "built up," by the Hebrews for the Pharaoh, the other being Pithom, to which the Septuagint adds a third, namely, "On which is Heliopolis," a town near Cairo (Ex 1:11). The Hebrew term mickenoth comes from a root meaning "to settle down" (Arabic sakan, "settlement," Assyrian sakanu or shakanu, "to set"), but it is rendered "strong cities" in Septuagint, "treasure cities" in the King James Version, and (incorrectly) "store- cities" in the Revised Version: The "land of Rameses," where Jacob and his sons settled, was apparently the "field of Zoan" (see ZOAN), thus lying in the Delta East of the Bubastic branch of the Nile. 2. The Meaning of the Name: It is often assumed that no city called Rameses would have existed before the time of Rameses II, or the 14th century BC, though even before Rameses I the name occurs as that of a brother of Horemhib under the XVIIIth Dynasty. The usual translation "Child of Ra" is grammatically incorrect in Egyptian and as Ra was an ancient name for the "sun" it seems possible that a town may have borne the title "Ra created it" very early. The mention of Rameses in Gen (47:11) is often regarded as an anachronism, since no scholar has supposed that Jacob lived as late as the time of Rameses II. This would equally apply to the other notices, and at most would serve to mark the age of the passages in the Pentateuch where Rameses is mentioned, but even this cannot be thought to be proved (see EXODUS). According to De Rouge (see Pierret, Vocab. Hieroglyph., 1875, 143) there were at least three towns in Lower Egypt that bore the name Pa Rames-ses ("city of Rameses"); but Brugsch supposes that the place mentioned in the Old Testament was Zoan, to which Rameses II gave this name when making it his capital in the Delta. Dr. Budge takes the same view, while Dr. Naville and others suppose that the site of Raamses has still to be found. 3. Situation: There appears to have been no certain tradition preserving the site, for though Silvia (about 385 AD) was told that it lay 4 miles from the town of Arabia (see GOSHEN), she found no traces of such a place. Brugsch ("A New City of Rameses, 1876," Aegyptische Zeitschrift, 69) places one such city in the southern part of Memphis itself. Goodwin (Rec. of Past, Old Series, VI, 11) gives an Egyptian letter describing the "city of Rameses-Miamun," which appears to be Zoan, since it was on the seacoast. It was a very prosperous city when this letter was written, and a pa-khennu or "palace city." It had canals full of fish, lakes swarming with birds, fields of lentils, melons, wheat, onions and sesame, gardens of vines, almonds and figs. Ships entered its harbor; the lotus and papyrus grew in its waters. The inhabitants greeted Rameses II with garlands of flowers. Besides wine and mead, of the "conqueror's city," beer was brought to the harbor from the Kati (in Cilicia), and oil from the "Lake Sagabi." There is no reason to suppose that Zoan was less prosperous in the early Hyksos age, when the Hebrews dwelt in its plain, whatever be the conclusion as to the date when the city Rameses received that name. The description above given agrees with the Old Testament account of the possession given by Joseph to his family "in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses" (Gen 47:11).

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/RAAMSES;+RAMESES/

Rameses in Naves Topical Bible

(Called also Raamses.) -The district in Egypt which was inhabited by the Israelites Ge 47:11; Ex 1:11; 12:37; Nu 33:3,5 City of, built by the Israelites as a treasure city for one of the Pharaohs Ex 1:11

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/RAMESES/

Rameses in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(child of the sun), a city and district of lower Egypt. Ge 47:11; Ex 12:37; Nu 33:3,5 This land of Rameses either corresponds to the land of Goshen or was a district of it, more probably the former. The city was one of the two store- cities built for the Pharaoh who first oppressed the children of Israel. Ex 1:11 (It was probably the capital of Goshen and situated in the valley of the Pelusiac mouth of the Nile. McClintock and Strong say that its location is indicated by the present Tell Ramsis, a quadrangular mound near Belbeis. Dr. Brugsch thinks that it was at Zoan-Tanis, the modern San, on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, and that it was built or enlarged by Rameses II and made his capital. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Rameses+or+Ra-amses/

Rameses in Easton's Bible Dictionary

"the land of" (Gen. 47:11), was probably "the land of Goshen" (q.v.) 45:10. After the Hebrews had built Rameses, one of the "treasure cities," it came to be known as the "land" in which that city was built. The city bearing this name (Ex. 12:37) was probably identical with Zoan, which Rameses II. ("son of the sun") rebuilt. It became his special residence, and ranked next in importance and magnificance to Thebes. Huge masses of bricks, made of Nile mud, sun-dried, some of them mixed with stubble, possibly moulded by Jewish hands, still mark the site of Rameses. This was the general rendezvous of the Israelites before they began their march out of Egypt. Called also Raamses (Ex. 1:11).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/R/Rameses/

Rameses in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

There is mentioned in Egyptian monuments RHMSS, son of Aahmes I (Lepsius); the new Pharaoh "that knew not Joseph." The Pharaohs of the 19th dynasty of Rama (Rameses II was the great conqueror) two centuries later have a final -u, Ramessu. In Genesis 47:11 Rama is the name of a district. In Exodus 1:11 Raamses is the city which already existed, but which the Israelites now strengthened as a treasure city. Rameses II fortified and enlarged it long after. Septuagint make Rama the Heroopolis of later times. It and Pithom were on the canal dug under Osirtasin of the 12th dynasty. Derived from Ra-mes, "child of Ra" the sun god. The Egyptians called themselves "children of Ra" front the earliest times, even "Mizraim" may be from Mis-ra. The name Rama would fitly apply to Goshen which was especially associated with sun worship. Aahmes I built cities in the Delta, especially on the eastern quarter from whence the invading shepherds had come, and was likely as restorer of the sun (Ra) worship to have given the name Rama to the treasure city which Israel fortified there, as he gave it also to his son. Besides Pi ("city") should appear before Rama if it were the Egyptian designation from the name of king Rameses. When Rameses II enlarged it its name was Rama Meiamon, not Rama simply. Moreover, when enlarged by him it was the center of a large Egyptian festive population, whereas in Exodus 1:11 it is in the midst of oppressed Israelites. Lepsius makes Aboo Kesheyd to be on the site.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/R/Rameses/

Rameses Scripture - Genesis 47:11

And Joseph placed his father and his brethren, and gave them a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses, as Pharaoh had commanded.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/47/

Rameses Scripture - Numbers 33:3

And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first month; on the morrow after the passover the children of Israel went out with an high hand in the sight of all the Egyptians.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Rameses Scripture - Exodus 12:37

And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand on foot [that were] men, beside children.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/12/

Rameses Scripture - Numbers 33:5

And the children of Israel removed from Rameses, and pitched in Succoth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/33/

Ramoth Gilead in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ra'-moth-gil'-e-ad (ramoth gil'adh; Codex Vaticanus Rhemmath Galadd; Codex Alexandrinus Rhammoth, and other forms): A great and strong city East of the Jordan in the territory of Gad, which played an important part in the wars of Israel. It is first mentioned in connection with the appointment of the Cities of Refuge (Dt 4:43; Josh 20:8). It was assigned to the Merarite Levites (Josh 21:38; 1 Ch 6:80). In these four passages it is called "Ramoth in Gilead" (ramoth ba- gil'adh). This form is given wrongly by the King James Version in 1 Ki 22:3. In all other places the form "Ramoth- gilead" is used.e to the shape of a jaw-bone (Jdg 15:9,14,19). It may have been in Wady es-Sarar, not far from Zorah and Timnath; but the available data do not permit of certain identification. 1. History: Here Ben-geber was placed in charge of one of Solomon's administrative districts (1 Ki 4:13), which included Havvoth-jair and "the region of Argob, which is in Bashan." The city was taken from Omri by the Syrians under Ben-hadad I (Ant., VIII, xv, 3 ff), and even after the defeat of Ben- hadad at Aphek they remained masters of this fortress. In order to recover it for Israel Ahab invited Jehoshaphat of Judah to accompany him in a campaign. Despite the discouragement of Micalab, the royal pair set out on the disastrous enterprise. In their attack on the city Ahab fought in disguise, but was mortally wounded by an arrow from a bow drawn "at a venture" (1 Ki 22:1-40; 2 Ch 18). The attempt was renewed by Ahab's son Joram; but his father's ill fortune followed him, and, heavily wounded, he retired for healing to Jezreel (2 Ki 8:28 ff; 2 Ch 22:5 f). During the king's absence from the camp at Ramoth-gilead Jehu was there anointed king of Israel by Elisha (2 Ki 9:1 ff; 2 Ch 22:7). He proved a swift instrument of vengeance against the doomed house of Ahab. According to Josephus (Ant., IX, vi, 1) the city was taken before Joram's departure. This is confirmed by 2 Ki 9:14 ff. The place is not mentioned again, unless, indeed, it be identical with "Mizpeh" in 1 Macc 5:35. 2. Identification: It is just possible that Ramoth-gilead corresponds to MIZPAH, (1), and to RAMATH-MIZPEH. The spot where Laban and Jacob parted is called both Galeed and Mizpah. Ramath may become Ramoth, as we see in the case of Ramah of the South. Merrill identifies the city with Jerash, the splendid ruins of which lie in Wady ed-Deir, North of the Jabbok. He quotes the Bah Talmud (Makkoth 9b) as placing the Cities of Refuge in pairs, so that those on the East of the Jordan are opposite those on the West Shechem, being the middle ...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/R/RAMOTH-GILEAD/

Ramoth Gilead in Naves Topical Bible

Also called RAMAH 2Ki 8:2; 2Ch 22:6 -A city of the territory of the tribe of Gad, and one of the cities of refuge De 4:43; Jos 20:8; 1Ch 6:80 -One of Solomon's commissaries there 1Ki 4:13 -In the possession of the Syrians 1Ki 22:3 -Besieged by Israel and Judah; Ahab killed there 1Ki 22:29-36; 2Ch 18 -Recovered by Joram; Joram wounded there 2Ki 8:28,29; 9:14,15; 2Ch 22:5,6 -Elisha anoints Jehu to be king there 2Ki 9:1-6

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/R/RAMOTH-GILEAD/

Ramoth Gilead in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(heights of Gilead), one of the great fastnesses on the east of jordan, and the key to an important district. 1Ki 4:13 It was the city of refuge for the tribe of Gad, De 4:43; Jos 20:8; 21:38 and the residence of one of Solomon's commissariat officers. 1Ki 4:13 During the invasion related in 1Ki 15:20 or some subsequent incursion, this important place had seized by Ben-hadad I., king of Syria. The incidents of Ahab's expedition are well known. [AHAB] Later it was taken by Israel, and held in spite of all the efforts of Hazael who was now on the throne of Damascus, to regain it. 2Ki 9:14 Henceforward Ramoth-gilead disappears from our view. Eusebius and Jerome specify the position of Ramoth as 15 miles from Philadelphia (Amman). It may correspond to the site bearing the name of Jel'ad, exactly identical with the ancient Hebrew Gilead, which is four or five miles north of es-Salt, 25 miles east of the Jordan and 13 miles south of the brook Jabbok.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/R/Ramoth-gilead/

Pharpar River in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(swift), the second of the "two rivers of Damascus" --Abana and Pharpar --alluded to by Naaman. 2Ki 5:18 The two principal streams in the district of Damascus are the Barada and the Awaj, the former being the Abana and the latter the Pharpur. The Awaj rises on the southeast slopes of Hermon, and flows into the most southerly of the three lakes or swamps of Damascus.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pharpar/

Pharpar River in Easton's Bible Dictionary

swift, one of the rivers of Damascus (2 Kings 5:12). It has been identified with the 'Awaj, "a small lively river." The whole of the district watered by the 'Awaj is called the Wady el-'Ajam, i.e., "the valley of the Persians", so called for some unknown reason. This river empties itself into the lake or marsh Bahret Hijaneh, on the east of Damascus. One of its branches bears the modern name of Wady Barbar, which is probably a corruption of Pharpar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pharpar/

Pharpar River in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("swift" or else "crooked"). One of the chief rivers of Syria, eight miles from Damascus 2 Kings 5:12); the Awaj, as the Abana is the Baruda. The ridge jebel Aswad separates Pharpar from Damascus. Pharpar rising on the S.E. side of Hermon ends in the bahret Hijaneh, the most southern of the three lakes or swamps of Damascus, due E. 40 miles from its source. Smaller than the Barada, and sometimes dried up in its lower course, which the Barada never is.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pharpar/

Pharpar River in Hitchcock's Bible Names

that produces fruit

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pharpar/

Pharpar River Scripture - 2 Kings 5:12

[Are] not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? may I not wash in them, and be clean? So he turned and went away in a rage.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/5/

Philadelphia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

fil-a-del-'fi-a (Philadelphia: A city of ancient Lydia in Asia Minor on the Cogamus River, 105 miles from Smyrna. It stood upon a terrace 650 ft. above the sea. Behind it are the volcanic cliffs to which the Turks have given the name of Devitt, or "inkwells"; on the other side of the city the land is exceedingly fertile, and there was produced a wine of whose excellence the celebrated Roman poet Virgil wrote. Philadelphia is not so ancient as many of the other cities of Asia Minor, for it was founded after 189 BC on one of the highways which led to the interior. Its name was given to it in honor of Attalus II, because of his loyalty to his elder brother, Eumenes II, king of Lydia. Still another name of the city was Decapolis, because it was considered as one of the ten cities of the plain. A third name which it bore during the 1st century. AD was Neo-kaisaria; it appears upon the coins struck during that period. During the reign of Vespasian, it was called Flavia. Its modern name, Ala- shehir, is considered by some to be a corruption of the Turkish words Allah-shehir, "the city of God," but more likely it is a name given it from the reddish color of the soil. In addition to all of these names it sometimes bore the title of "Little Athens" because of the magnificence of the temples and other public buildings which adorned it. Philadelphia quickly became an important and wealthy trade center, for as the coast cities declined, it grew in power, and retained its importance even until late Byzantine times. One of the Seven Churches of the Book of Revelation (Rev 3:7 ff) was there, and it was the seat of a bishop. As in most Asia Minor cities, many Jews lived there, and they possessed a synagogue. During the reign of Tiberius the city was destroyed by an earthquake, yet it was quickly rebuilt. Frederick Barbarossa entered it while on his crusade in 1190. Twice, in 1306 and 1324, it was besieged by the Seljuk Turks, but it retained its independence until after 1390, when it was captured by the combined forces of the Turks and Byzantines. In 1403 Tamerlane captured it, and, it is said, built about it a wall of the corpses of his victims. Ala-shehir is still a Christian town; one-fourth of its modern population is Greek, and a Greek bishop still makes his home there. One of the chief modern industries is a liquorice factory; in the fields about the city the natives dig for the roots. On the terrace upon which the ancient city stood, the ruins of the castle and the walls may still be seen, and among them is pointed out the foundation of the early church. The place may now best be reached by rail from Smyrna.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHILADELPHIA/

Philadelphia in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Lydia) -One of the seven congregations in Re 1:11; 3:7-13

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PHILADELPHIA/

Philadelphia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

strictly Philadelphi'a (brotherly love), a town on the confines of Lydia and Phrygia Catacecaumene, 25 southeast of Sardis, and built by Attalus II., king of Pergamos, who died B.C. 138. It was situated on the lower slopes of Tmolus, and is still represented by a town called Allah-shehr (city of God). Its elevation is 952 feet above the sea. The original population of Philadelphia. Seems to have been Macedonian; but there was, as appears from Le 3:9 a synagogue of Hellenizing Jews there, as well as a Christian church. (It was the seat of one of "the seven churches of Asia.") The locality was subject to constant earthquakes, which in the time of Strabo rendered even the town walls of Philadelphia unsafe. The expense of reparation was constant, and hence perhaps the poverty of the members of the church. Re 3:8 (The church was highly commended.) Re 3:7-13 Even Gibbon bears the following well-known testimony to the truth of the prophecy, "Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee in the hour of temptation": "At a distance from the sea, forgotten by the (Greek) emperor encompassed, all sides by the Turks, her valiant citizens defended their religion and freedom above fourscore years. Among the Greek colonies and churches of Asia, Philadelphia is still erect, a column in a scene of ruins." "The modern town (Allah-shehr, city of God), although spacious, containing 3000 houses and 10,000 inhabitants, is badly built; the dwellings are mean and the streets filthy. The inhabitants are mostly Turks. A few ruins are found, including remains of a wall and about twenty-five churches. In one place are four strong marble pillars, which once supported the dome of a church. One of the old mosques is believed by the native Christians to have been the church in which assembled the primitive Christians addressed in the Apocalypse." Whitney's Bible Geography.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

brotherly love, a city of Lydia in Asia Minor, about 25 miles south-east of Sardis. It was the seat of one of the "seven churches" (Rev. 3:7-12). It came into the possession of the Turks in A.D. 1392. It has several times been nearly destroyed by earthquakes. It is still a town of considerable size, called Allahshehr, "the city of God."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

In Lydia, on the lower slopes of Tmolus, 28 miles S.E. of Sardis; built by Attalus II, Philadelphus, king of Pergamus, who died. 138 B.C. Nearly destroyed by an earthquake in Tiberius' reign (Tacitus, Annals 2:47). The connection of its church with the Jews causes Christ's address to have Old Testament coloring and imagery (Revelation 3:7-18). It and Smyrna alone of the seven, the most afflicted, receive unmixed praise. To Smyrna the promise is, "the synagogue of Satan" should not prevail against her faithful ones; to Philadelphia, she should even win over some of "the synagogue of Satan," (the Jews who might have been the church of God, but by opposition had become "the synagogue of Satan") to "fall on their faces and confess God is in her of a truth" (1 Corinthians 14:25). Her name expresses "brotherly love," in conflict with legal bondage. Her converts fall low before those whom once they persecuted (Psalm 84:10; Acts 16:29-33). The promise, "him that overcometh I will make a pillar," i.e. immovably firm, stands in contrast to Philadelphia often shaken by earthquakes. Curiously, a portion of a stone church wall topped with arches of brick remains; the building must have been magnificent, and dates from Theodosius. The region being of disintegrated lava was favourable to the vine; and the coins bear the head of Bacchus. This church had but" little strength," i.e. was small in numbers and poor in resources, of small account in men's eyes. The cost of repairing the often shaken city taxed heavily the citizens. Poverty tended to humility; conscious of weakness Philadelphia leant on Christ her strength (2 Corinthians 12:9); so she "kept His word," and when tested did "not deny His name." So "He who hath the key of David, He that openeth and no man shutteth," "set before" Philadelphia an open door which no man can shut. Faithful in keeping the word of Christ's patience (i.e. the persevering endurance which He requires) Philadelphia was kept, i.e. delivered, out of the hour of temptation. "Among the Greek churches of Asia Philadelphia is still erect, a column in a scene of ruins, a pleasing example that the paths of honour and safety may be sometimes the same." (Gibbon.) The Turks call it Allah Shehr, "city of God"; or rather, "beautiful ('alah) city."

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

love of a brother

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia Scripture - Revelation 3:7

And to the angel of the church in Philadelphia write; These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the key of David, he that openeth, and no man shutteth; and shutteth, and no man openeth;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/3/

Philadelphia Scripture - Revelation 1:11

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Philippi in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

fi-lip'-i (Philippoi, ethnic Philippesios, Phil 4:15): 1. Position and Name: A city of Macedonia, situated in 41ø 5' North latitude and 24ø 16' East longitude. It lay on the Egnatian Road, 33 Roman miles from Amphipolis and 21 from Acontisma, in a plain bounded on the East and North by the mountains which lie between the rivers Zygactes and Nestus, on the West by Mt. Pangaeus, on the South by the ridge called in antiquity Symbolum, over which ran the road connecting the city with its seaport, NEAPOLIS (which see), 9 miles distant. This plain, a considerable part of which is marshy in modern, as in ancient, times, is connected with the basin of the Strymon by the valley of the Angites (Herodotus vii.113), which also bore the names Gangas or Gangites (Appian, Bell. Civ. iv.106), the modern Anghista. The ancient name. of Philippi was Crenides (Strabo vii.331; Diodorus xvi.3, 8; Appian, Bell. Civ. iv.105; Stephanus Byz. under the word), so called after the springs which feed the river and the marsh; but it was refounded by Philip II of Macedon, the father of Alexander the Great, and received his name. 2. History: Appian (Bell. Civ. iv.105) and Harpocration say that Crenides was afterward called Daton, and that this name was changed to Philippi, but this statement is open to question, since Daton, which became proverbial among the Greeks for good fortune, possessed, as Strabo tells us (vii.331 fr. 36), "admirably fertile territory, a lake, rivers, dockyards and productive gold mines," whereas Philippi lies, as we have seen, some 9 miles inland. Many modern authorities, therefore, have placed Daton on the coast at or near the site of Neapolis. On the whole, it seems best to adopt the view of Heuzey (Mission archeologique, 35, 62 ff) that Daton was not originally a city, but the whole district which lay immediately to the East of Mt. Pangaeus, including the Philippian plain and the seacoast about Neapolis. On the site of the old foundation of Crenides, from which the Greek settlers had perhaps been driven out by the Thracians about a century previously, the Thasians in 360 BC founded their colony of Daton with the aid of the exiled Athenian statesman Callistratus, in order to exploit the wealth, both agricultural and mineral, of the neighborhood. To Philip, who ascended the Macedonian throne in 359 BC, the possession of this spot seemed of the utmost importance. Not only is the plain itself well watered and of extraordinary fertility, but a strongly-fortified post planted here would secure the natural land-route from Europe to Asia and protect the eastern frontier of Macedonia against Thracian inroads. Above all, the mines of the district might meet his most pressing need, that of an abundant supply of gold. The site was therefore seized in 358 BC, the city was enlarged, strongly fortitled, and renamed, the Thasian settlers either driven out or reinforced, and the mines, worked with characteristic energy, produced over 1,000 talents a year (Diodorus xvi.8) and enabled Philip to issue a gold currency which in the West soon superseded the Persian darics (G.F. Hill, Historical Greek Coins, 80 ff). The revenue thus obtained was of inestimable value to Philip, who not only used it for the development of the Macedonian army, but also proved himself...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHILIPPI/

Philippi in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Macedonia) -Paul preaches in Ac 16:12-40; 20:1-6; 1Th 2:2 -Contributes to the maintenance of Paul Php 4:10-18 -Paul sends Epaphroditus to Php 2:25 -Paul writes a letter to the Christians of Php 1:1

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PHILIPPI/

Philippi in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(named from Philip of Macedonia), a city of Macedonia about nine miles from the sea, to the northwest of the island of Thasos which is twelve miles distant from its port Neapolis, the modern Kavalla. It is situated in a plain between the ranges of Pangaeus and Haemus. The Philippi which St. Paul visited was a Roman colony founded by Augustus after the famous battle of Philippi, fought here between Antony and Octavius and Brutus and Cassius, B.C. 42. The remains which strew the ground near the modern Turkish village Bereketli are no doubt derived from that city. The original town, built by Philip of Macedonia, was probably not exactly on the same site. Philip, when he acquired possession of the site, found there a town named Datus or Datum, which was probably in its origin a factory of the Phoenicians, who were the first that worked the gold-mines in the mountains here, as in the neighboring Thasos. The proximity of the goldmines was of course the origin of so large a city as Philippi, but the plain in which it lies is of extraordinary fertility. The position, too, was on the main road from Rome to Asia, the Via Egnatia, which from Thessalonica to Constantinople followed the same course as the existing post-road. On St. Paul's visits to Philippi, see the following article. At Philippi the gospel was first preached in Europe. Lydia was the first convert. Here too Paul and Silas were imprisoned. Ac 16:23 The Philippians sent contributions to Paul to relieve his temporal wants.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Philippi/

Philippi in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(1.) Formerly Crenides, "the fountain," the capital of the province of Macedonia. It stood near the head of the Sea, about 8 miles north-west of Kavalla. It is now a ruined village, called Philibedjik. Philip of Macedonia fortified the old Thracian town of Crenides, and called it after his own name Philippi (B.C. 359-336). In the time of the Emperor Augustus this city became a Roman colony, i.e., a military settlement of Roman soldiers, there planted for the purpose of controlling the district recently conquered. It was a "miniature Rome," under the municipal law of Rome, and governed by military officers, called duumviri, who were appointed directly from Rome. Having been providentially guided thither, here Paul and his companion Silas preached the gospel and formed the first church in Europe. (See LYDIA -T0002339.) This success stirred up the enmity of the people, and they were "shamefully entreated" (Acts 16:9-40; 1 Thess. 2:2). Paul and Silas at length left this city and proceeded to Amphipolis (q.v.). (2.) When Philip the tetrarch, the son of Herod, succeeded to the government of the northern portion of his kingdom, he enlarged the city of Paneas, and called it Caesarea, in honour of the emperor. But in order to distinguish it from the Caesarea on the sea coast, he added to it subsequently his own name, and called it Caesarea-Philippi (q.v.).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Philippi/

Philippi in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city of Macedon, in a plain between the Pangaeus arid Haemus ranges, nine miles from the sea. Paul from the port Neapolis (Kavalla) on the coast (Acts 16:11) reached Philippi by an ancient paved road over the steep range Symbolum (which runs from the W. end of Haemus to the S. end of Pangaeus) in his second missionary journey, A.D 51. The walls are traced along the stream; at 350 ft. from it is the site of the gate through which Paul went to the place of prayer by the river's (Gangites) side, where the dyer Lydia was converted, the firstfruits of the gospel in Europe. (See LYDIA.) Dyed goods were imported from Thyatira to the parent city Philippi, and were dispersed by pack animals among the mountaineers of Haemus and Pangaeus. The Satriae tribe had the oracle of Dionysus, the Thracian prophet god. The "damsel with the spirit of divination" may have belonged to this shrine, or else to Apollo's (as the spirit is called "Pythoness," Greek), and been hired by the Philippians to divine for hire to the country folk coming to the market. She met Paul several days on his way to the place of prayer, and used to cry out on each occasion "these servants of the most high God announce to us the way of salvation." Paul cast out the spirit; and her owners brought him and Silas before the magistrates, the duumvirs, who inflicted summary chastisement, never imagining they were Romans. Paul keenly felt this wrong (Acts 16:37), and took care subsequently that his Roman privilege should not be set at nought (Acts 22:25; 1 Thessalonians 2:2). Philippi was founded by Philip of Macedon, in the vicinity of the famed gold mines, on the site "the springs" (Kremides). Augustus founded the Roman "colony" to commemorate his victory over Brutus and Cassius Acts 16:12), Acts 16:42 B.C., close to the ancient site, on the main road from Europe to Asia by Brundusium, Dyrrachium, across Epirus to Thessalonica, and so forward by Philippi. Philippi was "the first (i.e. farthest from Rome and first which Paul met in entering Macedon) city of the district" called Macedonia Prima, as lying farthest eastward, not as KJV "the chief city." Thessalonica was chief city of the province, and Amphipolis of the district "Macedonia Prima." A "colony" (accurately so named by Luke as distinguished from the Greek apoikia) was Rome reproduced in miniature in the provinces (Jul. Gellius, 16:13); its inhabitants had Roman citizenship, the right of voting in the Roman tribes, their own senate and magistrates, the Roman law and language. That the Roman "colonia," not the Greek apoikia...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Philippi/

