Sites - Jerusalem

Hasmonean Walls in Wikipedia

With Jewish independence restored in the mid second century BCE, the Hasmoneans quickly launched an effort to populate and fortify the Upper City, the western hill abandoned after the Babylonian sacking of Jerusalem. According to 1 Maccabees 10, 10-11, "Jonathan dwelt in Jerusalem and began to rebuild and restore the city. He directed those wh...

Read More

Solomon's Stables in Wikipedia

Solomon's Stables (Hebrew: אורוות שלמה‎) is the popular name for an underground vaulted space on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Solomon's Stables are located under the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount, 12½ metres below the courtyard and feature twelve rows of pillars and arches. History -- The structure was built by King Herod as part o...

Read More

Cardo Maximus in Wikipedia

The cardo (also cardo maximus) was a north-south oriented street in Roman cities, military camps, and coloniae. The cardo, an integral component of city planning, was lined with shops and vendors, and served as a hub of economic life. Cardo in Roman city planning Most Roman cities also had a Decumanus Maximus, an east-west street that served as...

Read More

Western Wall in Wikipedia

The Western Wall (Hebrew: הכותל המערבי‎, translit.: HaKotel HaMa'aravi), Wailing Wall or Kotel (lit. Wall; Ashkenazic pronunciation: Kosel); and known by Arabs as Ḥā'iṭ Al-Burāq, is located in the Old City of Jerusalem at the foot of the western side of the Temple Mount. It is a remnant of the ancient wall that surrounded the Jewish Temple's cou...

Read More

Western Wall Tunnel in Wikipedia

The Western Wall Tunnel (Hebrew: מנהרת הכותל‎, translit.: Minheret Hakotel) is an underground tunnel exposing the Western Wall in its full length. The tunnel is adjacent to the Western Wall and is located under buildings of the Old City of Jerusalem, Israel. While the open-air portion of the Western Wall is approximately 60 m long, the majority...

Read More

The Cenacle in Wikipedia

The Cenacle (from Latin cenaculum), also known as the "Upper Room", is the term used for the site of The Last Supper. The word is a derivative of the Latin word cena, which means dinner. In Christian tradition, based on Acts 1:13,[1] the "Upper Room" was not only the site of the Last Supper (i.e. the Cenacle), but the usual place where the Apo...

Read More

Tomb of David in Wikipedia

King David's Tomb (Hebrew: קבר דוד המלך‎) is the name given to a Jewish religious site on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, near the Hagia Maria Sion Abbey; the site has traditionally been viewed as the burial place of King David, the second king of Israel. It is situated in a ground floor corner of the remains of the former Hagia Zion, a Byzantine chu...

Read More

Church of the Redeemer in Wikipedia

The Lutheran Church of the Redeemer is the only Protestant church in the Old City of Jerusalem. Built between 1893 and 1898 by the architect Paul Ferdinand Groth (*1859-1955*) following the designs of Friedrich Adler, the Church of the Redeemer currently houses Lutheran congregations that worship in Arabic, German, Danish, and English. The chu...

Read More

Via Dolorosa in Wikipedia

The Via Dolorosa (Latin for Way of Grief or Way of Suffering) is a street, in two parts, within the Old City of Jerusalem, held to be the path that Jesus walked, carrying his cross, on the way to his crucifixion. The current route has been established since the 18th century, replacing various earlier versions.[1] It is today marked by nine Stati...

Read More

Antonia Fortress in Wikipedia

The Antonia Fortress was a military barracks built by Herod the Great in Jerusalem on the site of earlier Ptolemaic and Hasmonean strongholds, named after Herod's patron Mark Antony. The fortress was built at the eastern end of the great wall of the city (the second wall), on the northeastern side of the city, near the temple and Pool of Beth...

Read More

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8