Philippi in Hitchcock's Bible Names

same as Philip - warlike; a lover of horses

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Philippi/

Philippi Scripture - Philippians 1:1

Paul and Timotheus, the servants of Jesus Christ, to all the saints in Christ Jesus which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Philippians/1/

Philippi Scripture - Acts 20:6

And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/20/

Philippi Scripture - 2 Corinthians 13:14

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, [be] with you all. Amen. <[The second [epistle] to the Corinthians was written from Philippi, [a city] of Macedonia, by Titus and Lucas.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Corinthians/13/

Philippi Scripture - Mark 8:27

And Jesus went out, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi: and by the way he asked his disciples, saying unto them, Whom do men say that I am?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/8/

Philippi Scripture - Acts 16:12

And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, [and] a colony: and we were in that city abiding certain days.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/16/

Philippi Scripture - 1 Corinthians 16:24

My love [be] with you all in Christ Jesus. Amen. <[The first [epistle] to the Corinthians was written from Philippi by Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus and Timotheus.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Corinthians/16/

Philippi Scripture - 1 Thessalonians 2:2

But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as ye know, at Philippi, we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Thessalonians/2/

Philippi Scripture - Matthew 16:13

When Jesus came into the coasts of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, saying, Whom do men say that I the Son of man am?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/16/

Philistia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

fi-lis'-ti-a: The country is referred to under various designations in the Old Testament: namely, pelesheth (Philistia) (Ps 60:8 (Hebrew 10); 87:4), 'erets pelishtim, "land of the Philistines" (Gen 21:32,34), geloth hapelishtim; Septuagint ge ton Phulistieim, "the regions of the Philistines" (Josh 13:2). The Egyptian monuments have Puirsatha, Pulsath (Budge), Peleset (Breasted) and Purasati (HGHL), according to the different voweling of the radicals; the Assyrian form is Palastu or Pilistu, which corresponds very closely to the Egyptian and the Hebrew. The extent of the land is indicated in Josh 13:2 as being from the Shihor, or Brook of Egypt (Revised Version), to the border of Ekron, northward. The eastern border was along the Judean foothills on the line of Beth-shemesh (1 Sam 6:9) with the sea on the West. It was a very small country, from 25 to 30 miles in length and with an average width of about half the length, but it was fertile, being an extension of the plain of Sharon, except that along the coast high sand dunes encroached upon the cultivated tract. It contained many towns and villages, the most important being the five so often mentioned in Scripture: Gaza, Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath and Ekron. The population must have been large for the territory, which enabled them to contend successfully with the Israelites, notwithstanding the superiority of position in the hills to the advantage of the latter.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHILISTIA/

Philistia in Naves Topical Bible

The sea coast in the west of the territories of the tribes of Dan and Simeon Ps 60:8; 87:4; 108:9

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PHILISTIA/

Philistia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(Heb. Pelesheth) (land of sojourners). The word thus translated (in) Ps 60:8; 87:4; 108:9 is in the original identical with that elsewhere rendered Israel, which always means land of the Philistines. (Philistia was the plain on the southwest coast of Israel. It was 40 miles long on the coast of the Mediterranean between Gerar and Joppa, and 10 miles wide at the northern end and 20 at the southern.--ED.) This plain has been in all ages remarkable for the extreme richness of its soil. It was also adapted to the growth of military power; for while the itself permitted. the use of war-chariots, which were the chief arm of offence, the occasional elevations which rise out of it offered secure sites for towns and strongholds. It was, moreover, a commercial country: from its position it must have been at all times the great thoroughfare between Phoenicia and Syria in the north and Egypt and Arabia in the south.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Philistia/

Philistia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

=Israel (q.v.), "the land of the Philistines" (Ps. 60:8; 87:4; 108:9). The word is supposed to mean "the land of wanderers" or "of strangers."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Philistia/

Philistia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

See Israel, which is the same word, and originally meant "the land of the PHILISTINES:" (See PALESTINE.) Psalm 60:8; Psalm 87:4; Psalm 108:9.) Caphtorim; Amos 9:7, "the Philistines from Caphtor"; Jeremiah 47:4; Deuteronomy 2:23. Genesis 10:14 "Casluhim, out of whom came Philistine." (See CAPHTORIM; CASLUHIM.) Both came from Mizraim, i.e. Egypt. As in Amos and Jeremiah the Philistines are traced to Caphtor, probably the Casluhim and Caphtorim were tribes which intermingled, the Caphtorim having strengthened the Casluchian colony by immigration; so the Philistines may be said to have come from either (Bochart). Philistia is derived from the Ethiopic falasa "to emigrate," Hebrew palash, "wander." (In the W. of Abyssinia are the Falashas, i.e., emigrants, probably Israelites from Israel.) Successive emigrations of the same race took place into Philistia, first the Casluhim, then the Caphtorim from both of which came the Philistines, who seemingly were in subjection in Caphtor (the northern delta of Egypt), from whence "Jehovah brought them up" (Amos 9:7). (See CAPHTOR.) The objection to the Mizraite origin of the Philistines from their language is answered by the supposition that the Philistine or Caphtorim invaders adopted the language of the Avim whom they conquered (Deuteronomy 2:23). Their uncircumcision was due to their having left Egypt at a date anterior to the Egyptians' adoption (Herodotus ii. 36) of circumcision (compare Jeremiah 9:25-26). The Cherethites were probably Caphtorim, the modern Copts. Keratiya in the Philistine country, at the edge of the Negeb or "south country," and now called "castle of the Fenish," i.e. Philistines, is related to the name Cherethites; so "Philistines" is related to "Pelethites." Their immigration to the neighborhood of Gerar in the south country was before Abraham's time, for he deals with them as a pastoral tribe there (Genesis 21:32; Genesis 21:84; Genesis 26:1; Genesis 26:8). This agrees with the statement (Deuteronomy 2:23) that the Avim dwelt in Hazerim, i.e. in nomadic encampments. By the time of the Exodus the Philistines had become formidable (Exodus 13:17; Exodus 15:14). At Israel's invasion of Canaan they had advanced N. and possessed fully the seacoast plain from the river of Egypt (el Arish) to Ekron in the N. (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47), a confederacy of the five cities (originally Canaanite) Gaza (the leading one), Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (always put last). Each city had its prince (called seren or sar; Joshua 13:3 "lords"): Amos 1:7-8. The opprobrious name given to the shepherd kings, Philition (Herodotus ii. 12) seems related to Philistine. Their plain was famed for its fertility in grain, vines, and olives (Judges 15:5), so that it was the refuge from times of famine (2 Kings 8:2; compare Genesis 26:12). It suited war chariots, while the low hills of the shephelah afforded sites for fortresses. Philistia is an undulating plain, 32 miles long, and from nine to 16 broad, from 30 to 300 ft. above the sea. To the E. lie low spurs culminating in hog's backs running N. and S., and rising in places 1,200 ft. above the sea. To the E. of these the descent is steep, about 500 ft., to valleys E. of which the hill country begins. The sand is gaining on the land, so that one meets often a deep hollow in the sand, and a figtree...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Philistia/

Philistia Scripture - Psalms 87:4

I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon to them that know me: behold Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia; this [man] was born there.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/87/

Philistia Scripture - Psalms 60:8

Moab [is] my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/60/

Philistia Scripture - Psalms 108:9

Moab [is] my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe; over Philistia will I triumph.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/108/

Phoenicia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

fe-nish'-i-a, fe-nish'-anz: 1. The Land 2. The Colonies 3. The People 4. Arts and Manufactures 5. Commerce and Trade 6. Language and Culture 7. Religion 8. History LITERATURE 1. The Land: The term "Phoenicia" is Greek (Phoinike, "land of dates, or palm trees," from phoinix, "the date-palm"). It occurs in the Bible only in Acts (11:19; 15:3; 21:2), the land being generally designated as the "coast" or "borders of Tyre and Sidon" (Mt 15:21; Mk 7:24,31; Lk 6:17). In the Old Testament we find it included in the land belonging to the Canaanites or to Sidon (Gen 10:19; 49:13; Josh 11:8; 1 Ki 17:9). The limits of Phoenicia were indefinite also. It is sometimes used by classic writers as including the coast line from Mt. Cassius on the North to Gaza or beyond on the South, a distance of some 380 miles, or about 400 miles if we include the sweep of indentations and bays and the outstretching of the promontories. But in the stricter sense, it did not extend beyond Gabala (modern Jebleh) on the North, and Mt. Carmel on the South, or some 150 miles. The name was probably first applied to the region opposite Cyprus, from Gabala to Aradus and Marathus, where the date-palm was observed, and then, as it was found in still greater abundance farther South, it was applied to that region also. The palm tree is common on the coins of both Aradus and Tyre, and it still grows on the coast, though not in great abundance. The width of the land also was indefinite, not extending inland beyond the crest of the two ranges of mountains, the Bargylus (Nusairi Mountains) and the Lebanon, which run parallel to the coast and leave but little space between them and the sea for the greater portion of their length. It is doubtful whether the Phoenicians occupied the mountain tracts, but they must have dominated them on the western slopes, since they derived from them timber for their ships and temples. The width of the country probably did not exceed 25 or 30 miles at the most, and in many places it was much less, a very small territory, in fact, but one that played a distinguished role in ancient times. There are few harbors on the whole coast, none in the modern sense, since what few bays and inlets there are afford but slight shelter to modern ships, but those of the ancients found sufficient protection in a number of places, especially by means of artificial harbors, and the facility with which they could be drawn out upon the sandy beach in winter when navigation was suspended. The promontories are few and do not project far into the sea, such as Theu- prosopon South of Tripolis, Ras Beirut and the broad projection South of Tyre including Ras el-`Abyadh and Ras en-Naqura and Ras el-Musheirifeh (see LADDER OF TYRE). The promontory of Carmel is rather more marked than the others, and forms quite an extensive bay, which extends to Acre. The promontory rises to a height of 500 ft. or more near the sea and to more than double that elevation in its course to the Southeast. Mt. Lebanon, which forms the background of Phoenicia for about 100 miles, is a most striking feature of the landscape. It rises to a height of 10,200 ft. in the highest point, East of Tripolis, and to 8,500 in Jebel Sunnin, East of Beirut, and the average elevation is from 5,000 to 6,000 ft. It is rent by deep gorges where the numerous streams have cut their way to the sea, furnishing most varied and picturesque...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHOENICIA;+PHOENICIANS/

Phoenicia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(land of palm trees) a tract of country, of which Tyre and Sidon were the principal cities, to the north of Israel, along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea bounded by that sea on the west, and by the mountain range of Lebanon on the east. The name was not the one by which its native inhabitants called it, but was given to it by the Greeks, from the Greek word for the palm tree. The native name of Phoenicia was Kenaan (Canaan) or Kna, signifying lowland, so named in contrast to the ad joining Aram, i.e. highland, the Hebrew name of Syria. The length of coast to which the name of Phoenicia was applied varied at different times. 1. What may be termed Phoenicia proper was a narrow undulating plain, extending from the pass of Ras el-Beyad or Abyad, the Promontorium Album of the ancients, about six miles south of Tyre, to the Nahr el-Auly, the ancient Bostrenus, two miles north of Sidon. The plain is only 28 miles in length. Its average breadth is about a mile; but near Sidon the mountains retreat to a distance of two miles, and near Tyre to a distance of five miles. 2. A longer district, which afterward became entitled to the name of Phoenicia, extended up the coast to a point marked by the island of Aradus, and by Antaradus toward the north; the southern boundary remaining the same as in Phoenicia proper. Phoenicia, thus defined is estimated to have been about 120 miles in length; while its breadth, between Lebanon and the sea, never exceeded 20 miles, and was generally much less. The whole of Phoenicia proper is well watered by various streams from the adjoining hills. The havens of Tyre and Sidon afforded water of sufficient depth for all the requirements of ancient navigation, and the neighboring range of the Lebanon, in its extensive forests, furnished what then seemed a nearly inexhaustible supply of timber for ship-building. Language and race. --The Phoenicians spoke a branch of the Semitic language so closely allied to Hebrew that Phoenician and Hebrew, though different dialects, may practically be regarded as the same language. Concerning the original race to which the Phoenicians belonged, nothing can be known with certainty, because they are found already established along the Mediterranean Sea at the earliest dawn of authentic history, and for centuries afterward there is no record of their origin. According to Herodotus, vii. 89, they said of themselves in his time that they came in days of old from the shores of the Red Sea and in this there would be nothing in the slightest degree improbable as they spoke a language cognate to that of the Arabians, who inhabited the east coast of that sea. Still neither the truth nor the falsehood of the tradition can now be proved. But there is one point respecting their race which can be proved to be in the highest degree probable, and which has peculiar interest as bearing on the Jews, viz., that the Phoenicians were of the same race as the Canaanites. Commerce, etc. --In regard to Phoenician trade, connected with the Israelites, it must be recollected that up to the time of David not one of the twelve tribes seems to have possessed a single harbor on the seacoast; it was impossible there fore that they could become a commercial people. But from the time that David had conquered Edom, an opening for trade was afforded to the Israelites. Solomon continued this trade with its king, obtained timber from its territory and employed its sailors and workmen. 2Sa 5:11; 1Ki 5:9,17,18 The religion of the Phoenicians, opposed to Monotheism, was a pantheistical personification of the forces of nature and in its most philosophical shadowing forth of the supreme powers it may be said to have represented the male and female principles of production. In its popular form it was especially a worship of the sun, moon and five planets, or, as it might have been expressed according to ancient notions, of the seven planets --the most beautiful and perhaps the most natural form of idolatry ever presented to the human imagination. Their worship was a constant temptation for the Hebrews to Polytheism and idolatry -- 1. Because undoubtedly the Phoenicians, as a great commercial people, were more generally intelligent, and as we should...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Phoenice,+Phoenicia/

Phoenicia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(Acts 21:2). (See PHENICIA -T0002930.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Phoenicia/

Phoenicia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

The Greek name, "the land of the palm." Kenrick supposes the term to express the sunburnt color of the people. The native name was Canaan, "lowland," in contrast to Aram "the highland," Syria. The woman in Matthew 15:22 said to be "of Canaan" in Mark 7:26 is called "Syrophoenician." Phoenice proper was the narrow plain stretching from six miles S. of Tyre to two miles N. of Sidon, 28 miles in all, and from one to two miles broad, a small land to have wielded so mighty an influence. Sidon in the N. is 20 miles from Tyre in the S.; Zarephath lay between. Phoenice in the larger sense extended from the same southern boundary 120 miles northward to Antaradus and the island Aradus, 20 miles broad. Berytus, now Beirut (Ezekiel 47:16; 2 Samuel 8:8 BEROTHAH, Berothai), was 15 geographical miles N. of Sidon. (See ARVAD.) Farther north was Byblus (GEBAL, Ezekiel 27:9). Next is Tripolis. Next Arad or Arvad (Genesis 10:18; Ezekiel 27:8). The soil is fertile except between the river Bostremus and Beirut. Tyre and Sidon were havens sufficient in water depth for the requirements of ancient ships; and Lebanon adjoining supplied timber abundant for shipbuilding. The Phoenicians were the great merchants, sailors, and colonists of the ancient world. The language is Semitic (from Shem), and was acquired by the Hamitic settlers in Canaan from the original Semitic occupants; it probably has a Hamitic element too (these Semitics were related by common Noachic descent to the Hamites, hence the languages too are related). Carthage was a Phoenician colony; Plautus in the Poenulus (5:1) preserves a Carthaginian passage; Phoenician is close related to Hebrew which Abram found spoken in Canaan already (compare Abimelech "father of a king," Melchizedek "king of righteousness." Kirjath Sapher "city of the book"). Thus Tyre is Hebrew tsor, "rock"; Sidon tsidon, "fishing"; Carthage karthada, "new town"; Byrsa botsrah, "citadel," Bozrah Isaiah 63:1. Dido, as David, "beloved"; Hasdrubal "his help is Baal"; Hannibal "grace of Baal "; Hamilcar the god "Milcar's gift." The oldest Phoenician inscribed coins are from Tarsus. Abram originally spoke the language of Ur of the Chaldees, Aramaic, as did Laban (Genesis 11:31; Genesis 31:47); but soon his descendants, as Jacob, spoke the Canaanite or Phoenician Hebrew as their own tongue, compare Deuteronomy 26:5. Accho (Acre), a capital harbor, assigned to Asher, was not occupied by that tribe (Judges 1:31); but remained in the Canaanites' possession. So Israel depended on Phoenice for any small commerce the former had with the W. Under Solomon Phoenice is noted for nautical skill, extensive commerce, mechanical and ornamental art (1 Kings 5:6): "none can skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians"; "cunning to work in gold, silver, brass, iron, purple, blue, and crimson," and "grave grayings" (2 Chronicles 2:7). Hiram cast all the temple vessels and the two pillars Boaz and Jachin for Solomon, and the laver or molten sea (1 Kings 7:21-23). Homer (Iliad 6:289, 23:743; Od. 4:614, 15:417) and Herodotus (1:1, 4:148) confirm Scripture as to their nautical skill, embroidered robes, and silver bowls. Dins (in Josephus, Apion 1:17-18) and Menander (Josephus, Apion 1:18), their own historians, attest their skill in hawing wood and making metal pillars. No artistic excellence, but mechanical processes of art and ornamentation, appear in their extant gems, cylinders, metal bowls plain and embossed...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Phoenicia/

Phoenicia Scripture - Acts 21:2

Acts 21:2 - And finding a ship sailing over unto Phenicia, we went aboard, and set forth.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/21/

Phrygia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

frij'-i-a (Phrugia): A large ancient country of Central Asia Minor, very mountainous and with table-lands reaching 4,000 ft. in height. Its name is derived from Phryges, a tribe from Thrace, which in early times invaded the country and drove out or absorbed the earlier Asiatic inhabitants, among whom were the Hittites. Thus, the Phrygians borrowed much of oriental civilization, especially of art and mythology which they transferred to Europe. To define the boundaries of Phrygia would be exceedingly difficult, for as in the case of other Asia Minor countries, they were always vague and they shifted with nearly every age. The entire country abounds with ruins of former cities and with almost countless rock-hewn tombs, some of which are of very great antiquity. Among the most interesting of the rock sculptures are the beautiful tombs of the kings bearing the names Midas and Gordius, with which classical tradition has made us familiar. It seems that at one period the country may have extended to the Hellespont, even including Troy, but later the Phrygians were driven toward the interior. In Roman times, however, when Paul journeyed there, the country was divided into two parts, one of which was known as Galatian Phrygia, and the other as Asian Phrygia, because it was a part of the Roman province of Asia, but the line between them was never sharply drawn. The Asian Phrygia was the larger of the two divisions, including the greater part of the older country; Galatian Phrygia was small, extending along the Pisidian Mountains, but among its important cities were Antioch, Iconium and Apollonia. About 295 AD, when the province of Asia was no longer kept together, its different parts were known as Phrygia Prima and Phrygia Secunda. That part of Asia Minor is now ruled by a Turkish wall or governor whose residence is in Konia, the ancient Iconium. The population consists not only of Turks, but of Greeks, Armenians, Jews, Kurds and many small tribes of uncertain ancestry, and of peculiar customs and religious practices. The people live mostly in small villages which are scattered throughout the picturesque country. Sheep and goat raising are the leading industries; brigandage is common. According to Acts 2:10, Jews from Phrygia went to Jerusalem, and in Acts 18:23 we learn that many of them were influential and perhaps fanatical. According to Acts 16:6, Paul traversed the country while on his way from Lystra to Iconium and Antioch in Galatian Phrygia. Twice he entered Phrygia in Asia, but on his 2nd journey he was forbidden to preach there. Christianity was introduced into Phrygia by Paul and Barnabas, as we learn from Acts 13:4; 16:1-6; 18:23, yet it did not spread there rapidly. Churches were later founded, perhaps by Timothy or by John, at Colosse, Laodicea and Hierapolis.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHRYGIA/

Phrygia in Naves Topical Bible

(An inland province of Asia Minor) -People from, in Jerusalem Ac 2:10 -Paul in Ac 16:6; 18:23

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PHRYGIA/

Phrygia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(dry, barren). Perhaps there is no geographical term in the New Testament which is less capable of an exact definition. In fact there was no Roman province of Phrygia till considerably after the first establishment of Christianity in the peninsula of Asia Minor. The word was rather ethnological than political, and denoted in a vague manner the western part of the central region of that peninsula. Accordingly, in two of the three places where it is used it is mentioned in a manner not intended to he precise. Ac 16:6; 18:23 By Phrygia we must understand an extensive district in Asia Minor which contributed portions to several Roman provinces, and varying portions at different times. (All over this district the Jews were probably numerous. The Phrygians were a very ancient people, and were supposed to be among the aborigines of Asia Minor. Several bishops from Phrygia were present at the Councils of Nice, A.D. 325, and of Constantinople, A.D. 381, showing the prevalence of Christianity at that time --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Phrygia/

Phrygia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

dry, an irregular and ill-defined district in Asia Minor. It was divided into two parts, the Greater Phrygia on the south, and the Lesser Phrygia on the west. It is the Greater Phrygia that is spoken of in the New Testament. The towns of Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 13:14), Colosse, Hierapolis, Iconium, and Laodicea were situated in it.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Phrygia/

Phrygia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

The W. part of the center of Asia Minor; varying in its definition at different times, and contributing parts to several Roman provinces (Acts 2:10). Paul passed through Phrygia in his second (Acts 16:6) and third (Acts 18:23) missionary journeys. An ethnological not political division. The Taurus range separated Phrygia from Pisidia on the S.; Caria, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia were on its W. and N.; Galatia, Cappadocia, and Lycaonia on the E. It is a tableland. The Phrygia meant in Scripture is the southern portion (called "greater Phrygia") of the region above, and contained Laodicea, Hierapolis, Colosse, and Iconium. It was peopled by an Indo Germanic race from Armenia, who formed the oldest population of Asia Minor.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Phrygia/

Phrygia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

dry; barren

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Phrygia/

Phrygia Scripture - 1 Timothy 6:21

Which some professing have erred concerning the faith. Grace [be] with thee. Amen. <[The first to Timothy was written from Laodicea, which is the chiefest city of Phrygia Pacatiana.]>

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Timothy/6/

Phrygia Scripture - Acts 2:10

Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/2/

Phrygia Scripture - Acts 16:6

Now when they had gone throughout Phrygia and the region of Galatia, and were forbidden of the Holy Ghost to preach the word in Asia,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/16/

Phrygia Scripture - Acts 18:23

And after he had spent some time [there], he departed, and went over [all] the country of Galatia and Phrygia in order, strengthening all the disciples.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/18/

Pisgah in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

piz'-ga (ha-picgah; Phasga, to lelaxeumenon, he laxeute): This name, which has always the definite article, appears only in combination either with ro'sh, "head," "top," or 'ashdoth, not translated in the King James Version save in Dt 4:49, where it is rendered "springs" the Revised Version (British and American) uniformly "slopes," the Revised Version margin "springs." Pisgah is identified with Nebo in Dt 34:1; compare 3:27. "The top of Pisgah, which looketh down upon the desert" marks a stage in the march of the host of Israel (Nu 21:20). Hither Balak brought Balaam to the field of Zophim (Nu 23:14). Here Moses obtained his view of the Promised Land, and died. See NEBO. Many scholars (e.g. Buhl, GAP, 122; Gray, "Numbers," ICC, 291) take Pisgah as the name applying to the mountain range in which the Moab plateau terminates to the West, the "top" or "head" of Pisgah being the point in which the ridge running out westward from the main mass culminates. The summit commands a wide view, and looks down upon the desert. The identification is made surer by the name Tal'at es-Sufa found here, which seems to correspond with the field of Zophim. 'Ashdoth is the construct plural of 'ashedhah (singular form not found), from 'eshedh, "foundation," "bottom," "lower part" (slope); compare Assyrian ishdu, "foundation." Some would, derive it from Aramaic 'ashadh, "to pour," whence "fall" or "slope" (OHL, under the word). Ashdoth-pisgah overlooked the Dead Sea from the East (Dt 3:17; 4:49; Josh 12:3; 13:20). There can be no reasonable doubt that Ashdoth- pisgah signifies the steep slopes of the mountain descending into the contiguous valleys. It is worthy of note that Septuagint does not uniformly render Pisgah by a proper name, but sometimes by a derivative of laxeuo, "to hew" or "to dress stone" (Nu 21:20; 23:14; Dt 3:27; 4:49). Jerome (Onomasticon, under the word Asedoth) gives abscisum as the Latin equivalent of Fasga. He derives Pisgah from pacagh, which, in new Hebrew, means "to split," "to cut off." This suggests a mountain the steep sides of which give it the appearance of having been "cut out." This description applies perfectly to Jebel Neba as viewed from the Dead Sea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PISGAH/

Pisgah in Naves Topical Bible

(A ridge or mountain east of the Jordan River, opposite to Jericho) -The Israelites come to Nu 21:20 -A boundary of the country assigned to the Reubenites and Gadites De 3:17; 4:49; Jos 12:3 -Balaam prophesies on Nu 23:14-24 -Moses views Israel from De 3:27; 34:1-4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PISGAH/

Pisgah in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(section, i.e. peak), Nu 21:20; 23:14; De 3:27; 34:1 a mountain range or district, the same as or a part of, that called the mountains of Abarim. Comp. De 32:49 with Deut 34:1 It lay on the east of Jordan contiguous to the field of Moab, and immediately opposite Jericho. Its highest point or summit --its "head"--was Mount Nebo. [See NEBO]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pisgah/

Pisgah in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a part, a mountain summit in the land of Moab, in the territory of Reuben, where Balak offered up sacrifices (Num. 21:20; 23:14), and from which Moses viewed the promised land (Deut. 3:27). It is probably the modern Jebel Siaghah. (See NEBO

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pisgah/

Pisgah in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A ridge of the Abarim mountains W. from Heshbon. Nebo was a town on, or near, that ridge, lying on its western slope (Numbers 21:20; Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38; Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1). From Pisgah, Israel gained their first view of the Dead Sea and Jordan valley; hence Moses too viewed the land of promise. The correct designation for the mount is not "Nebo" (which has become usual for convenience sake) but "the mountain adjoining Nebo." In Scripture Nebo denotes only the town (Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 48:1-22). The uniform peakless nature of Pisgah caused its parts to be distinguished only by the names of the adjacent villages. It always has the article "THE Pisgah" E. of Jordan, near "the field of Moab, opposite Jericho." The field of Zophim was on it Ashsoth-Pisgah; Deuteronomy 3:17. frontASHDOTH-PISGAH.) Pisgah is derived from paasag "to divide," a detached range of Abarim. Tristram from a point about 4,500 ft. high, three miles S.W. of Heshbon and one and a half W. of Main, saw to the N. and E. the Gilead hills, and the vast Belka ocean of grain and grass; to the S., Her and Seir of Arabia; to the W., the Dead Sea and Jordan valley and the familiar objects near Jerusalem; and over Jordan, Gerizim's round top, and further the Esdraelon plain and the shoulder of Carmel; to the N. rose Tabor's outline, Gilboa and little Hermon (jebel Duhy); in front rose Ajlun's dark forests, ending in Mount Gilead, behind Es Salt (Ramoth Gilead) The name Pisgah survives only on the N.W. end of the Dead Sea, in the Ras el Feshkah (Hebrew: Rosh ha-Pisgah, "top of Pisgah"). Jebel Siugah ("fragment") probably answers to Pisgah. It is "over against Jericho," and the view corresponds. It is a fragment cut off by declivities on all sides, and separated from Nebo by the wady Haisa.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pisgah/

Pisgah in Hitchcock's Bible Names

hill; eminence; fortress

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pisgah/

Pisgah Scripture - Deuteronomy 3:27

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah, and lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward, and behold [it] with thine eyes: for thou shalt not go over this Jordan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/3/

Pisgah Scripture - Deuteronomy 4:49

And all the plain on this side Jordan eastward, even unto the sea of the plain, under the springs of Pisgah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/4/

Pisgah Scripture - Deuteronomy 34:1

And Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, that [is] over against Jericho. And the LORD shewed him all the land of Gilead, unto Dan,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/34/

Pisgah Scripture - Numbers 23:14

And he brought him into the field of Zophim, to the top of Pisgah, and built seven altars, and offered a bullock and a ram on [every] altar.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/23/

Pisgah Scripture - Numbers 21:20

And from Bamoth [in] the valley, that [is] in the country of Moab, to the top of Pisgah, which looketh toward Jeshimon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/21/

Pisidia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pi-sid'-i-a (ten Pisidian (Acts 14:24); in Acts 13:14, Codices Sinaitica, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Ephraemi give Antiocheian ten Pisidian, "the Pisidian Antioch," the other manuscripts, Antiocheian tes Pisidias, "Antioch of Pisidia." The former, but not the latter, reading correctly describes the condition of affairs at the time when Paul traveled in the country; see below): 1. Situation and History: Pisidia, as a strict geographical term, was the name given to the huge block of mountain country stretching northward from the Taurus range where the latter overlooked the Pamphylian coast land, to the valleys which connected Apamea with Antioch, and Antioch with Iconium. It was bounded by Lycia on the West, by the Phrygian country on the North, and by Isauria on the East; but there is no natural boundary between Pisidia and Isauria, and the frontier was never strictly drawn. The name is used in its geographical sense in the Anabasis of Xenophon, who informs us that the Pisidians were independent of the king of Persia at the end of the 5th century BC. Alexander the Great had difficulty in reducing the Pisidian cities, and throughout ancient history we find the Pisidian mountains described as the home of a turbulent and warlike people, given to robbery and pillage. The task of subjugating them was entrusted by the Romans to the Galatian king Amyntas, and, at his death in 25 BC, Pisidia passed with the rest of his possessions into the Roman province Galatia. Augustus now took seriously in hand the pacification of Pisidia and the Isaurian mountains on the East Five military colonies were founded in Pisidia and the eastern mountains--Cremna, Comama, Olbasa, Parlais and Lystra--and all were connected by military roads with the main garrison city Antioch, which lay in Galatian Phrygia, near the northern border of Pisidia. An inscription discovered in 1912 shows that Quirinius, who is mentioned in Lk 2:2 as governor of Syria in the year of Christ's birth, was an honorary magistrate of the colony of Antioch; his connection with Antioch dates from his campaign against the Homonades--who had resisted and killed Amyntas--about 8 BC (see Ramsay in The Expositor, November, 1912, 385 ff, 406). The military system set up in Pisidia was based on that of Antioch, and from this fact, and from its proximity to Pisidia, Antioch derived its title "the Pisidian," which served to distinguish it from the other cities called Antioch. It is by a mistake arising from confusion with a later political arrangement that Antioch is designated "of Pisidia" in the majority of the manuscripts. Pisidia remained part of the province Galatia till 74 AD, when the greater (southern) part of it was assigned to the new double province Lycia-Pamphylia, and the cities in this portion of Pisidia now ranked as Pamphylian. The northern part of Pisidia continued to belong to Galatia, until, in the time of Diocletian, the southern part of the province Galatia (including the cities of Antioch and Iconium), with parts of Lycaonia and Asia, were formed Into a province called Pisidia, with Antioch as capital. Antioch was now for the first time correctly described as a city "of Pisidia," although there is reason to believe that the term "Pisidia" had already been extended northward in popular usage to include part at least of the Phrygian region of Galatia. This perhaps explains the reading "Antioch of Pisidia" in the Codex Bezae, whose readings usually reflect the conditions of the 2nd century of our era in Asia Minor. This use of the term was of course political and administrative; Antioch continued...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PISIDIA/

Pisidia in Naves Topical Bible

(A province in Asia Minor) -Paul visits Ac 13:14; 14:24

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PISIDIA/

Pisidia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(pitchy) was a district in Asia Minor north of Pamphylia, and reached to and was partly included in Phrygia. Thus Antioch in Pisidia was sometimes called a Phrygian town. St. Paul passed through Pisidia twice, with Barnabas, on the first missionary journey, i.e., both in going from Perga to Iconium, Ac 13:13,14,51 and in returning. Ac 14:21,24,25 comp. 2Tim 3:11 It is probable also that he traversed the northern part of the district, with Silas and Timotheus, on the second missionary journey, Ac 18:8 but the word Pisidia does not occur except in reference to the former journey.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pisidia/

Pisidia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a district in Asia Minor, to the north of Pamphylia. The Taurus range of mountains extends through it. Antioch, one of its chief cities, was twice visited by Paul (Acts 13:14; 14:21- 24).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pisidia/

Pisidia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

In Asia Minor, bounded on the N. by Phrygia, on the W. by Phrygia and Lycia, S. by Pamphylia, E. by Lycaonia and Cilicia. It stretched along the Taurus range. Paul passed through Pisidia twice on his first missionary tour; in going from Perga to Iconium, and in returning (Acts 13:13-14; Acts 13:51; Acts 14:21; Acts 14:24-25; 2 Timothy 3:11). The wild and rugged nature of the country makes it likely that it was the scene of Paul's "perils of robbers" and "rivers" (2 Corinthians 11:26). Antioch of Pisidia was the scene of Paul's striking sermon, Acts 13:16-41.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pisidia/

Paphos Scripture - Acts 13:6

And when they had gone through the isle unto Paphos, they found a certain sorcerer, a false prophet, a Jew, whose name [was] Barjesus:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Paran in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pa'-ran, (pa'ran, 'el-pa'ran; Pharan): (1) El-paran (Gen 14:6) was the point farthest South reached by the kings. Septuagint renders 'el by terebinthos, and reads, "unto the terebinth of Paran." The evidence is slender, but it is not unreasonable to suppose that this is the place elsewhere (Dt 2:8; 1 Ki 9:26, etc.) called Elath or Eloth ('el with feminine termination), a seaport town which gave its name to the Aelanitic Gulf (modern Gulf of `Aqaba), not far from the wilderness of Paran (2). (2) Many places named in the narrative of the wanderings lay within the Wilderness of Paran (Nu 10:12; 13:21; 27:14; compare 13:3,16, etc.). It is identified with the high limestone plateau of Ettih, stretching from the Southwest of the Dead Sea to Sinai along the west side of the Arabah. This wilderness offered hospitality to Ishmael when driven from his father's tent (Gen 21:21). Hither also came David when bereaved of Samuel's protection (1 Sam 25:1). (3) Mount Paran (Dt 33:2; Hab 3:3) may be either Jebel Maqrah, 29 miles South of `Ain Kadis (Kadesh-barnea), and 130 miles North of Sinai (Palmer, Desert of the Exodus, 510); or the higher and more imposing range of mountains West of the Gulf of `Aqaba. This is the more probable if El- paran is rightly identified with Elath. (4) Some place named Paran would seem to be referred to in Dt 1:1; but no trace of such a city has yet been found. Paran in 1 Ki 11:18 doubtless refers to the district West of the Arabah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PARAN,+EL-PARAN/

Paran in Naves Topical Bible

Desert or wilderness of Ge 21:21; Nu 10:12; 12:16; 13:3,26; De 1:1 -Mountains of De 33:2; Hab 3:3 -Israelites encamp in Nu 12:16 -David takes refuge in 1Sa 25:1 -Hadad flees to 1Ki 11:17,18

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PARAN/

Paran in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(peace of caverns), a desert or wilderness, bounded on the north by Israel, on the east by the valley of Arabah, on the south by the desert of Sinai, and on the west by the wilderness of Etham, which separated it from the Gulf of Suez and Egypt. The first notice of Paran is in connection with the invasion of the confederate kings. Ge 14:6 The detailed itinerary of the children of Israel in Nu 33:1 ... does not mention Paran because it was the name of a wide region; but the many stations in Paran are recorded, chs. 17-36. and probably all the eighteen stations were mentioned between Hazeroth and Kadesh were in Paran. Through this very wide wilderness, from pasture to pasture as do modern Arab tribes, the Israelites wandered in irregular lines of march. This region through which the Israelites journeyed so long is now called by the name it has borne for ages --Bedu et- Tih, "the wilderness of wandering." ("Bible Geography," Whitney.) "Mount" Paran occurs only in two poetic passages, De 33:2; Habb 3:3 It probably denotes the northwestern member of the Sinaitic mountain group which lies adjacent to the Wady Teiran. (It is probably the ridge or series of ridges lying on the northeastern part of the desert of Paran, not far from Kadesh. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Paran,+El-paran/

Paran in Easton's Bible Dictionary

abounding in foliage, or abounding in caverns, (Gen. 21:21), a desert tract forming the north-eastern division of the peninsula of Sinai, lying between the 'Arabah on the east and the wilderness of Shur on the west. It is intersected in a north-western direction by the Wady el-'Arish. It bears the modern name of Badiet et-Tih, i.e., "the desert of the wanderings." This district, through which the children of Israel wandered, lay three days' march from Sinai (Num. 10:12, 33). From Kadesh, in this wilderness, spies (q.v.) were sent to spy the land (13:3, 26). Here, long afterwards, David found refuge from Saul (1 Sam. 25:1, 4).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Paran/

Paran in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

EL PARAN. The Et Tih ("the wanderings") desert, N. of the wilderness of Sinai. Israel passed from the latter into Paran on their way N. toward Kadesh. frontKADESH.) (Numbers 10:12; Numbers 13:26). Paran comprises one third of the peninsula which lies between Egypt and Canaan, the eastern half of the limestone plateau which forms the center of the peninsula. Bounded on the N. by southern Canaan; on the W. by the brook or river of Egypt, parting it from Shur wilderness, the other half of the plateau; on the S. by the great sand belt sweeping across the peninsula in a concave northward line from gulf to gulf, and forming the demarcation between it and Sinai; on the E. by the northern part of the Elanitic gulf, and the Arabah dividing it from the Edom mountains. The Zin (not Sin) wilderness, Canaan's (Numbers 34:3) immediate boundary, was its N.E. extremity, from whence Kadesh is spoken of as in Zin wilderness or in Paran (Numbers 13:26; Numbers 20:1.) In 1 Samuel 25:1-2 the southern parts of Canaan are called Paran. The beautiful wady Feiran is probably distinct (Speaker's Commentary, Numbers 10:12). Phara, a Roman station between the heads of the two gulfs, takes its name from Paran. Paran is a dreary waste of chalk covered with coarse gravel, black flint, and drifting sand, crossed by watercourses and low horizontal hills. Not so wild looking as the Arabah, nor yet relieved by such fertile valleys as lie amidst the granite mountains of Sinai. Vegetation would probably cover the level plains, which have red clay soil in parts, but for the reckless destruction of trees for charcoal, so that the winter rains run at once to waste. Ishmael's dwelling (Genesis 21:21; Genesis 21:14; compare Genesis 14:6). "Mount Paran" in Deuteronomy 33:2 is the range forming the northern boundary of the desert of Sinai. In Deuteronomy 1:1 Paran is either Mount Paran or a city mentioned, by Eusebius and Jerome near the mountain. The Paran of Hadad the Edomite (1 Kings 11:18) lay to N.W. or the Egyptian side of Horeb, between Midian and Egypt. Capt. Burton has found extensive mineral districts in Midian, the northern Being little worked, the southern with many traces of ancient labor, shafting and tunneling. Silver and copper abound in northern, gold in southern, and turquoise in northern southern, and central Midian. How strikingly accurate are Scripture details! We should never have guessed that a nomadic people like the Midianites would have wrought mines; but research confirms fully the truth of Scripture, which represents them as having ornaments and tablets of gold, and chains for their camels' necks. The spoils from Midian (Numbers 31:50-53) included gold (of which was offered to Jehovah 16,750 shekels!), silver, brass, iron, tin, and lead. The gold taken by Gideon from them was so enormous as to suffice for making a golden ephod (Judges 8:24-27). The Haj route from Egypt by Elath to Mecca still runs through the Paran desert. Hadad would take that road to Egypt, "taking men with them out of Paran" as guides through the desert. Seir (Edom and Teman), Sinai, and Paran are comparatively adjacent, and therefore are associated together in God's giving the law (Habakkuk 3:3), as in Deuteronomy 33:2.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Paran/

Paran in Hitchcock's Bible Names

beauty; glory; ornament

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Paran/

Paran Scripture - Numbers 13:26

And they went and came to Moses, and to Aaron, and to all the congregation of the children of Israel, unto the wilderness of Paran, to Kadesh; and brought back word unto them, and unto all the congregation, and shewed them the fruit of the land.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/13/

Paran Scripture - Numbers 10:12

And the children of Israel took their journeys out of the wilderness of Sinai; and the cloud rested in the wilderness of Paran.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/10/

Paran Scripture - Deuteronomy 1:1

These [be] the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on this side Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain over against the Red [sea], between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/1/

Paran Scripture - 1 Samuel 25:1

And Samuel died; and all the Israelites were gathered together, and lamented him, and buried him in his house at Ramah. And David arose, and went down to the wilderness of Paran.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Samuel/25/

Paran Scripture - Deuteronomy 33:2

And he said, The LORD came from Sinai, and rose up from Seir unto them; he shined forth from mount Paran, and he came with ten thousands of saints: from his right hand [went] a fiery law for them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/33/

Paran Scripture - Habakkuk 3:3

God came from Teman, and the Holy One from mount Paran. Selah. His glory covered the heavens, and the earth was full of his praise.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Habakkuk/3/

Paran Scripture - Numbers 13:3

And Moses by the commandment of the LORD sent them from the wilderness of Paran: all those men [were] heads of the children of Israel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/13/

Paran Scripture - Genesis 21:21

And he dwelt in the wilderness of Paran: and his mother took him a wife out of the land of Egypt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/21/

Paran Scripture - Numbers 12:16

And afterward the people removed from Hazeroth, and pitched in the wilderness of Paran.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/12/

Paran Scripture - 1 Kings 11:18

And they arose out of Midian, and came to Paran: and they took men with them out of Paran, and they came to Egypt, unto Pharaoh king of Egypt; which gave him an house, and appointed him victuals, and gave him land.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/11/

Patmos in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pat'-mos (Patomos; Italian: San Giovanni di Patino): A Turkish island of the group Sporades, Southwest of Samos, mentioned once in the Bible, Rev 1:9, "I, John .... was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God and the testimony of Jesus" (dia ton logon tou theou kai ten marturian Iesou). The island is 10 miles long, and about 6 broad along the northern coast. It is for the most part rocky. The highest part is Mount Elias, which rises to a height of over 800 ft. As in Greece, and in the adjacent mainland of Asia Minor, the land is treeless. Near the city of Patmos there is a good harbor. A famous monastery, Christodulos, was founded on the island in 1088. Near this is a thriving school, attended by students from all parts of the Archipelago. The population of the island numbers 3,000, almost entirely Greek. The ancient capital was on an isthmus between the inlets of La Scala and Merika. Many ruins can still be seen. The huge walls of Cyclopean masonry, similar to those at Tiryns, attest their great age. In Roman times Patmos was one of the many places to which Rome banished her exiles. In 95 AD, according to a tradition preserved by Irenaeus, Eusebius, Jerome and others, John was exiled here- -in the 14th year of the reign of Domitian--whence he returned to Ephesus under Nerva (96 AD). The cave in which he is said to have seen his visions is still pointed out to the traveler. Only a small part of the once valuable library in the monastery of Christodulos is left. Just 100 years ago (1814) Mr. E.D. Clark purchased here the manuscript of Plato which is now in the Bodleian Library, the celebrated Clarkianus, a parchment written in the year 895, and admittedly the best of all for the 1st of the 2 volumes into which the works of Plato were divided for convenience. Patmos is mentioned by Thucydides (iii.33), by Pliny (NH, iv.23), and by Strabo (x.5).

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PATMOS/

Patmos in Naves Topical Bible

(An island in the Aegean Sea) -John, an exile on Re 1:9

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PATMOS/

Patmos in Smiths Bible Dictionary

Re 1:9 a rugged and bare island in the AEgean Sea, 20 miles south of Samos and 24 west of Asia Minor. It was the scene of the banishment of St. John in the reign of Domitian, A.D. 95. Patmos is divided into two nearly equal parts, a northern and a southern, by a very narrow isthmus where, on the east side are the harbor and the town. On the hill to the south, crowning a commanding height, is the celebrated monastery which bears the name of "John the Divine." Halfway up the descent is the cave or grotto where tradition says that St. John received the Revelation.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Patmos/

Patmos in Easton's Bible Dictionary

a small rocky and barren island, one of the group called the "Sporades," in the AEgean Sea. It is mentioned in Scripture only in Rev. 1:9. It was on this island, to which John was banished by the emperor Domitian (A.D. 95), that he received from God the wondrous revelation recorded in his book. This has naturally invested it with the deepest interest for all time. It is now called Patmo. (See JOHN -T0002088.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Patmos/

Patmos in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Revelation 1:9. One of the Sporades. A small rugged island of the Icarian Sea, part of the Aegean; 20 miles S. of Samos, 24 W. of Asia Minor, 25 in circumference. The scene of John's banishment (by Domitian), where he "was in the Spirit on the Lord's day." The rocky solitude suited the sublime nature of the Revelation. On a hill in the southern half of the island is the monastery of John the divine, and the traditional grotto of his receiving the Apocalypse. In the middle ages called Palmosa from its palms; now there is but one, and the island has resumed its old name Patmo or Patino. It is unvisited by Turks, without any mosque, and saddled with moderate tribute, free from piracy, slavery, and any police but their own.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Patmos/

Patmos in Hitchcock's Bible Names

mortal

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Patmos/

Patmos Scripture - Revelation 1:9

I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ, was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Penuel in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pe-nu'-el, pen'-u-el.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PENUEL/

Penuel in Naves Topical Bible

1. Also called PENIEL City built where Jacob wrestled with the angel Ge 32:31; Jud 8:8,9,17; 1Ki 12:25 -2. Chief of Gedor 1Ch 4:4 -3. A Benjamite 1Ch 8:25

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PENUEL/

Penuel in Smiths Bible Dictionary

[PENIEL]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Penuel/

Penuel in Easton's Bible Dictionary

face of God, a place not far from Succoth, on the east of the Jordan and north of the river Jabbok. It is also called "Peniel." Here Jacob wrestled (Gen. 32:24-32) "with a man" ("the angel", Hos. 12:4. Jacob says of him, "I have seen God face to face") "till the break of day." A town was afterwards built there (Judg. 8:8; 1 Kings 12:25). The men of this place refused to succour Gideon and his little army when they were in pursuit of the Midianites (Judg. 8:1-21). On his return, Gideon slew the men of this city and razed its lofty watch-tower to the ground.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Penuel/

Penuel in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(See PENIEL.) Between Jabbok and Succoth (Genesis 32:22-30- 31; Genesis 33:17). Gideon after Succoth mounted to Penuel (Judges 8:5-8.) (See GIDEON.) It then had a tower. Jeroboam fortified Penuel (1 Kings 12:25.) The men of Penuel, like those of Succoth, as living on the great army route between Canaan and the East, would not help Gideon through fear of Midian's vengeance. Penuel was a frontier fortress built "by the way of them that dwelt in tents" (i.e., their usual route along the course of the Jabbok, where they would have a level way and grass and water, down to the Damieh ford of the Jordan, and so into Canaan). Hence arose Jeroboam's need of rebuilding the tower which Gideon had broken down long before, and which lay due E. from his capital. Four miles above "Canaan's ford" are two conical hills called "hills of gold" (Dhahab) from the yellow sandstone; one is on one side, the other on the other side, of the stream. The western one is larger and has more ruins; the ruins on the eastern one are remarkable, a platform running along its precipitous side, strengthened by a wall 20 ft. high and very solid. The work is cyclopean and of the oldest times; and there are no ruins along the Jabbok course for 50 miles save those. The strange aspect of the place harmonizes with the name given after Jacob's wrestling with the angel of Jehovah, "the Face of God."

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Penuel/

Penuel in Hitchcock's Bible Names

same as Peniel - face or vision of God; that sees God

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Penuel/

Penuel Scripture - 1 Chronicles 4:4

And Penuel the father of Gedor, and Ezer the father of Hushah. These [are] the sons of Hur, the firstborn of Ephratah, the father of Bethlehem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/4/

Penuel Scripture - 1 Kings 12:25

Then Jeroboam built Shechem in mount Ephraim, and dwelt therein; and went out from thence, and built Penuel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/12/

Penuel Scripture - Genesis 32:31

And as he passed over Penuel the sun rose upon him, and he halted upon his thigh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/32/

Penuel Scripture - Judges 8:9

And he spake also unto the men of Penuel, saying, When I come again in peace, I will break down this tower.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Penuel Scripture - Judges 8:17

And he beat down the tower of Penuel, and slew the men of the city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Penuel Scripture - 1 Chronicles 8:25

And Iphedeiah, and Penuel, the sons of Shashak;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/8/

Penuel Scripture - Judges 8:8

And he went up thence to Penuel, and spake unto them likewise: and the men of Penuel answered him as the men of Succoth had answered [him].

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/8/

Pergamos in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pur'-ga-mos, or pur'-ga-mum (he Pergamos, or to Pergamon): 1. History: Pergamos, to which the ancient writers also gave the neuter form of the name, was a city of Mysia of the ancient Roman province of Asia, in the Caicus valley, 3 miles from the river, and about 15 miles from the sea. The Caicus was navigable for small native craft. Two of the tributaries of the Caicus were the Selinus and the Kteios. The former of these rivers flowed through the city; the latter ran along its walls. On the hill between these two streams the first city stood, and there also stood the acropolis, the chief temples, and theaters of the later city. The early people of the town were descendants of Greek colonists, and as early as 420 BC they struck coins of their own. Lysimachus, who possessed the town, deposited there 9,000 talents of gold. Upon his death, Philetaerus (283-263 BC) used this wealth to found the independent Greek dynasty of the Attalid kings. The first of this dynasty to bear the title of king was Attalus I (241-197 BC), a nephew of Philetaerus, and not only did he adorn the city with beautiful buildings until it became the most wonderful city of the East, but he added to his kingdom the countries of Mysia, Lydia, Caria, Pamphylia and Phrygia. Eumenes II (197-159 BC) was the most illustrious king of the dynasty, and during his reign the city reached its greatest height. Art and literature were encouraged, and in the city was a library of 200,000 volumes which later Antony gave to Cleopatra. The books were of parchment which was here first used; hence, the word "parchment," which is derived from the name of the town Pergamos. Of the structures which adorned the city, the most renowned was the altar of Zeus, which was 40 ft. in height, and also one of the wonders of the ancient world. When in 133 BC Attalus III, the last king of the dynasty, died, he gave his kingdom to the Roman government. His son, Aristonicus, however, attempted to seize it for himself, but in 129 he was defeated, and the Roman province of Asia was formed, and Pergamos was made its capital. The term Asia, as here employed, should not be confused with the continent of Asia, nor with Asia Minor. It applied simply to that part of Asia Minor which was then in the possession of the Romans, and formed into the province of which Pergamos was the capital. Upon the establishment of the province of Asia there began a new series of coins struck at Pergamos, which continued into the 3rd century AD. The magnificence of the city continued. 2. Religions: There were beautiful temples to the four great gods Zeus, Dionysus, Athena and Asklepios. To the temple of the latter, invalids from all parts of Asia flocked, and there, while they were sleeping in the court, the god revealed to the priests and physicians by means of dreams the remedies which were necessary to heal their maladies. Thus opportunities of deception were numerous. There was a school of medicine in connection with the temple. Pergamos was chiefly a religious center of the province. A title which it bore was "Thrice Neokoros," meaning that in the city 3 temples had been built to the Roman emperors, in which the emperors...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PERGAMOS;+PERGAMUM/

Pergamos in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Mysia) -One of the "seven congregations" in Re 1:11; 2:12-17

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PERGAMOS/

Pergamos in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(in Revised Version Pergamum) (height, elevation), a city of Mysia, about 3 miles to the north of the river Caicus, and 20 miles from its present mouth. It was the residence of a dynasty of Greek princes founded after the time of Alexander the Great, and usually called the Attalic dynasty, from its founder, Attalus. The sumptuousness of the Attalic princes hall raised Pergamos to the rank of the first city in Asia as regards splendor. The city was noted for its vast, library, containing 200,000 volumes. Here were splendid temples of Zeus or Jupiter, Athene, Apollo and AEsculapius. One of "the seven churches of Asia" was in Pergamos. Re 1:11; 2:12-17 It is called "Satan's seat" by John, which some suppose to refer to the worship of AEsculapius, from the serpent being his characteristic emblem. Others refer it to the persecutions of Christians, which was work of Satan. The modern name of the city is Bergama.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pergamos/

Pergamos in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the chief city of Mysia, in Asia Minor. One of the "seven churches" was planted here (Rev. 1:11; 2:17). It was noted for its wickedness, insomuch that our Lord says "Satan's seat" was there. The church of Pergamos was rebuked for swerving from the truth and embracing the doctrines of Balaam and the Nicolaitanes. Antipas, Christ's "faithful martyr," here sealed his testimony with his blood. This city stood on the banks of the river Caicus, about 20 miles from the sea. It is now called Bergama, and has a population of some twenty thousand, of whom about two thousand profess to be Christians. Parchment (q.v.) was first made here, and was called by the Greeks pergamene, from the name of the city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pergamos/

Pergamos in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A city of Mysia, three miles N. of the River Caicus. Eumenes II (197-159 B.C.) built a beautiful city round an impregnable castle on "the pine-coned rock." Attalus II bequeathed his kingdom to Rome 133 B.C. The library was its great boast; founded by Earaches and destroyed by Caliph Omar. The prepared sheepskins were called pergamena charta from whence our "parchment" is derived. The Nicephorium, or thank offering grove for victory over Antiochus, had an assemblage of temples of idols, Zeus, Athene, Apollo, Aesculapius, Dionysus, Aphrodite. Aesculapius the healing god (Tacitus, Ann. 3:63) was the prominent Pergamean idol (Martial); the Pergamenes on coins are called "the principal "temple care-takers" (neokoroi) of Asia," and their ritual is made by Pausanias a standard. The grove of Aesculapius was recognized by the Roman senate under Tiberius as having right of sanctuary. The serpent (Satan's image) was sacred to him, charms and incantations were among medical agencies then, and Aesculapius was called "saviour." How appropriately the address to the Pergamos church says, "I know thy works, and where thou dwellest, even where Satan's seat (throne) is," etc. Here Antipas, Jesus' "faithful martyr," was slain (Revelation 2:12-16). (See ANTIPAS.) "Thou hast them that hold the doctrine of Beldam who taught Balak to cast a stumbling-block before ... Israel, to eat things sacrificed unto idols and to commit fornication"; this naturally would happen in such an idol-devoted city. The Nicolaitanes persuaded some to escape obloquy by yielding in the test of faithfulness, the eating of idol meats; even further, on the plea of Christian "liberty," to join in fornication which was a regular concomitant of certain idols' worship. Jesus will compensate with "the hidden manna" (in contrast to the occult arts of Aesculapius) the Pergamene Christian who rejects the world's dainties for Christ. Like the incorruptible manna preserved in the sanctuary, the spiritual feast Jesus offers, an incorruptible life of body and soul, is everlasting. The "white stone" is the glistering diamond, the Urim ("light") in the high priest's breast-plate; "none" but the high priest "knew the name" on it, probably Jehovah. As Phinehas was rewarded for his zeal against idol compliances and fornication (to which Balaam seduced Israel), with "an everlasting priesthood," so the heavenly priesthood is the reward of those zealous against New Testament Balaamites. Now Bergamo.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pergamos/

Pergamos in Hitchcock's Bible Names

height; elevation

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pergamos/

Pergamos Scripture - Revelation 1:11

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/1/

Pergamos Scripture - Revelation 2:12

And to the angel of the church in Pergamos write; These things saith he which hath the sharp sword with two edges;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Revelation/2/

Persia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pur'-sha, (parats; Persia; in Assyrian Parsu, Parsua; in Achemenian Persian Parsa, modern Fars): In the Bible (2 Ch 36:20,22,23; Ezr 1:1,8; Est 1:3,14,18; 10:2; Ezek 27:10; 38:5; Dan 8:20; 10:1; 11:2) this name denotes properly the modern province of Fars, not the whole Persian empire. The latter was by its people called Airyaria, the present Iran (from the Sanskrit word arya, "noble"); and even now the Persians never call their country anything but Iran, never "Persia." The province of Persis lay to the East of Elam (Susiana), and stretched from the Persian Gulf to the Great Salt Desert, having Carmania on the Southeast. Its chief cities were Persepolis and Pasargadae. Along the Persian Gulf the land is low, hot and unhealthy, but it soon begins to rise as one travels inland. Most of the province consists of high and steep mountains and plateaus, with fertile valleys. The table-lands in which lie the modern city of Shiraz and the ruins of Persepolis and Pasargadae are well watered and productive. Nearer the desert, however, cultivation grows scanty for want of water. Persia was doubtless in early times included in Elam, and its population was then either Semitic or allied to the Accadians, who founded more than one state in the Babylonian plain. The Aryan Persians seem to have occupied the country in the 8th or 9th century BC.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PERSIA/

Persia in Naves Topical Bible

An empire which extended from India to Ethiopia, comprising one-hundred and twenty-seven provinces Es 1:1; Da 6:1 -Government of, restricted by constitutional limitations Es 8:8; Da 6:8-12 -Municipal governments in, provided with dual governors Ne 3:9,12,16-18 -The princes were advisors in matters of administration Da 6:1-7 -Status of women in; queen sat on the throne with the king Ne 2:6 -Vashti was divorced for refusing to appear before the king's courtiers Es 1:10-22; 2:4 -Israel captive in 2Ch 36:20 -Captivity foretold Ho 13:16 -Men of, in the Tyrian army Eze 27:10 -Rulers of Ahasuerus Es 1:3 -Darius Da 5:31; 6; 9:1 -Artaxerxes I Ezr 4:7-24 -Artaxerxes II Ezr 7; Ne 2; 5:14 -Cyrus 2Ch 36:22,23; Ezr 1; 3:7; 4:3; 5:13,14,17; 6:3; Isa 41:2,3; 44:28; 45:1-4,13; 46:11; 48:14,15 -Princes of Es 1:14 -System of justice Ezr 7:25 -Prophecies concerning Isa 13:17; 21:1-10; Jer 49:34-39; 51:11-64; Eze 32:24,25; 38:5; Da 2:31-45; 5:28; 7; 8; 11:1-4

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PERSIA/

Persia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(pure, splended), Per'sians. Persia proper was a tract of no very large dimensions on the Persian Gulf, which is still known as Fars or Farsistan, a corruption of the ancient appellation. This tract was bounded on the west by Susiana or Elam, on the north by Media on the south by the Persian Gulf and on the east by Carmania. But the name is more commonly applied, both in Scripture and by profane authors to the entire tract which came by degrees to be included within the limits of the Persian empire. This empire extended at one time from India on the east to Egypt and Thrace on the west, and included. besides portions of Europe and Africa, the whole of western Asia between the Black Sea, the Caucasus, the Caspian and the Jaxartes on the north, the Arabian desert the Persian Gulf and the Indian Ocean on the south. The only passage in Scripture where Persia designates the tract which has been called above "Persia proper" is Eze 38:5 Elsewhere the empire is intended. The Persians were of the same race as the Medes, both being branches of the great Aryan stock. 1. Character of the nation. --The Persians were a people of lively and impressible minds, brave and impetuous in war, witty, passionate, for Orientals truthful, not without some spirit of generosity: and of more intellectual capacity than the generality of Asiatics. In the times anterior to Cyrus they were noted for the simplicity of their habits, which offered a strong contrast to the luxuriousness of the Medes; but from the late of the Median overthrow this simplicity began to decline. Polygamy was commonly practiced among them. They were fond of the pleasures of the table. In war they fought bravely, but without discipline. 2. Religion. --The religion which the Persians brought with there into Persia proper seems to have been of a very simple character, differing from natural religion in little except that it was deeply tainted with Dualism. Like the other Aryans, the Persians worshipped one supreme God. They had few temples, and no altars or images. 3. Language. --The Persian language was closely akin to the Sanskrit, or ancient language of India. Modern Persian is its degenerate representative, being largely impregnated with Arabic. 4. History. --The history of Persia begins with the revolt from the Medes and the accession of Cyrus the Great, B.C. 558. Cyrus defeated Croesus, and added the Lydian empire to his dominions. This conquest was followed closely by the submission of the Greek settlements on the Asiatic coast, and by the reduction of Caria and Lycia The empire was soon afterward extended greatly toward the northeast and east. In B.C. 539 or 538, Babylon was attacked, and after a stout defence fell into the hands of Cyrus. This victory first brought the Persians into co...

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Persia/

Persia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

an ancient empire, extending from the Indus to Thrace, and from the Caspian Sea to the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf. The Persians were originally a Medic tribe which settled in Persia, on the eastern side of the Persian Gulf. They were Aryans, their language belonging to the eastern division of the Indo-European group. One of their chiefs, Teispes, conquered Elam in the time of the decay of the Assyrian Empire, and established himself in the district of Anzan. His descendants branched off into two lines, one line ruling in Anzan, while the other remained in Persia. Cyrus II., king of Anzan, finally united the divided power, conquered Media, Lydia, and Babylonia, and carried his arms into the far East. His son, Cambyses, added Egypt to the empire, which, however, fell to pieces after his death. It was reconquered and thoroughly organized by Darius, the son of Hystaspes, whose dominions extended from India to the Danube.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Persia/

Persia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Ezekiel 27:10; Ezekiel 38:5. "Persia proper" was originally a small territory (Herodot. 9:22). On the N. and N.E. lay Media, on the S. the Persian gulf, Elam on the W., on the E. Carmania. Now Furs, Farsistan. Rugged, with pleasant valleys and plains in the mid region and mountains in the N. The S. toward the sea is a hot sandy plain, in places covered with salt. Persepolis (in the beautiful valley of the Bendamir), under Darius Hystaspes, took the place of Pasargadae the ancient capital; of its palace "Chehl Minar," "forty columns," still exist. Alexander in a drunken fit, to please a courtesan, burned the palace. Pasargadae, 40 miles to the N., was noted for Cyrus' tomb (Arrian) with the inscription, "I am Cyrus the Achaemenian." (See CYRUS.) The Persians came originally from the E., from the vicinity of the Sutlej (before the first contact of the Assyrians with Aryan tribes E. of Mount Zagros, 880 B.C.), down the Oxus, then S. of the Caspian Sea to India. There were ten castes or tribes: three noble, three agricultural, four nomadic; of the last were the "Dehavites" or Dali (Ezra 4:9). The Pasargadae were the noble tribes, in which the chief house was that of the Achaemenidae. Darius on the rock of Behistun inscribed: "from antiquity our race have been kings. There are eight of our race who have been kings before me, I am the ninth." frontELAM on its relation to Persia.) The Persian empire stretched at one time from India to Egypt and Thrace, including all western Asia between the Black Sea, the Caucasus, the Caspian, the Jaxartes upon the N., the Arabian desert, Persian gulf, and Indian ocean on the S. Darius in the inscription on his tomb at Nakhsh- irustam enumerates thirty countries besides Persia subject to him, Media, Susiana, Parthia, Aria, Bactria, Sogdiana, Chorasmia, Zarangia, Arachosia, Sattagydia, Gaudaria, India, Scythia, Babylonia, Assyria, Arabia, Egypt, Armenia, Cappadocia, Saparda, Ionia, the Aegean isles, the country of the Scodrae (European), Ionia, the Tacabri, Budians, Cushites, Mardians, and Colchians. The organization of the Persian kingdom and court as they appear in Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther, accords with independent secular historians. The king, a despot, had a council, "seven princes of Persia and Media which see his face and sit the first in the kingdom" (Esther 1:14; Ezra 7:14). So Herodotus (iii. 70-79) and Behistun inscription mention seven chiefs who organized the revolt against Smerdis (the Behistun rock W. of Media has one inscription in three languages, Persian, Babylonian, and Stythic, read by Grotefend). "The law of the Persians and Medes which alters not" (Esther 1:19) also controlled him in some measure. In Scripture we read of 127 provinces (Esther 1:1) with satraps (Esther 3:12; Esther 8:9; Xerxes in boasting enlarged the list; 60 are the nations in his armament according to Herodotus) maintained from the palace (Ezra 4:14), having charge of the revenue, paid partly in money...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Persia/

Persia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

that cuts or divides; a nail; a gryphon; a horseman

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Persia/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 4:7

And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter [was] written in the Syrian tongue, and interpreted in the Syrian tongue.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/4/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 4:3

But Zerubbabel, and Jeshua, and the rest of the chief of the fathers of Israel, said unto them, Ye have nothing to do with us to build an house unto our God; but we ourselves together will build unto the LORD God of Israel, as king Cyrus the king of Persia hath commanded us.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/4/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 9:9

For we [were] bondmen; yet our God hath not forsaken us in our bondage, but hath extended mercy unto us in the sight of the kings of Persia, to give us a reviving, to set up the house of our God, and to repair the desolations thereof, and to give us a wall in Judah and in Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/9/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 6:14

And the elders of the Jews builded, and they prospered through the prophesying of Haggai the prophet and Zechariah the son of Iddo. And they builded, and finished [it], according to the commandment of the God of Israel, and according to the commandment of Cyrus, and Darius, and Artaxerxes king of Persia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/6/

Persia Scripture - 2 Chronicles 36:23

Thus saith Cyrus king of Persia, All the kingdoms of the earth hath the LORD God of heaven given me; and he hath charged me to build him an house in Jerusalem, which [is] in Judah. Who [is there] among you of all his people? The LORD his God [be] with him, and let him go up.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/36/

Persia Scripture - Daniel 10:1

In the third year of Cyrus king of Persia a thing was revealed unto Daniel, whose name was called Belteshazzar; and the thing [was] true, but the time appointed [was] long: and he understood the thing, and had understanding of the vision.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Daniel/10/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 1:2

Thus saith Cyrus king of Persia, The LORD God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth; and he hath charged me to build him an house at Jerusalem, which [is] in Judah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/1/

Persia Scripture - Esther 1:3

In the third year of his reign, he made a feast unto all his princes and his servants; the power of Persia and Media, the nobles and princes of the provinces, [being] before him:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Esther/1/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 3:7

They gave money also unto the masons, and to the carpenters; and meat, and drink, and oil, unto them of Zidon, and to them of Tyre, to bring cedar trees from Lebanon to the sea of Joppa, according to the grant that they had of Cyrus king of Persia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/3/

Persia Scripture - Ezra 4:24

Then ceased the work of the house of God which [is] at Jerusalem. So it ceased unto the second year of the reign of Darius king of Persia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezra/4/

Petra in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pe'-tra.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PETRA/

Petra in Easton's Bible Dictionary

rock, Isa. 16:1, marg. (See SELA -T0003264.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Petra/

Pharpar River in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

far'-par (parpar; Septuagint: Codex Vaticanus Apharpha; Codex Alexandrinus Pharphara): A river of Damascus, mentioned in 2 Ki 5:12, along with the Abana or Amana.e and James, Psalms of Solomon. xliv ff; Nicolas. Doctrines religieuses des juifs, 48 ff.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHARPAR/

Pharpar River in Naves Topical Bible

(A river of Damascus) -Referred to by Naaman 2Ki 5:12

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PHARPAR/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:5

So the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, from the greatest of them even to the least of them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/3/

Nineveh Scripture - Nahum 1:1

The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Nahum/1/

Nineveh Scripture - Genesis 10:12

And Resen between Nineveh and Calah: the same [is] a great city.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 1:2

Arise, go to Nineveh, that great city, and cry against it; for their wickedness is come up before me.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/1/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:3

So Jonah arose, and went unto Nineveh, according to the word of the LORD. Now Nineveh was an exceeding great city of three days' journey.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/3/

Nod in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

nod (nodh): The land of Eden, to which Cain migrated after the murder of his brother and his banishment by Yahweh (Gen 4:16). Conjecture is useless as to the region intended. The ideas of China, India, etc., which some have entertained, are groundless. The territory was evidently at some distance, but where is now undiscoverable.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NOD/

Nod in Naves Topical Bible

Cain lived in Ge 4:16

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NOD/

Nod in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(flight), the land to which Cain fled after the murder of Abel. [CAIN]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/N/Nod/

Nod in Easton's Bible Dictionary

exile; wandering; unrest, a name given to the country to which Cain fled (Gen.4:16). It lay on the east of Eden.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/N/Nod/

Nod in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("wandering".) E. of Eden. Cain's place of flight.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/N/Nod/

Nod in Hitchcock's Bible Names

vagabond; fugitive

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/N/Nod/

Nod Scripture - Genesis 4:16

And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/4/

Noph in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

nof (noph; in Hos 9:6 moph): A name for the Egyptian city Memphis (so the Septuagint), hence, thus rendered in the Revised Version (British and American) (Isa 19:13; Jer 2:16; 44:1; Ezek 30:13,16).

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NOPH/

Noph in Naves Topical Bible

A city of Egypt Jer 2:16 -Prophecy against Jews in Jer 44 -Prophecies against Isa 19:13; Jer 46:13-19; Eze 30:13-16

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NOPH/

Noph in Smiths Bible Dictionary

[MEMPHIS]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/N/Noph/

Noph in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the Hebrew name of an Egyptian city (Isa. 19:13; Jer.2:16; 44:1; 46:14, 19; Ezek. 30:13, 16). In Hos. 9:6 the Hebrew name is Moph, and is translated "Memphis," which is its Greek and Latin form. It was one of the most ancient and important cities of Egypt, and stood a little to the south of the modern Cairo, on the western bank of the Nile. It was the capital of Lower Egypt. Among the ruins found at this place is a colossal statue of Rameses the Great. (See MEMPHIS -T0002478.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/N/Noph/

Noph in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(See MEMPHIS.) In Egypt (Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 2:16; Ezekiel 30:13; Ezekiel 30:16; Hosea 9:6).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/N/Noph/

Noph in Hitchcock's Bible Names

honeycomb; anything that distills or drops

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/N/Noph/

Noph Scripture - Jeremiah 46:14

Declare ye in Egypt, and publish in Migdol, and publish in Noph and in Tahpanhes: say ye, Stand fast, and prepare thee; for the sword shall devour round about thee.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/46/

Noph Scripture - Ezekiel 30:13

Thus saith the Lord GOD; I will also destroy the idols, and I will cause [their] images to cease out of Noph; and there shall be no more a prince of the land of Egypt: and I will put a fear in the land of Egypt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/30/

Noph Scripture - Jeremiah 44:1

The word that came to Jeremiah concerning all the Jews which dwell in the land of Egypt, which dwell at Migdol, and at Tahpanhes, and at Noph, and in the country of Pathros, saying,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/44/

Noph Scripture - Isaiah 19:13

The princes of Zoan are become fools, the princes of Noph are deceived; they have also seduced Egypt, [even they that are] the stay of the tribes thereof.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/19/

Noph Scripture - Jeremiah 46:19

O thou daughter dwelling in Egypt, furnish thyself to go into captivity: for Noph shall be waste and desolate without an inhabitant.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/46/

Noph Scripture - Ezekiel 30:16

And I will set fire in Egypt: Sin shall have great pain, and No shall be rent asunder, and Noph [shall have] distresses daily.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Ezekiel/30/

Noph Scripture - Jeremiah 2:16

Also the children of Noph and Tahapanes have broken the crown of thy head.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/2/

Ophir in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

o'-fer, o'-fir ('owphiyr (Gen 10:29), 'owphir (1 Ki 10:11), 'ophir): 1. Scriptural References: The 11th in order of the sons of Joktan (Gen 10:29 = 1 Ch 1:23). There is a clear reference also to a tribe Ophir (Gen 10:30). Ophir is the name of a land or city somewhere to the South or Southeast of Israel for which Solomon's ships along with Phoenician vessels set out from Ezion-geber at the head of the Gulf of Aqabah, returning with great stores of gold, precious stones and "almug"-wood (1 Ki 9:28; 10:11; 2 Ch 9:10; 1 Ki 22:48; 2 Ch 8:18). We get a fuller list of the wares and also the time taken by the voyage if we assume that the same vessels are referred to in 1 Ki 10:22, "Once every three years came the navy of Tarshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks." The other products may not have been native to the land of Ophir, but it is certain that the gold at least was produced there. This gold was proverbial for its purity, as is witnessed by many references in the Old Testament (Ps 45:9; Job 28:16; Isa 13:12; 1 Ch 29:4), and, in Job 22:24, Ophir is used for fine gold itself. In addition to these notices of Ophir, it is urged that the name. occurs also in two passages under the form "Uphaz" (Jer 10:9; Dan 10:5). 2. Geographical Position: At all times the geographical position of Ophir has been a subject of dispute, the claims of three different regions being principally advanced, namely (1) India and the Far East, (2) Africa, (3) Arabia. (1) India and the Far East. All the wares mentioned are more or less appropriate to India, even including the fuller list of 1 Ki 10:22. "Almug"-wood is conjectured to be the Indian sandal-wood. Another argument is based on the resemblance between the Septuagint form of the word (Sophera) and the Coptic name for India (Sophir). A closer identification is sought with Abhira, a people dwelling at the mouths of the Indus. Supara, an ancient city on the west coast of India near the modern Goa, is also suggested. Again, according to Wildman, the name denotes a vague extension eastward, perhaps...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/O/OPHIR/

Ophir in Naves Topical Bible

1. Son of Joktan Ge 10:29; 1Ch 1:23 -2. A country celebrated for its gold and other valuable merchandise Products of, used by Solomon and Hiram 1Ki 9:28; 10:11; 2Ch 8:18; 9:10 Jehoshaphat sends ships to, which are wrecked at sea 1Ki 22:48 Gold of, proverbial for its fineness 1Ch 29:4; Job 22:24; 28:16; Ps 45:9; Isa 13:12

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/O/OPHIR/

Ophir in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(abundane). 1. The eleventh in order of the sons of Joktan. Ge 10:29; 1Ch 1:23 (B.C. after 2450.) 2. A seaport or region from which the Hebrews in the time of Solomon obtained gold. The gold was proverbial for its fineness, so that "gold of Ophir" is several times used as an expression for fine gold, 1Ch 29:4; Job 28:16; Ps 45:9; Isa 13:12 and in one passage Job 22:24 the word "Ophir" by itself is used for gold of Ophir, and for gold generally. In addition to gold, the vessels brought from Ophir almug wood and precious stones. The precise geographical situation of Ophir has long been a subject of doubt and discussion. The two countries which have divided the opinions of the learned have been Arabia and India, while some have placed it in Africa. In five passages Ophir is mentioned by name - 1Ki 9:28; 10:11; 22:18; 2Ch 8:18; 9:10 If the three passages of the book of Kings are carefully examined, it will be seen that all the information given respecting Ophir is that it was a place or region accessible by sea from Ezion-geber on the Red Sea, from which imports of gold, almug trees and precious stones were brought back by the Tyrian and Hebrew sailors. The author of the tenth chapter of Genesis certainly regarded Ophir as the name of some city, region or tribe in Arabia. It is almost certain that the Ophir of Genesis is the Ophir of the book of Kings. There is no mention, either in the Bible or elsewhere, of any other Ophir; and the idea of there having been two Ophirs evidently arose from a perception of the obvious meaning of the tenth chapter of Genesis on the one hand, coupled with the erroneous opinion, on the other that the Ophir of the book of Kings could not have been in Arabia. (Hence we conclude that Ophir was in southern Arabia, upon the border of the Indian Ocean; for even if all the things brought over in Solomon's ships are not now found in Arabia, but are found in India, yet, there is evidence that they once were known in Arabia and, moreover, Ophir may not have been the original place of production of some of them, but the great market for traffic in them.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/O/Ophir/

Ophir in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(1.) One of the sons of Joktan (Gen. 10:29). (2.) Some region famous for its gold (1 Kings 9:28; 10:11; 22:48; Job 22:24; 28:16; Isa. 13:12). In the LXX. this word is rendered "Sophir," and "Sofir" is the Coptic name for India, which is the rendering of the Arabic version, as also of the Vulgate. Josephus has identified it with the Golden Chersonese, i.e., the Malay peninsula. It is now generally identified with Abhira, at the mouth of the Indus. Much may be said, however, in favour of the opinion that it was somewhere in Arabia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/O/Ophir/

Ophir in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Genesis 10:29. Placed between Sheba and Havilah, Ophir must be in Arabia. Arrian in the Periplus calls Aphar metropolis of the Sabeans. Ptolemy calls it Sapphara, now Zaphar. Eleventh of Joktan's sons. Gesenius explains Ophir, if Semitic, "fruitful region." The Himyaritic ofir means "red". The Mahra people call their country "the ofir country" and the "Red Sea" Bahr Ofir. Aphar means "dust". In 1 Kings 9:26-28; 1 Kings 10:11, Solomon's navy on the Red Sea fetched from Ophir gold and almug trees; and in 1 Kings 10:22, once in three years (which included the stay in Ophir as well as the long coasting voyage) Tarshish ships (i.e. like our term for far voyaging ships, "Indiamen") brough; "gold, silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks." Mauch, an African traveler, found at latitude 20 degrees, 15 minutes S.l longitude 26 degrees 30 minutes E., ruins resembling Solomon's temple, which he connects with Ophir.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/O/Ophir/

Ophir in Hitchcock's Bible Names

fruitful region

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/O/Ophir/

Ophir Scripture - 1 Chronicles 29:4

[Even] three thousand talents of gold, of the gold of Ophir, and seven thousand talents of refined silver, to overlay the walls of the houses [withal]:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/29/

Ophir Scripture - 2 Chronicles 8:18

And Huram sent him by the hands of his servants ships, and servants that had knowledge of the sea; and they went with the servants of Solomon to Ophir, and took thence four hundred and fifty talents of gold, and brought [them] to king Solomon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/8/

Ophir Scripture - 2 Chronicles 9:10

And the servants also of Huram, and the servants of Solomon, which brought gold from Ophir, brought algum trees and precious stones.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/9/

Ophir Scripture - Job 22:24

Then shalt thou lay up gold as dust, and the [gold] of Ophir as the stones of the brooks.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Job/22/

Ophir Scripture - 1 Kings 22:48

Jehoshaphat made ships of Tharshish to go to Ophir for gold: but they went not; for the ships were broken at Eziongeber.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/22/

Ophir Scripture - 1 Kings 9:28

And they came to Ophir, and fetched from thence gold, four hundred and twenty talents, and brought [it] to king Solomon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/9/

Ophir Scripture - Psalms 45:9

Kings' daughters [were] among thy honourable women: upon thy right hand did stand the queen in gold of Ophir.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/45/

Ophir Scripture - Isaiah 13:12

I will make a man more precious than fine gold; even a man than the golden wedge of Ophir.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/13/

Ophir Scripture - Job 28:16

It cannot be valued with the gold of Ophir, with the precious onyx, or the sapphire.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Job/28/

Ophir Scripture - Genesis 10:29

And Ophir, and Havilah, and Jobab: all these [were] the sons of Joktan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Ophir Scripture - 1 Chronicles 1:23

And Ophir, and Havilah, and Jobab. All these [were] the sons of Joktan.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Chronicles/1/

Ophir Scripture - 1 Kings 10:11

And the navy also of Hiram, that brought gold from Ophir, brought in from Ophir great plenty of almug trees, and precious stones.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/1+Kings/10/

Padan Aram in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pad'-an-a'-ram or p.-ar'-am (paddan 'aram; Septuagint Mesopotamia tes Surias; the King James Version Padan-aram): In Gen 48:7, Paddan stands alone, but as the Septuagint, Sam, and Peshitta read "Aram" also, it must in this verse have dropped out of the Massoretic Text. In the time of Abraham, padanu occurs on the Babylonian contract-tablets as a land measure, to which we may compare the Arabic feddan or "ox-gang." In the Assyrian syllabaries it is the equivalent of iklu, "a field," so that Paddan-aram would mean "the field of Aram," and with this we may compare Hos 12:12 (Hebrew 12:13) and the use of the Hebrew sadheh in connection with Moab and Edom (Jdg 5:4; Ruth 1:6). Furthermore, [`padanu] and harranu are given as synonyms with the meaning of "road." Paddan-aram occurs only in the Priestly Code (P), but it corresponds to the "Haran" of the older documents. The versions agree in translating both as Mesopotamia, and identify with the home of the patriarchs and the scene of Jacob's exile the district of Haran to the East of the Upper Euphrates valley. More in harmony with the length of Jacob's flight, as indicated by the time given (Gen 31:22,23), is Harran-el-`Awamid, an ancient site 10 miles to the East of Damascus, which satisfies all the demands of history.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PADDAN-ARAM/

Padan Aram in Smiths Bible Dictionary

By this name, which signifies the table-land of Aram, i.e. Syriac, the Hebrews designated the tract of country which they otherwise called the Aram-naharaim, "Aram of the two of rivers," the Greek Mesopotamia, Ge 24:10 and "the field (Authorized Version,'country') of Syria." Ho 12:13 The term was perhaps more especially applied to that portion which bordered on the Euphrates, to distinguish if from the mountainous districts in the north and northeast of Mesopotamia. It is elsewhere called PADAN simply. Ge 48:7 Abraham obtained a wife for Isaac from Padan- aram. Ge 25:20 Jacob's wives were also from Padan-aram, Ge 28:2,5,6,7; 31:1-8; 33:18

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Padan-aram/

Padan Aram in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the plain of Aram, or the plain of the highlands, (Gen. 25:20; 28:2, 5-7; 31:18, etc.), commonly regarded as the district of Mesopotamia (q.v.) lying around Haran.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Padan-aram/

Padan Aram in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

"The flat land of Aram," contrasted with the more mountainous region of the N. and N.E. of Mesopotamia (Hosea 12:12), "the field (sedeh) of Aram" (Genesis 25:20), the same as Aram Naharaim, "Aram of the two rivers," or Mesopotamia. (See MESOPOTAMIA.) (Genesis 24:10). Aram expresses the highland of Syria, contrasted with the lowland of Canaan. The land between Tigris and Euphrates is a vast flat, except where the Sinjar range intersects it. The home of Rebekah, Laban, etc.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Padan+aram/

Padan Aram in Hitchcock's Bible Names

cultivated field or table-land

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Padan-aram/

Padan Scripture - Genesis 48:7

And as for me, when I came from Padan, Rachel died by me in the land of Canaan in the way, when yet [there was] but a little way to come unto Ephrath: and I buried her there in the way of Ephrath; the same [is] Bethlehem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/48/

Pamphylia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pam-fil'-i-a (Pamphulia): A country lying along the southern coast of Asia Minor, bounded on the North by Pisidia, on the East by Isauria, on the South by the Mediterranean Sea, and on the West by Lycia (Acts 2:10; 27:5). 1. Physical Features: In the earliest time, Pamphylia was but a narrow strip of low-lying land between the base of the mountains and the sea, scarcely more than 20 miles long and half as wide. A high and imposing range of the Taurus Mountains practically surrounds it upon three sides, and, jutting out into the sea, isolates it from the rest of Asia Minor. Its two rivers, the Cestrus and the Cataractes, are said by ancient writers to have been navigable for several miles inland, but now the greater part of their water is diverted to the fields for irrigating purposes, and the general surface of the country has been constantly changed by the many rapid mountain streams. The level fertile coast land is therefore well watered, and the moist air, which is excessively hot and enervating, has always been laden with fever. Several roads leading from the coast up the steep mountain to the interior existed in ancient times; one of them, called the Kimax or the Ladder, with its broad stair-like steps 2,000 ft. high, may still be seen. Beyond the steps is the high land which was once called "Pisidia," but which the Romans, in 70 AD, made a part of Pamphylia. 2. Importance: Pamphylia, unless in pre-historic times, was never an independent kingdom; it was subject successively to Lydia, Persia, Macedonia, Pergamos and Rome. Because of its comparatively isolated position, civilization...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PAMPHYLIA/

Pamphylia in Naves Topical Bible

(A province in Asia Minor) -Men of, in Jerusalem Ac 2:10 -Paul goes to Ac 13:13,14; 14:24 -John, surnamed "Mark," in Ac 13:13; 15:38 -Sea of Ac 27:5

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PAMPHYLIA/

Pamphylia in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(of every tribe), one of the coast-regions in the south of Asia Minor, having Cilicia on the east and Lycia on the west. In St. Paul's time it was not only a regular province, but the emperor Claudius had united Lycia with it, and probably also a good part of Pisidia. It was in Pamphylia that St. Paul first entered Asia Minor, after preaching the gospel in Cyprus. He and Barnabas sailed up the river Cestrus to Perga. Ac 13:13 The two missionaries finally left Pamphylia by its chief seaport Attalia. Many years afterward St. Paul sailed near the coast. Ac 27:5

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Pamphylia/

Pamphylia in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Paul and his company, loosing from Paphos, sailed north-west and came to Perga, the capital of Pamphylia (Acts 13:13, 14), a province about the middle of the southern sea-board of Asia Minor. It lay between Lycia on the west and Cilicia on the east. There were strangers from Pamphylia at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost (2:10).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Pamphylia/

Pamphylia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Southern province of Asia Minor, bounded on the N. by Pisidia, from which it was separated by the Taurus range, W. by Lycia, E. by Cilicia, S. by the Levant. In Paul's time it with Lycia formed a province under the emperor Claudius. His "peril of robbers" was in crossing Taurus, the Pisidians being notorious for robbery. He visited Pamphylia at his first missionary tour, sailing from Paphos in Cyprus to Perga in Pamphylia on the river Cestrus, where Mark forsook him (Acts 13:13; Acts 15:38). They stayed only a short time then, but on their return front the interior "they preached the word" (Acts 14:24-25). Then they "went down (sea being lower than land) to Attalia," the chief seaport of Pamphylia. The minute accuracy of the geographical order, confirming genuineness, is observable, when, in coasting westward, he is said to "sail over the sea of Cilicia, and Pamphylia." Also Acts 13:13-14, "from Perga to Antioch in Pisidia," and Acts 14:24, "after Pisidia ... to Pamphylia," in returning to the coast from inland.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Pamphylia/

Pamphylia in Hitchcock's Bible Names

a nation made up of every tribe

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Pamphylia/

Pamphylia Scripture - Acts 2:10

Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/2/

Pamphylia Scripture - Acts 13:13

Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Pamphylia Scripture - Acts 15:38

But Paul thought not good to take him with them, who departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/15/

Pamphylia Scripture - Acts 27:5

And when we had sailed over the sea of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra, [a city] of Lycia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/27/

Pamphylia Scripture - Acts 14:24

And after they had passed throughout Pisidia, they came to Pamphylia.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/14/

Paphos in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

pa'-fos: 1. Site: The name of two towns, Old (Palaia Paphos, or Palaipaphos) and New Paphos Nea Paphos), situated at the southwestern extremity of Cyprus. Considerable confusion is caused by the use of the single name Paphos in ancient writers to denote now one, now the other, of these cities. That referred to in Acts 13:6,13 is strictly called New Paphos (modern Baffa), and lay on the coast about a mile South of the modern Ktima and some 10 miles Northwest of the old city. The latter (modern Kouklia) is situated on an eminence more than a mile from the sea, on the left bank of the Diarrizo, probably the ancient Bocarus. 2. History of Old Paphos: It was founded by Cinyras, the father of Adonis, or, according to another legend, by Aerias, and formed the capital of the most important kingdom in Cyprus except that of Salamis. Its territory embraced a considerable portion of Western Cyprus, extending northward to that of Soli, southward to that of Curium and eastward to the range of Troodus. Among its last kings was Nicocles, who ruled shortly after the death of Alexander the Great. In 310 BC Nicocreon of Salamis, who had been set over the whole of Cyprus by Ptolemy I of Egypt, was forced to put an end to his life at Paphos for plotting with Antigonus (Diodorus xx. 21, who wrongly gives the name as Nicocles; see Athenische Mitteilungen, XXII, 203 ff), and from that time Paphos remained under Egyptian rule until the Roman annexation of Cyprus in 58 BC. The growth of New Paphos brought with it the decline of the old city, which was also ruined by successive earthquakes. Yet its temple still retained much of its old fame, and in 69 AD Titus, the future emperor of Rome, turned aside on his journey to Jerusalem, which he was to capture in the following year, to visit the sacred shrine and to inquire of the priests into the fortune which awaited him (Tacitus History ii.2-4; Suetonius Titus 5). 3. History of New Paphos: New Paphos, originally the seaport of the old town, was founded, according to tradition, by Agapenor of Arcadia (Iliad ii.609; Pausan. viii.5, 2). Its possession of a good harbor secured its prosperity, and it had several rich temples. According to Dio Cassius (liv.23) it was restored by Augustus in 15 BC after a destructive earthquake and received the name Augusta (Greek Sebaste). Under the Roman Empire it was the administrative capital of the island and the seat of the governor. The extant remains all date from this period and include those of public buildings, private houses, city walls and the moles of the harbor. 4. The Temple and Cult:...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/P/PAPHOS/

Paphos in Naves Topical Bible

(A city of Cyprus) -Paul blinds a sorcerer in Ac 13:6-13

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/P/PAPHOS/

Paphos in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(boiling, or hot), a town at the west end of Cyprus, connected by a react with Salamis at the east end. It was founded B.C. 1184 (during the period of the judges in Israel). Paul and Barnabas travelled, on their first missionary expedition, "through the isle" from the latter place to the former, Ac 13:6 The great characteristic of Paphos was the worship of Aphrodite or Venus, who was fabled to have here risen from the sea. Her temple, however, was at "Old Paphos" now called Kuklia. The harbor and the chief town were at "New Paphos," ten miles to the northwest. The place is still called Baffa.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/P/Paphos/

Paphos in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the capital of the island of Cyprus, and therefore the residence of the Roman governor. It was visited by Paul and Barnabas on their first missionary tour (Acts 13:6). It is new Paphos which is here meant. It lay on the west coast of the island, about 8 miles north of old Paphos. Its modern name is Baffa.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/P/Paphos/

Paphos in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

A town in the western end of Cyprus, as Salamis was in the E. Paul passed through the isle from Salamis to Paphos (Acts 13:6-13.) Here Barnabas and Saul were instrumental in converting Sergius Paulus the proconsul, in spite of Elymas' opposition. (See ELYMAS.) Saul is here called Paul when "filled with the Holy Spirit" he inflicted blindness from "the hand of the Lord" upon the sorcerer, and thenceforth became more prominent than Barnabas. Here Aphrodite or Venus was said to have risen from the foam of the sea. The harbor and town were at new Paphos, her temple at old Paphos.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/P/Paphos/

Paphos in Hitchcock's Bible Names

which boils

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Paphos/

Paphos Scripture - Acts 13:13

Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/13/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 34:2

And be ready in the morning, and come up in the morning unto mount Sinai, and present thyself there to me in the top of the mount.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/34/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 19:18

And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/19/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 34:29

And it came to pass, when Moses came down from mount Sinai with the two tables of testimony in Moses' hand, when he came down from the mount, that Moses wist not that the skin of his face shone while he talked with him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/34/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 34:4

And he hewed two tables of stone like unto the first; and Moses rose up early in the morning, and went up unto mount Sinai, as the LORD had commanded him, and took in his hand the two tables of stone.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/34/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Numbers 3:4

And Nadab and Abihu died before the LORD, when they offered strange fire before the LORD, in the wilderness of Sinai, and they had no children: and Eleazar and Ithamar ministered in the priest's office in the sight of Aaron their father.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/3/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Judges 5:5

The mountains melted from before the LORD, [even] that Sinai from before the LORD God of Israel.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/5/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 16:1

And they took their journey from Elim, and all the congregation of the children of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin, which [is] between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month after their departing out of the land of Egypt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/16/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 24:16

And the glory of the LORD abode upon mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it six days: and the seventh day he called unto Moses out of the midst of the cloud.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/24/

Mount Sinai Scripture - Exodus 31:18

And he gave unto Moses, when he had made an end of communing with him upon mount Sinai, two tables of testimony, tables of stone, written with the finger of God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Exodus/31/

Mount Zion in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

zi'-on (tsiyon; Sion): 1. Meaning of the Word 2. The Zion of the Jebusites 3. Zion of the Prophets 4. Zion in Later Poetical Writings and Apocrypha 5. Omission of Name by Some Writers 6. The Name "Zion" in Christian Times LITERATURE 1. Meaning of the Word: A name applied to Jerusalem, or to certain parts of it, at least since the time of David. Nothing certain is known of the meaning. Gesenius and others have derived it from a Hebrew root tsahah, "to be dry"; Delitzsch from tsiwwah, "to set up" and Wetzstein from tsin, "to protect." Gesenius finds a more hopeful suggestion in the Arabic equivalent cihw, the Arabic cahwat signifying "ridge of a mountain" or "citadel," which at any rate suitably applies to what we know to have been the original Zion (compare Smith, HGHL, under the word). Considerable confusion has been caused in the past by the want of clear understanding regarding the different sites which have respectively been called "Zion" during the centuries. It will make matters clearer if we take the application of the name: in David's time; in the early Prophets, etc.; in late poetical writings and in the Apocrypha; and in Christian times. 2. The Zion of the Jebusites: Jerus (in the form Uru-sa-lim) is the oldest name we know for this city; it goes back at least 400 years before David. In 2 Sam 5:6-9, "The king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites. .... Nevertheless David took the stronghold of Zion; the same is the city of David .... And David dwelt in the stronghold, and called it the city of David." It is evident that Zion was the name of the citadel of the Jebusite city of Jerusalem. That this citadel and incidentally then city of Jerusalem around it were on the long ridge running South of the Temple (called the southeastern hill in the article JERUSALEM, III, (3) (which see)) is now accepted by almost all modern scholars, mainly on the following grounds: (1) The near proximity of the site to the only known spring, now the "Virgin's Fount," once called GIHON (which see). From our knowledge of other ancient sites all over Israel, as well as on grounds of common-sense, it is hardly possible to believe that the early inhabitants of this site with such an abundant source at their very doors could have made any other spot their headquarters. (2) The suitability of the site for defense.--The sites suited for settlement in early Canaanite times were all, if we may judge from a number of them now known, of this nature--a rocky spur isolated on three sides by steep valleys, and, in many sites, protected at the end where they join the main mountain ridge by either a valley or a rocky spur. (3) The size of the ridge, though very small to our modern ideas, is far more...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/Z/ZION/

Mount Zion in Naves Topical Bible

(A stronghold of Jerusalem) -Also called SION -Captured from the Jebusites by David 2Sa 5:6-9; 1Ch 11:5-7 -Called thereafter "the city of David," 2Sa 5:7,9; 6:12,16; 1Ki 8:1; 1Ch 11:5,7; 15:1,29; 2Ch 5:2 -The ark of the covenant Placed in 2Sa 6:12,16; 1Ki 8:1; 1Ch 15:1,29; 2Ch 5:2 Removed from, to Solomon's temple on Mount Moriah 1Ki 8:1; 2Ch 5:2; with 3:1 -Collectively, the place, the forms, and the assemblies of Israelite worship 2Ki 19:21,31; Ps 9:11; 48:2,11,12; 74:2; 132:13; 137:1; Isa 35:10; 40:9; 49:14; 51:16; 52:1,2,7,8; 60:14; 62:1,11; Jer 31:6; 50:5; La 1:4; Joe 2:1,15; Mt 21:5; Joh 12:15; Ro 9:33; 11:26; 1Pe 2:6 -Name of, applied to Jerusalem Ps 87:2,5; 149:2; So 3:11; Isa 33:14,20; Jer 9:19; 30:17; Zec 9:13 -Called the city of God Ps 87:2,3; Isa 60:14 -Restoration of, promised Isa 51:3,11,16; 52:1,2,7,8; 59:20; 60:14; Ob 1:17- 21; Zep 3:14,16; Zec 1:14,17; 2:7,10; 8:2,3; 9:9,13 -Name of, applied to the city of the redeemed Heb 12:22; Re 14:1

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/Z/ZION/

Mount Zion in Smiths Bible Dictionary

[JERUSALEM]

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/Z/Zion/

Mount Zion in Easton's Bible Dictionary

sunny; height, one of the eminences on which Jerusalem was built. It was surrounded on all sides, except the north, by deep valleys, that of the Tyropoeon (q.v.) separating it from Moriah (q.v.), which it surpasses in height by 105 feet. It was the south-eastern hill of Jerusalem. When David took it from the Jebusites (Josh. 15:63; 2 Sam. 5:7) he built on it a citadel and a palace, and it became "the city of David" (1 Kings 8:1; 2 Kings 19:21, 31; 1 Chr. 11:5). In the later books of the Old Testament this name was sometimes used (Ps. 87:2; 149:2; Isa. 33:14; Joel 2:1) to denote Jerusalem in general, and sometimes God's chosen Israel (Ps. 51:18; 87:5). In the New Testament (see SION -T0003448) it is used sometimes to denote the Church of God (Heb. 12:22), and sometimes the heavenly city (Rev. 14:1).

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/Z/Zion/

Mount Zion in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

(See JERUSALEM.) Lieut. Conder (Israel Exploration Quarterly Statement, Oct. 1877, p. 178) takes Zion for a district name, like "Mount Ephraim." It means sunny mountain. Hezekiah brought his aqueduct (2 Chronicles 22:30; 2 Chronicles 33:14) from Gihon, the Virgin's fountain, to the western side of the city of David (which is thus Ophel). Zion was the city of David (2 Samuel 5:9; 1 Chronicles 11:7; 1 Chronicles 11:2 Chronicles 5); even the temple was sometimes said to be on Zion (1 Maccabees 4:5:2); so was Millo (2 Chronicles 32:36-39). The name thus appears to have had a somewhat wide application; but it mainly applies to the eastern of the two main hills on which Jerusalem latterly was built. W. F. Birch (Israel Exploration Quarterly Statement, July 1878, p. 129) remarks that ancient Jerusalem stood on a rocky plateau enclosed on three sides by two ravines, the king's dale on the W. and S., the brook Kedron on the E. Another ravine, the valley of Hinnom, cleft the space thus enclosed. Between the "brook" and "valley" was the ridge on the southern end of which stood at the beginning of David's reign the hereto impregnable fortress of Jebus (afterward called Zion). In the valley W. of the ridge lay the rest of the city, once captured by the Israelites, but now occupied by the Jebusites. On its eastern side near the" brook" was an intermittent fountain, called then Enrogel, once Gihon in the "brook," afterward Siloah, now the fountain of the Virgin. The inducement to build on the southern part of this ridge rather than on the northern part, or on the higher hill on the W., was the water supply from the fountain at its base. Moreover some Hittite, Amorite, or Melchizedek himself, engineered a subterranean watercourse extending from the fountain for 70 ft., and then by a vertical rock- cut shaft ascending 50 ft. into the heart of the city, so that in a siege the inhabitants might have a supply of water without risk to themselves, and without the knowledge of the besiegers. So secure did the Jebusites seem, that they defied David, as if "the lame and the blind" would suffice to defend the fortress (2 Samuel 5:6). David promised that whoever should first get up the tsinor , "gutter," as the subterranean aqueduct was called, should be commander in chief. Joab ventured and won. How David heard of the secret passage, and how Joab accomplished the feat, is not recorded; but Capt. Warren (3000 years subsequently) found the ascent of the tsinor so hard (Jerusalem Recovered, p. 244-247) that the conviction is forced on one that Joab, who was as cunning as he was valiant, must have had some accomplice among the Jebusites to help him in his perilous enterprise, just as occurred at Jericho and at Bethel (Joshua 2; Judges 2:22-26). In subsequent years Araunah, a Jebusite of rank, owned the threshing area and lands just outside the city of David, and sold them at an enormous price to David for an altar and site of the temple. If he was the traitor to the Jebusites, by whose help Joab entered the city, we can understand the otherwise strange fact that he was left in possession of such valuable property in such a situation (2 Samuel 24:18-24). Josephus' testimony rather favors this conjecture (Ant. J. 7:3, Section 1-3): "Araunah was a wealthy man among the Jebusites, but was not slain by David in the siege because of the goodwill he bore to the Hebrew, and a particular benignity and affection which he had to the king himself" (Ant. J. 7:13, Section 4). "He was by his lineage a Jebusite, but a particular friend of David, and for that cause it was that when he overthrew the city he did him no harm." (See TEMPLE .)

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/Z/Zion/

Zion in Hitchcock's Bible Names

monument; raised up; sepulcher

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/Z/Zion/

Mount Zion Scripture - Isaiah 29:8

It shall even be as when an hungry [man] dreameth, and, behold, he eateth; but he awaketh, and his soul is empty: or as when a thirsty man dreameth, and, behold, he drinketh; but he awaketh, and, behold, [he is] faint, and his soul hath appetite: so shall the multitude of all the nations be, that fight against mount Zion.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/29/

Mount Zion Scripture - Isaiah 18:7

In that time shall the present be brought unto the LORD of hosts of a people scattered and peeled, and from a people terrible from their beginning hitherto; a nation meted out and trodden under foot, whose land the rivers have spoiled, to the place of the name of the LORD of hosts, the mount Zion.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/18/

Mount Zion Scripture - Psalms 74:2

Remember thy congregation, [which] thou hast purchased of old; the rod of thine inheritance, [which] thou hast redeemed; this mount Zion, wherein thou hast dwelt.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Psalms/74/

Mount Zion Scripture - Isaiah 31:4

For thus hath the LORD spoken unto me, Like as the lion and the young lion roaring on his prey, when a multitude of shepherds is called forth against him, [he] will not be afraid of their voice, nor abase himself for the noise of them: so shall the LORD of hosts come down to fight for mount Zion, and for the hill thereof.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/31/

Mount Zion Scripture - Joel 2:32

And it shall come to pass, [that] whosoever shall call on the name of the LORD shall be delivered: for in mount Zion and in Jerusalem shall be deliverance, as the LORD hath said, and in the remnant whom the LORD shall call.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Joel/2/

Nain in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

na'-in (Navi): This town is mentioned in Scripture only in connection with the visit of Jesus and the miracle of raising the widow's son from the dead (Lk 7:11). The name persists to this day, and in the form of Nein clings to a small village on the northwestern slope of Jebel ed-Duchy ("Hill of Moreh"), the mountain which, since the Middle Ages, has been known as Little Hermon. The modern name of the mountain is derived from Neby Duchy whose wely crowns the height above the village. There are many ancient remains, proving that the place was once of considerable size. It was never enclosed by a wall, as some have thought from the mention of "the gate." This was probably the opening between the houses by which the road entered the town. Tristram thought he had found traces of an ancient city wall, but this proved to be incorrect. The ancient town perhaps stood somewhat higher on the hill than the present village. In the rocks to the East are many tombs of antiquity. The site commands a beautiful and extensive view across the plain to Carmel, over the Nazareth hills, and away past Tabor to where the white peak of Hermon glistens in the sun. To the South are the heights of Gilboa and the uplands of Samaria. The village, once prosperous, has fallen on evil days. It is said that the villagers received such good prices for simsum that they cultivated it on a large scale. A sudden drop in the price brought them to ruin, from which, after many years, they have not yet fully recovered.

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NAIN/

Nain in Naves Topical Bible

(A city in Galilee) -Jesus restores to life a widow's son in Lu 7:11

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NAIN/

Nain in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(beauty), a village of Galilee, the gate of which is made illustrious by the raising of the widow's son. Lu 7:12 The modern Nein is situated on the northwestern edge of the "Little Hermon," or Jebel-ed-Duhy, where the ground falls into the plain of Esdraelon. The entrance to the place, where our Saviour met the funeral, must probably always have seen up the steep ascent from the plain; and here on the west side of the village, the rock is full of sepulchral caves.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/N/Nain/

Nain in Easton's Bible Dictionary

(from Heb. nain, "green pastures," "lovely"), the name of a town near the gate of which Jesus raised to life a widow's son (Luke 7:11-17). It is identified with the village called Nein, standing on the north-western slope of Jebel ed-Duhy (=the "hill Moreh" = "Little hermon"), about 4 miles from Tabor and 25 southwest of Capernaum. At the foot of the slope on which it stands is the great plain of Esdraelon. This was the first miracle of raising the dead our Lord had wrought, and it excited great awe and astonishment among the people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/N/Nain/

Nain in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

The scene of Christ's raising the widow's son (Luke 7:12). Now Nein on N.W. verge of jebel ed Duhy (Little Hermon) where it slopes down to Esdraelon plain. The rock W. of the village abounds in cave tombs, also in the E. side. Eighteen miles from Capernaum, where Jesus had been the preceding day. Josephus (Ant. 20:5, section 1) notices Nain as on the way from Galilee to Jerusalem, the very way Jesus was going

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/N/Nain/

Nain in Hitchcock's Bible Names

beauty; pleasantness

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/N/Nain/

Nain Scripture - Luke 7:11

And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/7/

Nazareth in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

naz'-a-reth (Nazaret, Nazareth, and other forms): 1. Notice Confined to the New Testament: A town in Galilee, the home of Joseph. and the Virgin Mary, and for about 30 years the scene of the Saviour's life (Mt 2:23; Mk 1:9; Lk 2:39,51; 4:16, etc.). He was therefore called Jesus of Nazareth, although His birthplace was Bethlehem; and those who became His disciples were known as Nazarenes. This is the name, with slight modification, used to this day by Moslems for Christians, Nacara--the singular being Nacrany. The town is not named in the Old Testament, although the presence of a spring and the convenience of the site make it probable that the place was occupied in old times. Quaresimus learned that the ancient name was Medina Abiat, in which we may recognize the Arabic el-Medinat el-baidtah, "the white town." Built of the white stone supplied by the limestone rocks around, the description is quite accurate. There is a reference in Mishna (Menachoth viii.6) to the "white house of the hill" whence wine for the drink offering was brought. An elegy for the 9th of Abib speaks of a "course" of priests settled in Nazareth. This, however, is based upon an ancient midhrash now lost (Neubauer, Geogr. du Talmud, 82, 85, 190; Delitzsch, Ein Tag in Capernaum, 142). But all this leaves us still in a state of uncertainty. 2. Position and Physical Features: The ancient town is represented by the modern en-Nacirah, which is built mainly on the western and northwestern slopes of a hollow among the lower hills of Galilee, just before they sink into the plain of Esdraelon. It lies about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean at Haifa. The road to the plain and the coast goes over the southwestern lip of the hollow; that to Tiberias and Damascus over the heights to the Northeast. A rocky gorge breaks down southward, issuing on the plain between two craggy hills. That to the West is the traditional Hill of Precipitation (Lk 4:29). This, however, is too far from the city as it must have been in the days of Christ. It is probable that the present town occupies pretty nearly the ancient site; and the scene of that attempt on Jesus' life may have been the cliff, many feet in height, not far from the old synagogue, traces of which are still seen in the western part of the town. There is a good spring under the Greek Orthodox church at the foot of the hill on the North. The water is led in a conduit to the fountain, whither the women and their children go as in old times, to carry home in their jars supplies for domestic use. There is also a tiny spring in the face of the western hill. To the Northwest rises the height on which stands the sanctuary, now in ruins, of Neby Sa`in. From this point a most beautiful and extensive view is obtained, ranging on a clear day from the Mediterranean on the West to the Mountain of Bashan on the East; from Upper Galilee and Mt. Hermon on the North to the uplands of Gilead and Samaria on the South The whole extent of Esdraelon is seen, that great battlefield, associated with so many heroic exploits in Israel's history, from Carmel and Megiddo to Tabor...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NAZARETH/

Nazareth in Naves Topical Bible

A village in Galilee -Joseph and Mary live at Mt 2:23; Lu 1:26,27,56; 2:4,39,51 -Jesus from Mt 21:11; Mr 1:24; 10:47; Lu 4:34; 18:37; 24:19 -People of, reject Jesus Lu 4:16-30 -Its reputation Joh 1:46

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NAZARETH/

Nazareth in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(the guarded one) the ordinary residence of our Saviour, is not mentioned in the Old Testament, but occurs first in Mt 2:23 It derives its celebrity from its connection with the history of Christ, and in that respect has a hold on the imagination and feelings of men which it shares only with Jerusalem and Bethlehem. It is situated among the hills which constitute the south ridges of Lebanon,just before they sink down into the plain of Esdraelon, (Mr. Merrill, in "Galilee in the Time of Christ" (1881), represents Nazareth in Christ's time as a city (so always called in the New Testament) of 15,000 to 20,000 inhabitants, of some importance and considerable antiquity, and not so insignificant and mean as has been represented. --ED.) Of the identification of the ancient site there can be no doubt. The name of the present village is en-Nazirah the same, therefore, as of old it is formed on a hill or mountain, Lu 4:29 it is within the limits of the province of Galilee, Mr 1:9 it is near Cana, according to the implication in Joh 2:1,2,11 a precipice exists in the neighborhood. Lu 4:29 The modern Nazareth belongs to the better class of eastern villages. It has a population of 3000 or 4000; a few are Mohammadans, the rest Latin and Greek Christians. (Near this town Napoleon once encamped (1799), after the battle of Mount Tabor.) The origin of the disrepute in which Nazareth stood, Joh 1:47 is not certainly known. All the inhabitants of Galilee were looked upon with contempt by the people of Judea because they spoke a ruder dialect, were less cultivated and were more exposed by their position to contact with the heathen. But Nazareth labored under a special opprobrium, for it was a Galilean and not a southern Jew who asked the reproachful question whether "any good thing" could come from that source. Above the town are several rocky ledges, over which a person could not be thrown without almost certain destruction. There is one very remarkable precipice, almost perpendicular and forty or fifty near the Maronite church, which may well be supposed to be the identical one over which his infuriated fellow townsmen attempted to hurl Jesus.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/N/Nazareth/

Nazareth in Easton's Bible Dictionary

separated, generally supposed to be the Greek form of the Hebrew _netser_, a "shoot" or "sprout." Some, however, think that the name of the city must be connected with the name of the hill behind it, from which one of the finest prospects in Israel is obtained, and accordingly they derive it from the Hebrew _notserah_, i.e., one guarding or watching, thus designating the hill which overlooks and thus guards an extensive region. This city is not mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the home of Joseph and Mary (Luke 2:39), and here the angel announced to the Virgin the birth of the Messiah (1:26-28). Here Jesus grew up from his infancy to manhood (4:16); and here he began his public ministry in the synagogue (Matt. 13:54), at which the people were so offended that they sought to cast him down from the precipice whereon their city was built (Luke 4:29). Twice they expelled him from their borders (4:16-29; Matt. 13:54-58); and he finally retired from the city, where he did not many mighty works because of their unbelief (Matt. 13:58), and took up his residence in Capernaum. Nazareth is situated among the southern ridges of Lebanon, on the steep slope of a hill, about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee and about 6 west from Mount Tabor. It is identified with the modern village en-Nazirah, of six or ten thousand inhabitants. It lies "as in a hollow cup" lower down upon the hill than the ancient city. The main road for traffic between Egypt and the interior of Asia passed by Nazareth near the foot of Tabor, and thence northward to Damascus. It is supposed from the words of Nathanael in John 1:46 that the city of Nazareth was held in great disrepute, either because, it is said, the people of Galilee were a rude and less cultivated class, and were largely influenced by the Gentiles who mingled with them, or because of their...

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/N/Nazareth/

Nazareth in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

In a basin among hills descending into Esdraelon from Lebanon, and forming a valley which runs in a wavy line E. and W. On the northern side of the valley the rounded limestone hills rise to 400 or 500 ft. The valley and hill sides abound in gay flowers as the hollyhock growing wild, fig trees, olives, and oranges, gardens with cactus hedges, and grainfields. Now en Nazirah on a hill of Galilee (Mark 1:9), with a precipice nigh (Luke 4:29); near Cane (John 2:1-2; John 2:11). Its population of 4,000 is partly Muslim, but mainly of Latin and Greek Christians. It has a mosque, a Maronite, a Greek, and a Protestant church, and a large Franciscan convent. The rain pouring down the hills would sweep away a house founded on the surface, and often leaves the streets impassable with mud. So the houses generally are of stone, founded, after digging deep, upon the rock (Luke 6:47). On a hill behind is the tomb of neby Ismail, commanding one of the most lovely prospects in the world, Lebanon and snowy Hermon on the N., Carmel and the Mediterranean and Acca on the W., Gilead and Tabor on the S.E., the Esdraelon plain and the Samaria mountains on the S., and villages on every side; Cana, Nain, Endor, Jezreel (Zerin), etc. Doubtless in early life Jesus often stood on this spot and held communion with His Father who, by His Son, had created this glorious scene. Nazareth is never named in Old Testament. It was there Gabriel was sent from God to announce to the Virgin her coming conception of Him who shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever, and of whose kingdom there shall be no end (Luke 1:26-33). After His birth and the sojourn in Egypt Joseph and Mary took the child to their original home in Nazareth, six miles W. of Mount Tabor (Matthew 2:23; Luke 2:39; Luke 4:16). As "John the Baptist; was in the desert until the day of his showing unto Israel," so Messiah was growing up unknown to the world in the sequestered town among the mountains, until His baptism by the forerunner ushered in His public ministry. As Jews alone lived in Nazareth from before Josephus' time to the reign of Constantine (Epiphanius, Haer.), it is impossible to identify the sacred sites as tradition pretends to do, namely, the place of the annunciation to Mary, with the inscription on the pavement of the grotto, "Hic Verbum caro factum est", the mensa Christi, and the synagogue...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/N/Nazareth/

Nazareth in Hitchcock's Bible Names

separated; crowned; sanctified

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/N/Nazareth/

Nazareth Scripture - Mark 1:24

Saying, Let [us] alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/1/

Nazareth Scripture - Luke 4:34

Saying, Let [us] alone; what have we to do with thee, [thou] Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art; the Holy One of God.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/4/

Nazareth Scripture - Luke 2:4

And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/2/

Nazareth Scripture - Acts 22:8

And I answered, Who art thou, Lord? And he said unto me, I am Jesus of Nazareth, whom thou persecutest.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/22/

Nazareth Scripture - Mark 10:47

And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out, and say, Jesus, [thou] Son of David, have mercy on me.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/10/

Nazareth Scripture - John 18:5

They answered him, Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus saith unto them, I am [he]. And Judas also, which betrayed him, stood with them.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/18/

Nazareth Scripture - Matthew 2:23

And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/2/

Nazareth Scripture - John 1:45

Philip findeth Nathanael, and saith unto him, We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/John/1/

Nazareth Scripture - Mark 16:6

And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/16/

Nazareth Scripture - Acts 2:22

Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Acts/2/

Negeb in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

neg'-eb (ha-neghebh, "the negeb" or simply, neghebh, from a root meaning "to be dry," and therefore in the first instance implying the "dry" or "parched regions," hence, in the Septuagint it is usually translated eremos, "desert," also nageb): 1. Meaning: As the Negeb lay to the South of Judah, the word came to be used in the sense of "the South," and is so used in a few passages (e.g. Gen 13:14) and in such is translated lips (see GEOGRAPHY). The English translation is unsuitable in several passages, and likely to lead to confusion. For example, in Gen 13:1 Abram is represented as going "into the South" when journeying northward from Egypt toward Bethel; in Nu 13:22 the spies coming from the "wilderness of Zin" toward Hebron are described as coming "by the South," although they were going north. The difficulty in these and many other passages is at once obviated if it is recognized that the Negeb was a geographical term for a definite geographical region, just as Shephelah, literally, "lowland," was the name of another district of Israel. In the Revised Version (British and American) "Negeb" is given in margin, but it would make for clearness if it were restored to the text. 2. Description: This "parched" land is generally considered as beginning South of edition Dahariyeb--the probable site of DEBIR (which see)--and as stretching South in a series of rolling hills running in a general direction of East to West until the actual wilderness begins, a distance of perhaps 70 miles (see NATURAL FEATURES). To the East it is bounded by the Dead Sea and the southern Ghor, and to the West there is no defined boundary before the Mediterranean. It is a land of sparse and scanty springs and small rainfall; in the character of its soil it is a transition from the fertility of Canaan to the wilderness of the desert; it is essentially a pastoral land, where grazing is plentiful in the early months and where camels and goats can sustain life, even through the long summer drought. Today, as through most periods of history, it is a land for the nomad rather than the settled inhabitant, although abundant ruins in many spots testify to better physical conditions at some periods (see I, 5, below). The direction of the valleys East or West, the general dryness, and the character of the inhabitants have always made it a more or less isolated region without thoroughfare. The great routes pass along the coast to the West or up the Arabah to the East. It formed an additional barrier...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NEGEB/

Nile River in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

nil (Neilos, meaning not certainly known; perhaps refers to the color of the water, as black or blue. This name does not occur in the Hebrew of the Old Testament or in the English translation): I. THE NILE IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 1. Description 2. Geological Origin 3. The Making of Egypt 4. The Inundation 5. The Infiltration II. THE NILE IN HISTORY 1. The Location of Temples 2. The Location of Cemeteries 3. The Damming of the Nile 4. Egyptian Famines III. THE NILE IN RELIGION 1. The Nile as a God 2. The Nile in the Osirian Myth 3. The Celestial Nile A river of North Africa, the great river of Egypt. The name employed in the Old Testament to designate the Nile is in the Hebrew ye'or, Egyptian aur, earlier, atur, usually translated "river," also occasionally "canals" (Ps 78:44; Ezek 29:3 ff). In a general way it means all the water of Egypt. The Nile is also the principal river included in the phrase nahare kush, "rivers of Ethiopia" (Isa 18:1). Poetically the Nile is called yam, "sea" (Job 41:31; Nah 3:8; probably Isa 18:2), but this is not a name of the river. shichor, not always written fully, has also been interpreted in a mistaken way of the Nile (see SHIHOR). Likewise nahar mitsrayim, "brook of Egypt," a border stream in no way connected with the Nile, has sometimes been mistaken for that river. See RIVER OF EGYPT. I. The Nile in Physical Geography. 1. Description: The Nile is formed by the junction of the White Nile and the Blue Nile in latitude 15 degree 45' North and longitude 32 degree 45' East. The Blue Nile rises in the highlands of Abyssinia, latitude 12 degree 30' North, long. 35 degree East, and flows Northwest 850 miles to its junction with the White North. The White Nile, the principal branch of the North, rises in Victoria Nyanza, a great lake in Central Africa, a few miles North of the equator, long. 33 degree East (more exactly the Nile may be said to rise at the headwaters of the Ragera River, a small stream on the other side of the lake, 3 degree South of the equator), and flows North in a tortuous channel, 1,400 miles to its junction with the Blue Nile. From this junction-point the Niles flows North through Nubia and Egypt 1,900 miles and empties into the Mediterranean Sea, in latitude 32 degree North, through 2 mouths, the Rosetta, East of Alexandria, and the Damietta, West of Port Said. There were formerly 7 mouths scattered along a coast-line of 140 miles. 2. Geological Origin: The Nile originated...

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Nile River in Naves Topical Bible

Called THE RIVER Isa 11:15; 19:5-10; Eze 29:4; Am 8:8 -Called SIHOR Isa 23:3; Jer 2:18

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NILE/

Nile River in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(blue, dark), the great river of Egypt. The word Nile nowhere occurs in the Authorized Version but it is spoken of under the names of Sihor [SIHOR] and the "river of Egypt." Ge 15:18 We cannot as yet determine the length of the Nile, although recent discoveries have narrowed the question. There is scarcely a doubt that its largest confluent is fed by the great lakes on and south of the equator. It has been traced upward for about 2700 miles, measured by its course, not in a direct line, and its extent is probably over 1000 miles more. (The course of the river has been traced for 3300 miles. For the first 1800 miles (McClintock and Strong say 2300) from its mouth it receives no tributary; but at Kartoom, the capital of Nubia, is the junction of the two great branches, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, so called from the color of the clay which tinges their waters. The Blue Nile rises in the mountains of Abyssinia and is the chief source of the deposit which the Nile brings to Egypt. The White Nile is the larger branch. Late travellers have found its source in Lake Victoria Nyanza, three degrees south of the equator. From this lake to the mouth of the Nile the distance is 2300 miles in a straight line --one eleventh the circumference of the globe. From the First Cataract, at Syene, the river flows smoothly at the rate of two or three miles an hour with a width of half a mile. to Cairo. A little north of Cairo it divides into two branches, one flowing to Rosetta and the other to Damietta, from which place the mouths are named. See Bartlett's "Egypt and Israel," 1879. The great peculiarity of the river is its annual overflow, caused by the periodical tropical rains. "With wonderful clock-like regularity the river begins to swell about the end of June, rises 24 feet at Cairo between the 20th and 30th of September and falls as much by the middle of May. Six feet higher than this is devastation; six feet lower is destitution." --Bartlett. So that the Nile increases...

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Nile River in Easton's Bible Dictionary

dark; blue, not found in Scripture, but frequently referred to in the Old Testament under the name of Sihor, i.e., "the black stream" (Isa. 23:3; Jer. 2:18) or simply "the river" (Gen. 41:1; Ex. 1:22, etc.) and the "flood of Egypt" (Amos 8:8). It consists of two rivers, the White Nile, which takes its rise in the Victoria Nyanza, and the Blue Nile, which rises in the Abyssinian Mountains. These unite at the town of Khartoum, whence it pursues its course for 1,800 miles, and falls into the Mediterranean through its two branches, into which it is divided a few miles north of Cairo, the Rosetta and the Damietta branch. (See EGYPT -T0001137.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/N/Nile/

Nile River in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Not so named in the Bible; related to Sanskrit Nilah, "blue." The Nile has two names: the sacred name Hapi, or Hapi-mu, "the abyss of waters," Hp-ro-mu, "the waters whose source is hidden"; and the common name Yeor Aor, Aur (Atur): both Egyptian names. Shihor, "the black river," is its other Bible name, Greek Melas or Kmelas, Latin Melo, darkened by the fertilizing soil which it deposits at its overflow (Jeremiah 2:18). The hieroglyphic name of Egypt is Kam, "black." Egyptians distinguished between Hapi-res, the "southern Nile" of Upper Egypt, and Hapi-meheet, the "northern Nile" of Lower Egypt. Hapi-ur, "the high Nile," fertilizes the land; the Nile low brought famine. The Nile god is painted red to represent the inundation, but blue at other times. An impersonation of Noah (Osburn). Famine and plenty are truly represented as coming up out of the river in Pharaoh's dream (Genesis 41). Therefore they worshipped it, and the plague on its waters, was a judgment on that idolatry (Exodus 7:21; Psalm 105:29). (See EGYPT; EXODUS.) The rise begins at the summer solstice; the flood is two months later, after the autumnal equinox, at its height pouring through cuttings in the banks which are higher than the rest of the soil and covering the valley, and lasting three months. (Amos 8:8; Amos 9:5; Isaiah 23:3). The appointed S.W. bound of Israel (Joshua 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:5; 2 Chronicles 9:26; Genesis 15:18). 1 Kings 8:65 "stream" (nachal, not "river".) Its confluent is still called the Blue river; so Nilah means "darkblue," or "black." The plural "rivers" is used for the different mouths, branches, and canals of the Nile. The tributaries are further up than Egypt (Psalm 78:44; Exodus 7:18-20; Isaiah 7:18; Isaiah 19:6; Ezekiel 29:3; Ezekiel 30:12). "The stream (nachal) of Egypt" seems distinct (Isaiah 27:12), now "wady el Arish" (where was the frontier city Rhino-corura) on the confines of Israel and Egypt (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47, where for "river" should stand "stream," nachal)). Smith's Bible Dictionary suggests that nachal) is related to the Nile and is that river; but the distinctness with which nachal) is mentioned, and not as elsewhere Sihor, or "river," Ye'or, forbids the identification. "The rivers of Ethiopia" (Isaiah 18:1-2), Cush, are the Atbara, the Astapus or Blue river, between which two rivers Meroe (the Ethiopia meant in Isaiah 18) lies, and the Astaboras or White Nile; these rivers conjoin in the one Nile, and wash down the soil along their banks from Upper Egypt, and deposit it on Lower Egypt; compare "whose land (Upper Egypt) the rivers have spoiled" or "cut up" or "divided." The Nile is called "the sea" (Isaiah 19:5), for it looks a sea at the overflow; the Egyptians still call it El Bahr "the sea" (Nahum 3:8). Its length measured by its course is probably 3,700 miles, the longest in the world. Its bed is cut through layers of nummulitic limestone (of which the pyramids of Ghizeh are built, full of nummulites, which the Arabs call "Pharaoh's beans"), sandstone under that, breccia verde under that, azoic rocks still lower, with red granite and syenite rising through all the upper strata...

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Nineveh in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

nin'-e-ve (nineweh; Nineue, Nineui; Greek and Roman writers, Ninos): I. BEGINNINGS, NAME, POSITION 1. First Biblical Mention 2. Etymology of the Name 3. Position on the Tigris II. NINEVEH AND ITS SURROUNDINGS 1. Its Walls 2. Principal Mounds and Gateways 3. Extent and Population within the Walls 4. Extent outside the Walls 5. Calah, Resen and Rehoboth-Ir 6. Khorsabad 7. Sherif Khan and Selamieh 8. Nimroud III. PALACES AT NINEVEH PROPER 1. The Palace of Sennacherib 2. The Palace of Assur-bani-apli IV. SENNACHERIB'S DESCRIPTION OF NINEVEH 1. The Walls 2. The Gates--Northwest 3. The Gates--South and East 4. The Gates--West 5. The Outer Wall: the Plantations 6. The Water-Supply, etc. 7. How the Bas-Reliefs Illustrate the King's Description 8. Nineveh the Later Capital V. LAST DAYS AND FALL OF NINEVEH LITERATURE I. Beginnings, Name, Position. 1. First Biblical Mention: The first Biblical mention of Nineveh is in Gen 10:11, where it is stated that NIMROD (which see) or Asshur went out into Assyria, and builded Nineveh and Rehoboth-Ir, and Calah, and Resen between Nineveh and Calah, with the addition, "the same is the great city." Everything indicates that these statements are correct, for Nineveh was certainly at one time under Babylonian rule, and was at first not governed by Assyrian kings, but by issake or viceroys of Assur, the old capital. To all appearance Nineveh took its name from the Babylonian Nina near Lagas in South Babylonia, on the Euphrates, from which early foundation it was probably colonized. The native name appears as Ninua or Nina (Ninaa), written with the character for "water enclosure" with that for "fish" inside, implying a connection between Nina and the Semitic nun, "fish." 2. Etymology of the Name: The Babylonian Nina was a place where fish were very abundant, and Ishtar or Nina, the goddess of the city, was associated with Nin-mah, Merodach's spouse, as goddess of reproduction. Fish are also plentiful in the Tigris at Mosul, the modern town on the other side of the river, and this may have influenced the choice of the site by the Babylonian settlers, and the foundation there of the great temple of Ishtar or Nina. The date of this foundation is unknown, but it may have taken place about 3OOO BC. 3. Position on the Tigris: Nineveh lay on the eastern bank of the Tigris, at the point where the Khosr falls into that stream. The outline of the wall is rectangular on the West, but of an irregular shape on the East. The western fortifications run from Northwest to Southeast, following, roughly, the course of the river, which now flows about 1,500 yards from the walls, instead of close to them, as in ancient times. II. Nineveh and Its Surroundings. According to the late G. Smith, the southwestern wall has a length of about 2 1/2 miles, and is joined at its western corner by the northwestern wall, which runs in a northeasterly direction for about 1 1/3 miles. 1. Its Walls: The northeastern wall, starting here, runs at first in a southeasterly direction, but turns southward, gradually approaching the southwestern wall, to which, at the end of about 3 1/4 miles, it is joined by a short wall, facing nearly South, rather more than half a mile long. 2. Principal Mounds and Gateways: The principal mounds are Kouyunjik, a little Northeast of the village of `Amusiyeh, and Nebi-Yunas, about 1,500 yards to the Southeast. Both of these lie just within the Southwest wall. Extensive remains of buildings occupy the fortified area. Numerous openings occur in the walls, many of them ancient, though some seem to have been made after the abandonment of the site. The principal gate on the Northwest was guarded by winged bulls (see Layard, Monuments of Nineveh, 2nd series, plural 3; Nineveh and Babylon, 120). Other gates gave access to the various commercial roads of the country, those on the East passing through the curved outworks and the double line of fortifications which protected the northeastern wall from attack on that side, where the Ninevites evidently considered that they had most to fear. 3. Extent and Population within the Walls: According to G. Smith, the circuit of the inner wall is about 8 miles, and Captain Jones, who made a trigonometrical survey in 1854, estimated that, allotting to each inhabitant 50 square yards, the city may have contained...

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Nineveh in Naves Topical Bible

Capitol of the Assyrian Empire Ge 10:11,12 -Contained a population of upwards of one-hundred and twenty thousand people, when Jonah preached Jon 4:11 -Extent of Jon 3:4 -Sennacherib in 2Ki 19:36,37; Isa 37:37,38 -Jonah preaches to Jon 1:1,2; 3 -Nahum prophesies against Na 1; 2; 3 -Zephaniah foretells the desolation of Zep 2:13-15

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NINEVEH/

Nineveh in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(abode of Ninus), the capital of the ancient kingdom and empire of Assyria. The name appears to be compounded from that of an Assyrian deity "Nin," corresponding, it is conjectured, with the Greek Hercules, and occurring in the names of several Assyrian kings, as in "Ninus," the mythic founder, according to Greek tradition of the city. Nineveh is situated on the eastern bank of the river Tigris, 50 miles from its mouth and 250 miles north of Babylon. It is first mentioned in the Old Testament in connection with the primitive dispersement and migrations of the human race. Asshur, or according to the marginal reading, which is generally preferred, Nimrod is there described, Ge 10:11 as extending his kingdom from the land of Shinar or Babylonia, in the south, to Assyria in the north and founding four cities, of which the most famous was Nineveh. Hence Assyria was subsequently known to the Jews as "the land of Nimrod," cf. Mic 5:6 and was believed to have been first peopled by a colony from Babylon. The kingdom of Assyria and of the Assyrians is referred to in the Old Testament as connected with the Jews at a very early period, as in Nu 24:22,24 and Psal 83:8 but after the notice of the foundation of Nineveh in Genesis no further mention is made of the city until the time of the book of Jonah, or the eighth century B.C. In this book no mention is made of Assyria or the Assyrians, the king to whom the prophet was sent being termed the "king of Nineveh," and his subjects "the people of Nineveh." Assyria is first called a kingdom in the time of Menahem, about B.C. 770. Nahum (? B.C. 645) directs his prophecies against Nineveh; only once against the king of Assyria. ch. Na 3:18 In 2Ki 19:36 and Isai 37:37 the city is first distinctly mentioned as the residence of the monarch. Sennacherib was slain there when worshipping in the temple of Nisroch his god. Zephaniah, about B.C. 630, couples the capital and the kingdom together, Zep 2:13 and this is the last mention of Nineveh as an existing city. The destruction of Nineveh occurred B.C. 606. The city was then laid waste, its monuments destroyed and its inhabitants scattered or carried away into captivity. It never rose again from its ruins. This total disappearance of Nineveh is fully confirmed by the records of profane history. The political history of Nineveh is that of Assyria, of which a sketch has already been given. [ASSYRIA] Previous to recent excavations and researches, the ruins which occupied the presumed site of Nineveh seemed to consist of mere shapeless heaps or mounds of earth and rubbish. Unlike the vast masses of brick masonry which mark the site of Babylon, they showed externally no signs of artificial construction, except perhaps here and there the traces of a rude wall of sun-dried bricks. Some of these mounds were of enormous dimensions, looking in the distance rather like natural elevations than the work of men's hands. They differ greatly in form, size and height. Some are mere conical heaps, varying from 50 to 150 feet high; others have a broad flat summit, and very precipitous cliff-like sites furrowed by deep ravines worn by the winter rains. The principal ruins are-- (1) the group immediately opposite Mosul, including the great mounds of Kouyunjik and Nebbi Yunus; (2) that near the junction of the Tigris and Zab comprising the mounds of Nimroud and Athur; (3) Khorsabad, about ten miles...

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Nineveh in Easton's Bible Dictionary

First mentioned in Gen. 10:11, which is rendered in the Revised Version, "He [i.e., Nimrod] went forth into Assyria and builded Nineveh." It is not again noticed till the days of Jonah, when it is described (Jonah 3:3; 4:11) as a great and populous city, the flourishing capital of the Assyrian empire (2 Kings 19:36; Isa. 37:37). The book of the prophet Nahum is almost exclusively taken up with prophetic denunciations against this city. Its ruin and utter desolation are foretold (Nah.1:14; 3:19, etc.). Zephaniah also (2:13-15) predicts its destruction along with the fall of the empire of which it was the capital. From this time there is no mention of it in Scripture till it is named in gospel history (Matt. 12:41; Luke 11:32). This "exceeding great city" lay on the eastern or left bank of the river Tigris, along which it stretched for some 30 miles, having an average breadth of 10 miles or more from the river back toward the eastern hills. This whole extensive space is now one immense area of ruins. Occupying a central position on the great highway between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, thus uniting the East and the West, wealth flowed into it from many sources, so that it became the greatest of all ancient cities. About B.C. 633 the Assyrian empire began to show signs of weakness, and Nineveh was attacked by the Medes, who subsequently, about B.C. 625, being joined by the Babylonians and Susianians, again attacked it, when it fell, and was razed to the ground. The Assyrian empire then came to an end, the Medes and Babylonians dividing its provinces between them. "After having ruled for more than six hundred years with hideous tyranny and violence, from the Caucasus and the Caspian to the Persian Gulf, and from beyond the Tigris to...

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Nineveh in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Nimrod builded Nineveh (Genesis 10:11); Herodotus (i. 7) makes Ninus founder of Nineveh. and grandson of Belus founder of Babylon; which implies that it was from Babylon, as Scripture says, that Nineveh's founder came. Nin is the Assyrian Hercules. Their mythology also makes Ninus son of Nimrod. Jonah is the next Scripture after Genesis 10 that mentions Nineveh. (See JONAH.) Sennacherib after his host's destruction "went and dwelt at Nineveh" (2 Kings 19:36). Jonah (Jonah 3:3) describes it as an "exceeding great city of three days' journey" round (i.e. 60 miles, at 20 miles per day) with 120,000 children "who knew not their right hand from their left" (Jonah 4:11), which would make a population in all of 600,000 or even one million. Diodorus Siculus (ii. 3), agreeing with Jonah's "three days' journey," makes the circumference 55 miles, pastures and pleasure grounds being included within, from whence Jonah appositely (Jonah 4:11) mentions "much cattle." G. Smith thinks that the ridges enclosing Nebi Yunus and Koyunjik (the mounds called "tels" opposite Mosul) were only the walls of inner Nineveh, the city itself extending beyond to the mound Yarenijah. The parallelogram in Assyria covered with remains has Khorsabad N.E.; Koyunjik and Nebi Yunus (Nineveh in the narrow sense) near the Tigris N.W.; Nimrud and Athur between the Tigris and Zab, N.W.; and Karamles at a distance inward from the Zab S.E. From Koyunjik to Nimrud is 18 miles; from Khorsabad to Karamles 18; from Koyunjik to Khorsabad 13 or 14; from Nimrud to Karamles 14. The length was greater than the breadth; so Jonah 3:4 "entered into the city a day's journey." The longer sides were 150 furlongs each, the shorter 90 furlongs, the whole circuit 480 or 460 miles. Babylon had a circuit of only 385 miles (Clitarchus in Diod. ii. 7, Strabo xvi. 737). The walls were 100 ft. high, with 1,500 towers, and broad enough for three chariots abreast. Shereef Khan is the northern extremity of the collection of mounds on the eastern bank of the Tigris, and is five and a half miles N. of Koyunjik. There is also an enclosure, 5,000 yards in circuit, once enclosed by a moat at Selamivah three miles N. of Nimrud. Nimrud in inscriptions is called Kalkhu or Calah in Genesis 10:11; Khorsabad is called Sargina from Sargon. At Kileh Sherghat is the presumed original capital," Asshur," 60 miles S. of Mosul, on the right or western bank of the Tigris. Sennacherib first made Nineveh the capital. Nineveh was at first only a fort to keep the Babylonian conquests around. It subsequently, with Rehoboth, Ir, Calah, and Resen, formed one great city, "Nineveh" in the larger sense. Thothmes III of Egypt is mentioned in inscriptions as capturing Nineveh. Phraortes the Mede perished in attempting to do so (Herodotus i. 102). Cyaxares his successor, after at first raising the siege owing to a Scythic invasion (Herodotus i. 103, 106) 625 B.C., finally succeeded in concert with the Babylonian Nabopolassar, 606 B.C., Saracus the last king, Esarhaddon's grandson, set fire to the palace and perished in the flames, as Ctesias states, and as the marks of fire on the walls still confirm. So Nahum 3:13; Nahum 3:15, "fire shall devour thy bars." Charred wood, calcined alabaster, and heat splintered figures abound. Nahum (Nahum 2) and Zephaniah (Zephaniah 2:13-15) foretold its doom; and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 31) shortly after attests the completeness of its overthrow, as a warning of the fatal issue of pride, Isaiah 10:7-14; Diodorus (ii. 27) says there...

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Nineveh in Hitchcock's Bible Names

handsome; agreeable

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Nineveh Scripture - Nahum 3:7

Nahum 3:7 - And it shall come to pass, [that] all they that look upon thee shall flee from thee, and say, Nineveh is laid waste: who will bemoan her? whence shall I seek comforters for thee?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Nahum/3/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 4:11

And should not I spare Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand; and [also] much cattle?

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/4/

Nineveh Scripture - Nahum 2:8

But Nineveh [is] of old like a pool of water: yet they shall flee away. Stand, stand, [shall they cry]; but none shall look back.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Nahum/2/

Nineveh Scripture - Matthew 12:41

The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it: because they repented at the preaching of Jonas; and, behold, a greater than Jonas [is] here.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Matthew/12/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:7

And he caused [it] to be proclaimed and published through Nineveh by the decree of the king and his nobles, saying, Let neither man nor beast, herd nor flock, taste any thing: let them not feed, nor drink water:

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Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:4

And Jonah began to enter into the city a day's journey, and he cried, and said, Yet forty days, and Nineveh shall be overthrown.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/3/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:6

For word came unto the king of Nineveh, and he arose from his throne, and he laid his robe from him, and covered [him] with sackcloth, and sat in ashes.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/3/

Nineveh Scripture - Zephaniah 2:13

And he will stretch out his hand against the north, and destroy Assyria; and will make Nineveh a desolation, [and] dry like a wilderness.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Zephaniah/2/

Nineveh Scripture - Genesis 10:11

Out of that land went forth Asshur, and builded Nineveh, and the city Rehoboth, and Calah,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/10/

Nineveh Scripture - 2 Kings 19:36

So Sennacherib king of Assyria departed, and went and returned, and dwelt at Nineveh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/19/

Nineveh Scripture - Isaiah 37:37

So Sennacherib king of Assyria departed, and went and returned, and dwelt at Nineveh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Isaiah/37/

Nineveh Scripture - Jonah 3:2

Arise, go unto Nineveh, that great city, and preach unto it the preaching that I bid thee.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jonah/3/

Mizpah Scripture - Genesis 31:49

And Mizpah; for he said, The LORD watch between me and thee, when we are absent one from another.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Genesis/31/

Mizpah Scripture - Jeremiah 41:10

Then Ishmael carried away captive all the residue of the people that [were] in Mizpah, [even] the king's daughters, and all the people that remained in Mizpah, whom Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had committed to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam: and Ishmael the son of Nethaniah carried them away captive, and departed to go over to the Ammonites.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/41/

Mizpah Scripture - Jeremiah 41:1

Now it came to pass in the seventh month, [that] Ishmael the son of Nethaniah the son of Elishama, of the seed royal, and the princes of the king, even ten men with him, came unto Gedaliah the son of Ahikam to Mizpah; and there they did eat bread together in Mizpah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/41/

Moab in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

mo'-ab, mo'-ab-its (Moab, mo'abh, Moabite Stone, M-'-B; Greek (Septuagint) Moab, he Moabeitis, Moabitis; Moabite, mo'abhi; Moabites, bene mo'abh): 1. The Land: Moab was the district East of the Dead Sea, extending from a point some distance North of it to its southern end. The eastern boundary was indefinite, being the border of the desert which is irregular. The length of the territory was about 50 miles and the average width about 30. It is a high tableland, averaging some 3,000 ft. above the level of the Mediterranean and 4,300 ft. above that of the Dead Sea. The aspect of the land, as one looks at it from the western side of the Dead Sea, is that of a range of mountains with a very precipitous frontage, but the elevation of this ridge above the interior is very slight. Deep chasms lead down from the tableland to the Dead Sea shore, the principal one being the gorge of the river Arnon, which is about 1,700 ft. deep and 2 or more miles in width at the level of the tableland, but very narrow at the bottom and with exceedingly precipitous banks. About 13 miles back from the mouth of the river the gorge divides, and farther back it subdivides, so that several valleys are formed of diminishing depth as they approach the desert border. These are referred to in Nu 21:14 as the "valleys of the Arnon." The "valley of Zered" (Nu 21:12), which was on the southern border, drops down to the southern end of the Dead Sea, and although not so long or deep as the Arnon, is of the same nature in its lower reaches, very difficult to cross, dividing into two branches, but at a point much nearer the sea. The stream is not so large as the Arnon, but is quite copious, even in summer. These gorges have such precipitous sides that it would be very difficult for an army to cross them, except in their upper courses near the desert where they become shallow. The Israelites passed them in that region, probably along the present Hajj road and the line of the Mecca Railway. The tableland is fertile but lacks water. The fountains and streams in the valleys and on the slopes toward the Dead Sea are abundant, but the uplands are almost destitute of flowing water. The inhabitants supply themselves by means of cisterns, many of which are ancient, but many of those used in ancient times are ruined. The population must have been far greater formerly than now. The rainfall is usually sufficient to mature the crops, although the rain falls in winter only. The fertility of the country in ancient times is indicated by the numerous towns and villages known to have existed there, mentioned in Scripture and on the Moabite Stone, the latter giving some not found elsewhere. The principal of these were: Ar (Nu 21:15); Ataroth, Dibon, Jazer, Nimrah, Nebo (Nu 32:3); Beth-peor (Dt 3:29); Beth-diblaim, Bozrah, Kerioth (Jer 48:22-24); Kir (Isa 15:1); Medeba, Elealeh, Zoar (Isa 15:2,4,5); Kirheres (Isa 16:11); Sibmah (Josh 13:19); in all, some 45 place- names in Moab are known, most of the towns being in ruins. Kir of Moab is represented in the modern Kerak, the most important of all and the government center of the district. Madeba now represents the ancient Medeba, and has become noted for the discovery of a medieval map of Israel, in mosaic, of considerable archaeological value. Rabbath-moab and Heshbon (modern Rabba and Hesban) are miserable villages, and the country is subject to the raids of the Bedouin tribes of the neighboring desert, which discourages agriculture. But the land is still good pasture ground for cattle and sheep, as in ancient times (Nu 32:3,4). 2. The People: The Moabites were of Semitic stock and of kin to the Hebrews, as is indicated by their descent from Lot, the nephew of Abraham (Gen 19:30-37), and by their language which is practically the same as the Hebrew. This is clear from the inscription...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/M/MOAB;+MOABITES/

Moab in Naves Topical Bible

1. Son of Lot Ge 19:37 -2. Plains of Israelites come in De 2:17,18 Military forces numbered in Nu 26:3,63 The law rehearsed in, by Moses Nu 35; 36; De 29; 30; 31; 32; 33 The Israelites renew their covenant in De 29:1 The land of promise allotted in Jos 13:32

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/M/MOAB/

Moab in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(of his father), Mo'abites. Moab was the son of the Lot's eldest daughter, the progenitor of the Moabites. Zoar was the cradle of the race of Lot. From this centre the brother tribes spread themselves. The Moabites first inhabited the rich highlands which crown the eastern side of the chasm of the Dead Sea, extending as far north as the mountain of Gilead, from which country they expelled the Emims, the original inhabitants, De 2:11 but they themselves were afterward driven southward by the warlike Amorites, who had crossed the Jordan, and were confined to the country south of the river Arnon, which formed their northern boundary. Nu 21:13; Jud 11:18 The territory occupied by Moab at the period of its greatest extent, before the invasion of the Amorites, divided itself naturally into three distinct and independent portions:-- (1) The enclosed corner or canton south of the Arnon was the "field of Moab." Ru 1:1,2,6 etc. (2) The more open rolling country north of the Arnon, opposite Jericho, and up to the hills of Gilead, was the "land of Moab." De 1:5; 32:49 etc. (3) The sunk district in the tropical depths of the Jordan valley. Nu 22:1 etc. The Israelites, in entering the promised land, did not pass through the Moabites, Jud 11:18 but conquered the Amorites, who occupied the country from which the Moabites had been so lately expelled. After the conquest of Canaan the relations of Moab with Israel were of a mixed character, sometimes warlike and sometimes peaceable. With the tribe of Benjamin they had at least one severe struggle, in union with their kindred the Ammonites. Jud 3:12-30 The story of Ruth, on the other hand, testifies to the existence of a friendly intercourse between Moab and Bethlehem, one of the towns of Judah. By his descent from Ruth, David may be said to have had Moabite blood in his veins. He committed his parents to the protection of the king of Moab, when hard pressed by Saul. 1Sa 22:3,4 But here all friendly relations stop forever. The next time the name is mentioned is in the account of David's war, who made the Moabites tributary. 2Sa 8:2; 1Ch 18:2 At the disruption of the kingdom Moab seems to have fallen to the northern realm. At the death of Ahab the Moabites refused to pay tribute and asserted their independence, making war upon the kingdom of Judah. 2Ch 22:1 ... As a natural consequence of the late events, Israel, Judah and Edom united in an attack on Moab, resulting in the complete overthrow of the Moabites. Falling back into their own country, they were followed and their cities and farms destroyed. Finally, shut up within the walls of his own capital, the king, Mesha, in the sight of the thousands who covered the sides of that vast amphitheater, killed and burnt his child as a propitiatory sacrifice to the cruel gods of his country. Isaiah, chs. Isa 15,16,25:10-12 predicts the utter annihilation of the Moabites; and they are frequently denounced by the subsequent prophets. For the religion of the Moabites see CHEMOSH; MOLECH; PEOR. See also Tristram's "Land of Moab." Present condition. --(Noldeke says that the extinction of the Moabites was about A.D. 200, at the time when the Yemen tribes Galib and Gassara entered the eastern districts of the Jordan. Since A.D. 536 the last trace of the name Moab, which lingered in the town of Kir-moab, has given place to Kerak, its modern name. Over the whole region are scattered many ruins of ancient cities; and while the country is almost bare of larger vegetation, it is still a rich pasture-ground, with occasional fields of grain. The land thus gives evidence of its former wealth and power. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/M/Moab/

Moab in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the seed of the father, or, according to others, the desirable land, the eldest son of Lot (Gen. 19:37), of incestuous birth. (2.) Used to denote the people of Moab (Num. 22:3- 14; Judg. 3:30; 2 Sam. 8:2; Jer. 48:11, 13). (3.) The land of Moab (Jer. 48:24), called also the "country of Moab" (Ruth 1:2, 6; 2:6), on the east of Jordan and the Dead Sea, and south of the Arnon (Num. 21:13, 26). In a wider sense it included the whole region that had been occupied by the Amorites. It bears the modern name of Kerak. In the Plains of Moab, opposite Jericho (Num. 22:1; 26:63; Josh. 13:32), the children of Israel had their last encampment before they entered the land of Canaan. It was at that time in the possession of the Amorites (Num. 21:22). "Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah," and "died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the Lord" (Deut. 34:5, 6). "Surely if we had nothing else to interest us in the land of Moab, the fact that it was from the top of Pisgah, its noblest height, this mightiest of the prophets looked out with eye undimmed upon the Promised Land; that it was here on Nebo, its loftiest mountain, that he died his solitary death; that it was here, in the valley over against Beth-peor, he found his mysterious sepulchre, we have enough to enshrine the memory in our hearts."

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/M/Moab/

Moab in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

("from father"), i.e. the incestuous offspring of Lot's older daughter, near Zoar, S.E. of the Dead Sea (Genesis 19:37). Originally the Moabites dwelt due E. of the Dead Sea, from whence they expelled the Emims. Their territory was 40 miles long, 12 wide, the modern Belka or Kerak (Deuteronomy 2:10-11). Afterward, Sihon king of the Amorites drove them S. of the river Amon, now wady el Mojib (Numbers 21:13; Numbers 21:26-30; Judges 11:13; Judges 11:18), which thenceforward was their northern boundary. Israel was forbidden to meddle with them (Judges 11:9; Judges 11:19) on account of the tie of blood through Lot, Abraham's nephew, for Jehovah gave Ar unto the children of Lot, having dispossessed the giant Emims. It was only when Moab seduced Israel to idolatry and impurity (Numbers 25), and hired Balaam to curse them, that they were excluded from Jehovah's congregation to the tenth generation (Deuteronomy 23:3-4). Ammon was more roving than Moab and occupied the pastures to the N.E. outside the mountains. Moab was more settled in habits, and remained nearer the original seat Zoar. Its territory after the Amorite conquest was circumscribed, but well fortified by nature (Numbers 21:20, margin); called "the field of Moab" (Rth 1:1-63, and "the corner of Moab" (Numbers 24:17; Jeremiah 48:45). The country N. of Arnon, opposite Jericho reaching to Gilead, was more open; vast prairie-like plains broken by rocky prominences; "the land of Moab" (Deuteronomy 1:5; Deuteronomy 32:49). Besides there was the Arboth Moab, "plains (rather deep valley) of Moab," the dry sunken valley of Jordan (Numbers 22:1). Outside of the hills enclosing Moab proper on the S.E. are the uncultivated pastures called midbar, "wilderness," facing Moab (Numbers 21:11). Through it Israel advanced. The song (Exodus 15:15) at the Red Sea first mentions the nation, "trembling shall take hold upon ... the mighty men of Moab." Israel's request for a passage through Edom and Moab, and liberty to purchase bread and water, was refused (Judges 11:17; Numbers 20:14-21). In Israel's circuitous march round the two kingdoms they at last, when it suited their own selfish ends and when they could not prevent Israel's march, sold them bread and water (Deuteronomy 2:28- 29; Deuteronomy 23:3-4). The exclusion of a Moabite from the congregation only forbade his naturalization, not his dwelling in Israel nor an Israelite marrying a Moabitess. Ruth married Naomi's son, but became a proselyte. The law of exclusion it is clear could never have been written after David's time, whose great grandmother was a Moabitess. Israel was occupying the country N. of Arnon which Moab had just lost to Sihon, and which Israel in turn had wrested from him, and with its main force had descended from the upper level to the Shittim plains, the Arboth Moab, in the Jordan valley, when Balak, alarmed for his already diminished territory, induced the Midianite "elders" to join him and hired Balak; virtually, though never actually, "warring against Israel" (Joshua 24:9; Judges 11:25). The daughters of Moab, mentioned in Numbers 25:1, were those with whom Israel "began whoredom," but the main guilt was Midian's, and on Midian fell the vengeance (Numbers 25:16-18; Numbers 31:1-18). Moab's licentious rites furnished the occasion, but Midian was the active agent in corrupting the people. Balak (contrast, "the former king of Moab," Numbers 21:26) was probably not hereditary king but a Midianite; the Midianites taking advantage...

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/M/Moab/

Moab in Hitchcock's Bible Names

of his father

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/M/Moab/

Moab Scripture - Judges 3:12

And the children of Israel did evil again in the sight of the LORD: and the LORD strengthened Eglon the king of Moab against Israel, because they had done evil in the sight of the LORD.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/3/

Moab Scripture - Judges 10:6

And the children of Israel did evil again in the sight of the LORD, and served Baalim, and Ashtaroth, and the gods of Syria, and the gods of Zidon, and the gods of Moab, and the gods of the children of Ammon, and the gods of the Philistines, and forsook the LORD, and served not him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/10/

Moab Scripture - Jeremiah 48:36

Therefore mine heart shall sound for Moab like pipes, and mine heart shall sound like pipes for the men of Kirheres: because the riches [that] he hath gotten are perished.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/48/

Moab Scripture - 2 Kings 3:13

And Elisha said unto the king of Israel, What have I to do with thee? get thee to the prophets of thy father, and to the prophets of thy mother. And the king of Israel said unto him, Nay: for the LORD hath called these three kings together, to deliver them into the hand of Moab.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/3/

Moab Scripture - Judges 11:17

Then Israel sent messengers unto the king of Edom, saying, Let me, I pray thee, pass through thy land: but the king of Edom would not hearken [thereto]. And in like manner they sent unto the king of Moab: but he would not [consent]: and Israel abode in Kadesh.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/11/

Moab Scripture - 2 Kings 3:4

And Mesha king of Moab was a sheepmaster, and rendered unto the king of Israel an hundred thousand lambs, and an hundred thousand rams, with the wool.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Kings/3/

Moab Scripture - 2 Chronicles 20:23

For the children of Ammon and Moab stood up against the inhabitants of mount Seir, utterly to slay and destroy [them]: and when they had made an end of the inhabitants of Seir, every one helped to destroy another.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/20/

Moab Scripture - Judges 3:15

But when the children of Israel cried unto the LORD, the LORD raised them up a deliverer, Ehud the son of Gera, a Benjamite, a man lefthanded: and by him the children of Israel sent a present unto Eglon the king of Moab.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Judges/3/

Moab Scripture - Jeremiah 48:11

Moab hath been at ease from his youth, and he hath settled on his lees, and hath not been emptied from vessel to vessel, neither hath he gone into captivity: therefore his taste remained in him, and his scent is not changed.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/48/

Moab Scripture - Jeremiah 27:3

And send them to the king of Edom, and to the king of Moab, and to the king of the Ammonites, and to the king of Tyrus, and to the king of Zidon, by the hand of the messengers which come to Jerusalem unto Zedekiah king of Judah;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/27/

Mount Hor in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

hor (hor ha-har; literally, "Hor, the mountain"): 1. Not Jebel Neby Harun: (1) a tradition identifying this mountain with Jebel Neby Harun may be traced from the time of Josephus (Ant., IV, iv, 7) downward. Eusebius, Onomasticon (s.v. Hor) favors this identification, which has been accepted by many travelers and scholars. In HDB, while noting the fact that it has been questioned, Professor Hull devotes all the space at his disposal to a description of Jebel Neby Harun. It is now recognized, however, that this identification is impossible. Niebuhr (Reise nach Arabic, 238), Pocoke (Description of the East, I, 157), Robinson (BR, I, 185), Ewald (Hist. of Israel, II, 201, note), and others had pointed out difficulties in the way, but the careful discussion of Dr. H. Clay Trumbull (Kadesh Barnea, 127 ff) finally disposed of the claims of Jebel Neby Harun. 2. Suggested Identification: From Nu 20:22; 33:37 we may perhaps infer that Mt. Hor, "in the edge of the land of Edom," was about a day's journey from Kadesh. The name "Hor the mountain" suggests a prominent feature of the landscape. Aaron was buried there (Nu 20:28; Dt 32:50). It was therefore not in Mt. Seir (Dt 2:5), of which not even a foot-breadth was given to Israel. Jebel Neby Harun is certainly a prominent feature of the landscape, towering over the tumbled hills that form the western edges of the Edom plateau to a height of 4,800 ft. But it is much more than a day's journey from Kadesh, while it is well within the boundary of Mt. Seir. The king of Arad was alarmed at the march to Mt. Hor. Had Israel marched toward Jebel Neby Harun, away to the Southeast, it could have caused him no anxiety, as he dwelt in the north. 3. Jebel Maderah: This points to some eminence to the North or Northeast of Kadesh. A hill meeting sufficiently all these conditions is Jebel Maderah (see HALAK, MOUNT), which rises to the Northeast of `Ain qadis (Kadeshbarnea). It stands at the extreme Northwest boundary of the land of Edom, yet not within that boundary. Above the barrenness of the surrounding plain this "large, singular-looking, isolated chalk hill" rises "alone like a lofty citadel," "steep- sided" and "quite naked." Here the solemn transactions described in Nu 20:22 ff could have been carried out literally, "in the sight of all the congregation." While certainty is impossible, no more likely suggestion has been made. (2) A mountain named only in Nu 34:7 f as on the North boundary of the land of Israel. No success has attended the various attempts made to identify this particular height. Some would make it Mt. Hermon (Hull, HDB, under the word); others Jebel Akkar, an outrunner on the Northeast of Lebanon (Furrer, ZDPV, VIII, 27), and others the mountain at the "knee of" Nahr el-Qasimiyeh (van Kasteren, Rev. Biblical, 1895, 30 f). In Ezek 47:15 ha-derekh, should certainly be amended to chadhrakh, a proper name, instead of "the way." Possibly then Mt. Hor should disappear from Nu 34:7 f, and we should read, with slight emendation, "From the great sea ye shall draw a line for you as far as Hadrach, and from Hadrach ...."

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/H/HOR,+MOUNT/

Mount Hor in Naves Topical Bible

The mountain upon which Aaron died Nu 20:22-29; 21:4; 33:38,39; 34:7,8; De 32:50

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/H/HOR/

Mount Hor in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(mountain), Mount. 1. The mountain on which Aaron died. Nu 20:25,27 It was "on the boundary line," Nu 20:23 or "at the edge," ch. Nu 33:37 of the land of Edom. It was the halting-place of the people next after Kadesh, ch. Nu 20:22; 33:37 and they quitted it for Zalmonah, ch. Nu 33:41 in the road to the Red Sea. ch. Nu 21:4 It was during the encampment at Kadesh that Aaron was gathered to his fathers. Mount Hor is situated on the eastern side of the great valley of the Arabah, the highest and most conspicuous of the whole range of the sandstone mountains of Edom, having close beneath it on its: eastern side the mysterious; city of Petra. It is now the Jebel Nebi-Harim "the mountain of the prophet Aaron." Its height is 4800 feet above the Mediterranean; that is to say, about 1700 feet above the town of Petra, 4800 above the level of the Arabah, and more than 6000 above the Dead Sea. The mountain is marked far and near by its double top, which rises like a huge castellated building from a lower base, and is surmounted by a circular dome of the tomb of Aaron, a distinct white spot on the dark red surface of the mountain. The chief interest of Mount Hor consists in the prospect from its summit, the last view of Aaron --that view which was to him what Pisgah was to his brother. 2. A mountain, entirely distinct from the preceding, named in Nu 34:7,8 only, as one of the marks of the northern boundary of the land which the children of Israel were about to conquer. This Mount Hor is the great chain of Lebanon itself.

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/H/Hor/

Mount Hor in Easton's Bible Dictionary

mountain. (1.) One of the mountains of the chain of Seir or Edom, on the confines of Idumea (Num. 20:22-29; 33:37). It was one of the stations of the Israelites in the wilderness (33:37), which they reached in the circuitous route they were obliged to take because the Edomites refused them a passage through their territory. It was during the encampment here that Aaron died (Num. 33:37-41). (See AARON -T0000002.) The Israelites passed this mountain several times in their wanderings. It bears the modern name of Jebel Harun, and is the highest and most conspicious of the whole range. It stands about midway between the Dead Sea and the Elanitic gulf. It has two summits, in the hallow between which it is supposed that Aaron died. Others, however, suppose that this mountain is the modern Jebel Madurah, on the opposite, i.e., the western, side of the Arabah. (2.) One of the marks of the northern boundary of Israel (Num. 34:7, 8). Nowhere else mentioned. Perhaps it is one of the peaks of Lebanon.

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/H/Hor/

Mount Hor in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

1. The mount in which Aaron died (Numbers 20:22-23; Numbers 20:25-28). An archaic form of har, "mountain." The only instance in which the proper name comes first, "Hor the mountain," the mount upon the mountain. It "rises like a huge castellated building from a lower base" (Stanley, Sinai and Israel, 86). Now Jebel Harun" by the coast (or 'edge') of the land of Edom" (Numbers 33:37-38). On the E. side of the Arabah, close to Petra. The white chalk summit rises on a dark red sandstone bore rock, 5,300 feet above the Mediterranean. On the northernmost of its two summits is shown a square building with dome, called the tomb of Aaron. A flight of steps cut in the rock leads up a precipice to it. The roof is decorated with ostrich shells and such like ornaments. It is an ordinary Moslem weh; over the door is an inscription stating that the building was restored by Es Shimani, son of Mohammed Calain, sultan of Egypt, by his father's orders, in the year 739 of the Hegira; square almost, 28 ft. by 33 ft., having two chambers one above the other. The host encamped in the Arabah below at Moseroth (Numbers 33:30), or Mosera (Deuteronomy 10:6). (See AARON.) His death resembled Moses' in being on a mountain, but differed from it in being in the presence of Moses and Eleazar on the mount to which they ascended "in the sight of all the congregation." Moses' death was in solitude, but with Gilead's heights, and Benjamin's hills, and the rich Jordan valley in view; whereas Aaron's last looks rested on rugged Edom, and chalky mount Seir, and the red sandstone rocks round Petra, and the dreary Arabah. 2. The name Hor is applied to the whole western crest of Lebanon, 80 miles long from the E. of Sidon to the entering in of Hamath (Kalat el Husn close to Hums, i.e. ancient Hamath); the northern boundary appointed to Israel (Numbers 34:8).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/H/Hor/

Mount Hor in Hitchcock's Bible Names

who conceives

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/H/Hor/

Mount Hor Scripture - Numbers 20:22

And the children of Israel, [even] the whole congregation, journeyed from Kadesh, and came unto mount Hor.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Numbers/20/

Mount Hor Scripture - Deuteronomy 32:50

And die in the mount whither thou goest up, and be gathered unto thy people; as Aaron thy brother died in mount Hor, and was gathered unto his people:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/32/

Mount Moriah in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Genesis 22:2; 2 Chronicles 3:1. (See JEHOVAH JIREH; GERIZIM.) What Jehovah has made one see (this hophal mowreh occurs four times in the Pentateuch, nowhere in later books) "the vision of Jehovah". In the same neighborhood He vouchsafed a vision to Abram (Genesis 14; Genesis 15:1) after Melchizedek had met him in the valley near Salem and Abram paid tithe of the spoils of Chedorlaomer. Afterward on Moriah he offered Isaac (Genesis 22:2; Genesis 22:14). Abraham saw Moriah at some little distance (Genesis 22:4) on the third day; the distance, two days' journey from Beersheba, would just bring him to Zion, but not so far as Moreh and Gerizim (Genesis 12:6) where some fix Moriah. "The mount of the Lord" (Genesis 22:14) means almost always Mount Zion. The proverb "in the Mount of Jehovah it (or He) shall be seen" probably originated in Jerusalem under Melchizedek. Jehovah's vision to David in the same spot, before the preparation for building the temple there, revived the name Moriah (2 Samuel 24:16; 2 Samuel 24:24-25.) The threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite was the spot on which David reared an altar by Gad's direction from Jehovah. The Angel of Jehovah had stood by Araunah's threshing floor; there David saw Him, and Araunah (Ornan) also, subsequently on turning back, saw Him and hid himself. Then Ornan saw David, and made over to him the threshing floor (1 Chronicles 21:15-16; 1 Chronicles 21:18-26). Jehovah testified His acceptance of David's sacrifice there by sending down fire to consume it (Leviticus 9:24; 1 Kings 18:24; 1 Kings 18:38; 2 Chronicles 7:1). So thenceforth David sacrificed there, and no longer on the altar at Gibeon where the tabernacle was, separate from the ark, which was at Zion; for he could not go to Gibeon on account of the sword of the Angel, i.e. the pestilence. God's answer to his sacrifice at this altar of the threshing floor, and God's removal of the plague, determined David's choice of it as the site of the temple (1 Chronicles 28:2; 1 Chronicles 21:28; 1 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 3:1, etc.). It lay, like all threshing floors, outside the city, upon Mount Moriah, N.E. of Zion. Evidently the threshing floor on Moriah was near the real Mount Zion, the city of David (on the eastern not the western half of Jerusalem).

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/M/Moriah/

Mount Moriah in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(chosen by Jehovah). 1. The land of Moriah --On "one of the mountains" in this district took place the sacrifice of Isaac. Ge 22:2 Its position is doubtful, some thinking it to be Mount MOriah, others that Moreh, near Shechem, is meant. [See MOUNT MORIAH] 2. Mount Moriah. --The elevation on which Solomon built the temple, where God appeared to David "in the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite." it is the Eastern eminence of Jerusalem, separated from Mount Zion by the Tyropoeon valley. The tope was levelled by Solomon, and immense walls were built around it from the base to enlarge the level surface for the temple area. A tradition which first appears in a definite shape in Josephus, and is now almost universally accepted, asserts that the "Mount Moriah" of the Chronicles is identical with the "mountain" in "the land of Moriah" of Genesis, and that the spot on which Jehovah appeared to David, and on which the temple was built, was the very spot of the sacrifice of Isaac. (Smith, Stanley and Grove are, however, inclined to doubt this tradition.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/M/Moriah/

Mount Moriah in Easton's Bible Dictionary

the chosen of Jehovah. Some contend that Mount Gerizim is meant, but most probably we are to regard this as one of the hills of Jerusalem. Here Solomon's temple was built, on the spot that had been the threshing-floor of Ornan the Jebusite (2 Sam. 24:24, 25; 2 Chr. 3:1). It is usually included in Zion, to the north-east of which it lay, and from which it was separated by the Tyropoean valley. This was "the land of Moriah" to which Abraham went to offer up his son Isaac (Gen. 22:2). It has been supposed that the highest point of the temple hill, which is now covered by the Mohammedan Kubbetes-Sakhrah, or "Dome of the Rock," is the actual site of Araunah's threshing- floor. Here also, one thousand years after Abraham, David built an altar and offered sacrifices to God. (See JERUSALEM -T0002043; NUMBERING THE PEOPLE -T0002753.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/M/Moriah/

Mount Moriah in Hitchcock's Bible Names

bitterness of the Lord

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/M/Moriah/

Mount Moriah Scripture - 2 Chronicles 3:1

Then Solomon began to build the house of the LORD at Jerusalem in mount Moriah, where [the LORD] appeared unto David his father, in the place that David had prepared in the threshingfloor of Ornan the Jebusite.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/2+Chronicles/3/

Mount Nebo in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

(har nebho; Nabau): A mountain in the land of Moab which Moses ascended at the command of God in order that he might see the Land of Promise which he was never to enter. There also he was to die. From the following passages (namely, Nu 33:47; Dt 32:49; 34:1), we gather that it was not far from the plain of Moab in which Israel was encamped; that it was a height standing out to the West of the mountains of Abarim; that it lay to the East of Jericho; and that it was a spot from which a wide and comprehensive view of Israel could be obtained. None of these conditions are met by Jebel `Attarus, which is too far to the East, and is fully 15 miles South of a line drawn eastward from Jericho. Jebel 'Osha, again, in Mt. Gilead, commands, indeed, an extensive view; but it lies too far to the North, being at least 15 miles North of a line drawn eastward from Jericho. Both of these sites have had their advocates as claimants for the honor of representing the Biblical Nebo. The "head" or "top" of Pisgah is evidently identical with Mt. Nebo (Dt 34:1). After Moses' death he was buried "in the valley in the land of Moab," over against Beth-peor. The name Neba is found on a ridge which, some 5 miles Southwest of Hesban and opposite the northern end of the Dead Sea, runs out to the West from the plateau of Moab, "sinking gradually: at first a broad brown field of arable land, then a flat top crowned by a ruined cairn, then a narrower ridge ending in the summit called Siagbah, whence the slopes fall steeply on all sides. The name Nebo or Neba (the "knob" or "tumulus") applies to the flat top with the cairn, and the name Tal`at es-Sufa to the ascent leading up to the ridge from the North. Thus we have three names which seem to connect the ridge with that whence Moses is related to have viewed the Promised Land, namely, first, Nebo, which is identically the same word as the modern Neba; secondly, Siaghah, which is radically identical with the Aramaic Se`ath, the word standing instead of Nebo in the Targum of Onkelos (Nu 32:3), where it is called the burial place of Moses; thirdly, Tal`at es-Sufa, which is radically identical with the Hebrew Zuph (tsuph), whence Mizpah (mitspah) and Zophim (tsophim. .... The name Pisgah is not now known, but the discovery of Zophim (compare Nu 23:14) confirms the view now generally held, that it is but another title of the Nebo range." Neither Mt. Hermon nor Dan (Tell el-Qady) is visible from this point; nor can Zoar be seen; and if the Mediterranean is the hinder sea, it also is invisible. But, as Driver says ("Dt," ICC, 419), the terms in Dt 34:1,3 are hyperbolical, and must be taken as including points filled in by the imagination as well as those actually visible to the eye. Mr. Birch argues in favor of Tal`at el-Benat, whence he believes Dan and Zoar to be visible, while he identifies "the hinder sea" with the Dead Sea (PEFS, 1898, 110 ff).

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/N/NEBO,+MOUNT/

Mount Nebo in Naves Topical Bible

1. A city allotted to the tribe of Reuben Nu 32:3,38; 1Ch 5:8 Prophecies concerning Isa 15:2; Jer 48:1,22 -2. A mountain range east of the Jordan; Moses views Canaan from De 32:49,50 Dies on De 34:1 -3. A city in territory of the tribe of Judah Ezr 2:29; Ne 7:33 -4. The ancestor of certain Jews Ezr 10:43 -5. A Babylonian idol Isa 46:1

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/N/NEBO/

Mount Nebo in Smiths Bible Dictionary

(prophet), Mount, the mountain from which Moses took his first and last view of the promised land. De 32:41; 34:1 It is described as in the land of Moab, facing Jericho; the head or summit of a mountain called Pisgah, which again seems to have formed a portion of the general range of Abarim. (Notwithstanding the minuteness of this description, it is only recently that any one has succeeded in pointing out any spot which answers to Nebo. Tristram identifies it with a peak (Jebel Nebbah) of the Abarim or Moab mountains, about three miles southwest of Heshban (Heshbon) and about a mile and a half due west of Baal-meon. "It overlooks the mouth of the Jordan, over against Jericho," De 34:1 and the gentle slopes of its sides may well answer to the "field of Zophim." Nu 23:14 Jebel Nebbah is 2683 feet high. It is not an isolated peak but one of a succession of bare turf-clad eminences, so linked together that the depressions between them were mere hollows rather than valleys. It commands a wide prospect. Prof. Paine, of the American Exploration Society, contends that Jebel Nebbah, the highest point of the range, is Mount Nebo, that Jebel Siaghah, the extreme headland of the hill, is Mount Pisgah, and that "the mountains of Abarim "are the cliffs west of these points, and descending toward the Dead Sea. Probably the whole mountain or range was called sometimes by the name of one peak and sometimes by that of another as is frequently the case with mountains now. --ED.)

Link: https://bible-history.com/smiths/N/Nebo+(1)/

Mount Nebo in Easton's Bible Dictionary

proclaimer; prophet. (1.) A Chaldean god whose worship was introduced into Assyria by Pul (Isa. 46:1; Jer. 48:1). To this idol was dedicated the great temple whose ruins are still seen at Birs Nimrud. A statue of Nebo found at Calah, where it was set up by Pul, king of Assyria, is now in the British Museum. (2.) A mountain in the land of Moab from which Moses looked for the first and the last time on the Promised Land (Deut. 32:49; 34:1). It has been identified with Jebel Nebah, on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea, near its northern end, and about 5 miles south-west of Heshbon. It was the summit of the ridge of Pisgah (q.v.), which was a part of the range of the "mountains of Abarim." It is about 2,643 feet in height, but from its position it commands a view of Western Israel. Close below it are the plains of Moab, where Balaam, and afterwards Moses, saw the tents of Israel spread along. (3.) A town on the east of Jordan which was taken possession of and rebuilt by the tribe of Reuben (Num. 32:3,38; 1 Chr. 5:8). It was about 8 miles south of Heshbon. (4.) The "children of Nebo" (Ezra 2:29; Neh. 7:33) were of those who returned from Babylon. It was a town in Benjamin, probably the modern Beit Nubah, about 7 miles north- west of Hebron.

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Mount Nebo in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

1. A town of Moab, taken possession of by Reuben. Also the Mount of Moab, from which Moses viewed Canaan (Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1). Pisgah was a ridge of the Abarim mountains, W. from Heshbon. Nebo was a part of Pisgah named from the town, NEBO close by. Isaiah 15:2, "Moab shall howl 'at' (al) Nebo." (Jeremiah 48:1; Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38; Numbers 33:47). As Israel's encampment was "before Nebo," i.e. to the E. of Nebo, probably Nebo was on Pisgah's western slope. The peakless, horizontal straightness of the ridge caused the parts to be distinguished only by the names of adjoining villages. As Nebo "faced Jericho," and "the ravine of Moses' burying place in Moab faced Beth-Peor," Attarus suggested by Seetzen is too far S., and jebel el Jilad too far N. to correspond. Grove suggests jebel Nebbah, S. of wady Hesban. 2. "The other (town) NEBO" was W. of Jordan, in Benjamin (Ezra 2:29; Ezra 10:43; Nehemiah 7:33). Perhaps Beit Nubah.

Link: https://bible-history.com/faussets/N/Nebo+(1)/

Mount Nebo in Hitchcock's Bible Names

that speaks or prophesies

Link: https://bible-history.com/hitchcock/N/Nebo/

Mount Nebo Scripture - Deuteronomy 32:49 -

Get thee up into this mountain Abarim, [unto] mount Nebo, which [is] in the land of Moab, that [is] over against Jericho; and behold the land of Canaan, which I give unto the children of Israel for a possession:

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/32/

Mount Nebo Scripture - Deuteronomy 34:1

And Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, that [is] over against Jericho. And the LORD shewed him all the land of Gilead, unto Dan,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Deuteronomy/34/

Mount of Olives in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

ol'-ivz, (har ha-zethim (Zec 14:4), ma`aleh ha-zethim, "the ascent of the mount of Olives" (2 Sam 15:30, the King James Version "the ascent of (mount) Olivet"); to oros ton elaion, "the Mount of Olives" (Mt 21:1; 24:3; 26:30; Mk 11:1; 13:3; 14:26; Lk 19:37; 22:39; Jn 8:1), to oros to kaloumenon elaion, "the mount that is called Olivet" (Lk 19:29; 21:37; in both references in the King James Version "the mount called (the mount) of Olives"), tou elaionos (Acts 1:12, English Versions of the Bible "Olivet" literally, "olive garden")): 1. Names 2. Situation and Extent 3. Old Testament Associations (1) David's Escape from Absalom (2) The Vision of Ezekiel (3) The Vision of Zechariah 4. High Places 5. Olivet and Jesus 6. View of the City from Olivet 7. Churches and Ecclesiastical Traditions LITERATURE Olivet comes to us through the Vulgate (Jerome's Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) Oliverum, "an oliveyard." 1. Names: Josephus frequently uses the expression "Mount of Olives" (e.g. Ant, VII, ix, 2; XX, viii, 6; BJ, V, ii, 3; xii, 2), but later Jewish writings give the name har ha-mishchah, "Mount of Oil"; this occurs in some manuscripts in 2 Ki 23:13, and the common reading har ha-mashchith, "Mount of Corruption," margin "destruction," may possibly be a deliberate alteration (see below). In later ages the Mount was termed "the mountain of lights," because here there used to be kindled at one time the first beacon light to announce throughout Jewry the appearance of the new moon. To the natives of Israel today it is usually known as Jebel et Tar ("mountain of the elevation," or "tower"), or, less commonly, as Jebel Tur ez zait ("mountain of the elevation of oil"). The name Jebel ez-zaitun ("Mount of Olives") is also well known. Early Arabic writers use the term Tur Zait, "Mount of Oil." 2. Situation and Extent: The mountain ridge which lies East of Jerusalem leaves the central range near the valley of Sha`phat and runs for about 2 miles due South. After culminating in the mountain mass on which lies the "Church of the Ascension," it may be considered as giving off two branches: one lower one, which runs South-Southwest, forming the southern side of the Kidron valley, terminating at the Wady en Nar, and another, higher one, which slopes eastward and terminates a little beyond el-`Azareyeh (modern Bethany). The main ridge is considerably higher than the site of ancient Jerusalem, and still retains a thick cap of the soft chalky limestone, mixed with flint, known variously as Nari and Ka`kuli, which has been entirely denuded over the Jerusalem site (see JERUSALEM, II, 1). The flints were the cause of a large settlement of paleolithic man which occurred in prehistoric times on the northern end of the ridge, while the soft chalky stone breaks down to form a soil valuable for the cultivation of olives and other trees and shrubs. The one drawback to arboriculture upon this ridge is the strong northwest wind which permanently bends most trees toward the Southeast, but affects the sturdy, slow-growing olive less than the quicker-growing pine. The eastern slopes are more sheltered. In respect of wind the Mount of Olives is far more exposed than the site of old Jerusalem. The lofty ridge of Olivet is visible from far, a fact now emphasized by the high Russian tower which can be seen for many scores of miles on the East of the Jordan. The range presents, from such a point of view particularly, a succession of summits. Taking as the northern limit the dip which is crossed by the ancient Anathoth (`anata) road, the most northerly summit is that now crowned by the house and garden of Sir John Gray Hill, 2,690 ft. above sea-level. This is sometimes incorrectly pointed out as Scopus, which lay farther to the Northwest. A second sharp dip in the ridge separates this northern summit from the next, a broad plateau now occupied by the great Kaiserin Augusta Victoria Stiftung and grounds. The road makes a sharp descent into a valley which is traversed from West to...

Link: https://bible-history.com/isbe/O/OLIVES,+MOUNT+OF/

Mount of Olives in Naves Topical Bible

Called MOUNT OF CORRUPTION (R. V. margin, Mount of Olives) 2Ki 23:13 -(East of Jerusalem) -The highway to and from the east passed over it 2Sa 15:30 -Jesus' triumphant entry into Jerusalem by way of Mt 21:1; Mr 11:1; Lu 19:29,37 -Jesus repairs to Mt 24:3; 26:30; Mr 13:3; 14:26; Lu 21:37; 22:39 -Jesus makes his ascension from Ac 1:12

Link: https://bible-history.com/naves/O/OLIVES,+MOUNT+OF/

Mount of Olives in Smiths Bible Dictionary

"The Mount of Olives" occurs in the Old Testament in Zec 14:4 only. In 2Sa 15:30 it is called "Olivet;" in other places simply "the mount," Ne 8:15 "the mount facing Jerusalem" 1Ki 11:7 or "the mountain which is on the east aide of the city." Eze 11:23 In the New Testament the usual form is "the Mount of Olives." It is called also "Olivet." Ac 1:12 This mountain is the well-known eminence on the east of Jerusalem, intimately connected with some of the gravest events of the history of the Old Testament and the New Testament, the scene of the flight of David and the triumphal progress of the Son of David, of the idolatry-of Solomon, and the agony and betrayal of Christ. It is a ridge of rather more than a mile in length, running in general direction north and south, covering the whole eastern side of the city. At its northern end the ridge bends round to the west so as to form an enclosure to the city on that side also. On the north a space of nearly a mile of tolerably level surface intervenes between the walls of the city and the rising ground; on the east the mount is close to the walls, parted only by the narrow ravine of the Kidron. It is this portion which is the real Mount of Olives of the history. In general height it is not very much above-the city: 300 feet higher than the temple mount, hardly more than 100 above the so-called Zion. It is rounded, swelling and regular in form. Proceeding from north to south there occur four independent summits, called -- 1, "Viri Galilaei:" 2, "Mount of Ascension;" 3, "Prophets" --subordinate to the last and almost a part of it; 4, "Mount of Offence." 1. Of these the central one -the "Mount of Ascension"--is the most important. Three paths lead from the valley to the summit-one on the north, in the hollow between the two crests of the hill another over the summit, and a third winding around the southern shoulder still the most frequented and the best. The central hill, which we are now considering, purports to contain the sites of some of the most sacred and impressive events of Christian history. The majority of these sacred spots now command little or no attention; but three still remain, sufficiently sacred--if authentic--to consecrate any place. These are-- (1) Gethsemane, at the foot of the mount; (2) The spot from which our Saviour ascended on the summit; (3) The place of the lamentation of Christ over Jerusalem, halfway up. Of these, Gethsemane is the only one which has any claim to be authentic. [GETHSEMANE] 2. Next to the central summit, on the southern side is a hill remarkable...

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Mount of Olives in Easton's Bible Dictionary

so called from the olive trees with which its sides are clothed, is a mountain ridge on the east of Jerusalem (1 Kings 11:7; Ezek. 11:23; Zech. 14:4), from which it is separated by the valley of Kidron. It is first mentioned in connection with David's flight from Jerusalem through the rebellion of Absalom (2 Sam. 15:30), and is only once again mentioned in the Old Testament, in Zech. 14:4. It is, however, frequently alluded to (1 Kings 11:7; 2 Kings 23:13; Neh. 8:15; Ezek. 11:23). It is frequently mentioned in the New Testament (Matt. 21:1; 26:30, etc.). It now bears the name of Jebel et-Tur, i.e., "Mount of the Summit;" also sometimes called Jebel ez-Zeitun, i.e., "Mount of Olives." It is about 200 feet above the level of the city. The road from Jerusalem to Bethany runs as of old over this mount. It was on this mount that Jesus stood when he wept over Jerusalem. "No name in Scripture," says Dr. Porter, "calls up associations at once so sacred and so pleasing as that of Olivet. The 'mount' is so intimately connected with the private, the devotional life of the Saviour, that we read of it and look at it with feelings of deepest interest and affection. Here he often sat with his disciples, telling them of wondrous events yet to come, of the destruction of the Holy City; of the sufferings, the persecution, and the final triumph of his followers (Matt. 24). Here he gave them the beautiful parables of the ten virgins and the five talents (25); here he was wont to retire on each evening for meditation, and prayer, and rest of body, when weary and harassed by the labours and trials of the day (Luke 21:37); and here he came on the night of his betrayal to utter that wonderful prayer, 'O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt' (Matt. 26:39). And when the cup of God's wrath had been drunk, and death and the grave conquered, he led his disciples out again over Olivet as far as to Bethany, and after a parting blessing ascended to heaven (Luke 24:50, 51; Acts 1:12)." This mount, or rather mountain range, has four summits or peaks: (1) the "Galilee" peak, so called from a tradition that the angels stood here when they spoke to the disciples (Acts 1:11); (2) the "Mount of Ascension," the supposed site of that event, which was, however, somewhere probably nearer Bethany (Luke 24:51, 52); (3) the "Prophets," from the catacombs on its side, called "the prophets' tombs;" and (4) the "Mount of Corruption," so called because of the "high places" erected there by Solomon for the idolatrous worship of his foreign wives (1 Kings 11:7; 2 Kings 23:13; Vulg., "Mount of Offence").

Link: https://bible-history.com/eastons/O/Olves,+Mount+of/

Mount of Olives in Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Har-hazzey-thim. E. of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 11:23), separated from it by "the valley of Jehoshaphat" (Zechariah 14:4). "The mount of the olive grove" (Elaionos), Acts 1:12. Arabic jebel es Zeitun. In 2 Samuel 15:30 "the ascent of the olives" (Hebrew). "The mountain facing Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:7); called "the hill of corruption" from Solomon's high places built to Chemosh and Moloch (2 Kings 23:13-14). The road by which David fled from Absalom across Kedron, and passed through trees to the summit, where was a consecrated spot (an old sanctuary to Elohim, like Bethel) at which he worshipped God (2 Samuel 15:30; 2 Samuel 15:32). Turning the summit he passed Bahurim (2 Samuel 16:5), probably near Bethany, then through a "dry and weary (Hebrew hayeephim) land where no water was," as he says Psalm 63:1; 2 Samuel 16:2; 2 Samuel 16:14 (the same Hebrew), 2 Samuel 17:2. In Psalm 42 he was beyond Jordan; in Psalm 63 he is in the wilderness on the near side of Jordan (2 Samuel 15:28; 2 Samuel 17:21-22). Shimei, scrambling along the overhanging hill, flung down the stones and dust of the rough and parched descent. The range has four hills. Josiah defiled Solomon's idolatrous high places, breaking the "statues," cutting down the groves, and filling their places with men's bones. After the return from Babylon the olive, pine, palm, and myrtle branches for booths at the feast of tabernacles were thence procured (Nehemiah 8:15). The ridge runs N. and S., separating the city which lies on its western side from the wilderness reaching from the eastern side of Olivet to the Dead Sea. At the northern extremity the range bends to the W., leaving a mile of level space between it and the city wall; whereas on the E. the mountain approaches the wall, separated only by a narrow ravine, Kedron, to which the descent from the Golden gate, or the gate of Stephen, is steep, and the ascent from the valley bed up the hill equally so. The northern part, probably Nob, Mizpeh, and Scopus (so called from the view it commands of the city), is distinct historically, though geologically a continuation, from "the Mount of Olives." So too the "mount of evil counsel" on the S. The Latin Christians call the northern part "Viri Galilaei", being the presumed site of the angels' address to the disciples at the ascension, "ye men of Galilee," etc. (Acts 1:11). Olivet (Et Tur), the historical hill so called, separated from Scopus by a depression running across, is a limestone rounded hill, the whole length two miles; the height at the Church of the Ascension on the summit is 2,700 ft. above the Mediterranean, Zion is 2,537 ft. above, Moriah ("temple area" or Haram) at 2,429 ft., the N.W. corner of the city at 2,581 ft. Thus it is considerably...

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Luke 19:29

And it came to pass, when he was come nigh to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount called [the mount] of Olives, he sent two of his disciples,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/19/

Mount of Olives Scripture - Luke 21:37

And in the day time he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out, and abode in the mount that is called [the mount] of Olives.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/21/

Mount of Olives Scripture - Luke 19:37

And when he was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen;

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/19/

Mount of Olives Scripture - Mark 13:3

And as he sat upon the mount of Olives over against the temple, Peter and James and John and Andrew asked him privately,

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Mark/13/

Mount of Olives Scripture - Matthew 21:1

And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples,

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Matthew 24:3

And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what [shall be] the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Mark 11:1

And when they came nigh to Jerusalem, unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount of Olives, he sendeth forth two of his disciples,

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Matthew 26:30

And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Mark 14:26

And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Luke 22:39

And he came out, and went, as he was wont, to the mount of Olives; and his disciples also followed him.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Luke/22/

Mount of Olives Scripture - John 8:1

Jesus went unto the mount of Olives.

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Mount of Olives Scripture - Zechariah 14:4

And his feet shall stand in that day upon the mount of Olives, which [is] before Jerusalem on the east, and the mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof toward the east and toward the west, [and there shall be] a very great valley; and half of the mountain shall remove toward the north, and half of it toward the south.

Link: https://bible-history.com/studybible/Zechariah/14/

Mount Sinai in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE

si'-ni, si'-na-i (cinay; Codex Alexandrinus Sina, Codex Vaticanus Seina): 1. The Name: The name comes probably from a root meaning "to shine," which occurs in Syriac, and which in Babylonian is found in the name sinu for "the moon." The old explanation, "clayey," is inappropriate to any place in the Sinaitic desert, though it might apply to Sin (Ezek 30:15,16) or Pelusium; even there, however, the applicability is doubtful. The desert of Sin (Ex 16:1; 17:1; Nu 33:11 f) lay between Sinai and the Gulf of Suez, and may have been named from the "glare" of its white chalk. But at Sinai "the glory of Yahweh was like devouring fire on the top of the mount in the eyes of the children of Israel" (Ex 24:17); and, indeed, the glory of the Lord still dyes the crags of Jebel Musa (the "mountain of Moses") with fiery red, reflected from its red granite and pink gneiss rocks, long after the shadows have fallen on the plain beneath. Sinai is mentioned, as a desert and a mountain, in 35 passages of the Old Testament. In 17 passages the same desert and mountain are called "Horeb," or "the waste." This term is chiefly used in Deuteronomy, though Sinai also occurs (Dt 33:2). In the other books of the Pentateuch, Sinai is the usual name, though Horeb also occurs (Ex 3:1; 17:6; 33:6), applying both to the "Mount of God" and to the desert of Rephidim, some 20 miles to the Northwest. 2. Traditional Site: The indications of position, in various passages of the Pentateuch, favor the identification with the traditional site, which has become generally accepted by all those explorers who have carefully considered the subject, though two other theories may need notice. Moses fled to the land of Midian (or "empty land"), which lay East of the Sinaitic peninsula (Nu 22:4,7; 25; 31), and when he wandered with his flocks to Horeb (Ex 3:1) he is said to have reached the west side of the desert. In another note (Dt 1:2) we read that the distance was "eleven days' journey from Horeb by the way of Mount Seir unto Kadesh-barnea" or Petra (see WANDERINGS OF ISRAEL), the distance being about 145 miles, or 14 miles of daily march, though Israel--with its flocks, women and children--made 16 marches between these points. Sinai again is described as being distant from Egypt "three days' journey into the wilderness" (Ex 5:3), the actual route being 117 miles, which Israel accomplished in 10 journeys. But, for Arabs not encumbered with families and herds, this distance could still be covered by an average march of 39 miles daily, on riding camels, or even, if necessary, on foot. 3. Identification with Jebel Musa: These distances will not, however, allow of our placing Sinai farther East than Jebel Musa. Lofty mountains, in all parts of the world, have always been sacred and regarded as the mysterious abode of God; and Josephus says...

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Mount Sinai in Naves Topical Bible

1. A mountain in the peninsula east of the Red Sea Also called SINA-HORA The people of Israel arrive