Southern Kingdom Of Judah

Sennacherib Withdrew Miraculously From Israel

Assyria, now ruled by Sennacherib, moved against Jerusalem in 701 B. C. It was at this time that Hezekiah constructed the Siloam Tunnel to bring water from the Spring of Gihon into the city of Jerusalem (2 Chr. 32:30). But then something very strange happened. Somehow, miraculously the Assyrians withdrew from attacking Jerusalem after sufferi...

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Manasseh Judah`s Most Wicked King

Revival came during the reign of Hezekiah but it was immediately swept aside by Manasseh, who was Judah`s most wicked and longest ruling king. The nation never fully recovered from the effects of this evil king. Manasseh`s son Amon continued in his father`s depravity, but he soon was murdered. His successor was Josiah (about 640-609 B.C.)....

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Josiah Killed At Megiddo

Josiah reigned about 640-609 B.C. and he restored traditional covenant religion, which was based on the Book of the Law newly discovered in a Temple storeroom (2 Chr. 34:14). Many did not follow Josiah`s example, however, and the prophet Zephaniah foretold disaster for the nation. By 610 B.C. the Assyrian Empire had collapsed under Babylonian ...

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Babylonians Capture Jerusalem

After Josiah there was no hope for Judah, the last 3 kings were all evil. The Babylonians swept down upon Jerusalem in 597 B. C. and captured it. A second attack led to Jerusalem`s second defeat in 586 B. C. Captives from both campaigns were taken to Babylonia to mark the captivity of the Southern Kingdom....

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Two Tribes Of The Southern Kingdom

The Southern Kingdom consisted of 2 tribes (Judah and Benjamin). The kingdom extended in the north as far as Bethel, while in the south it ended in the dry area known as the Negev. Its eastern and western boundaries were the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. Jerusalem was its capital and it lasted from about 922-586 B.C....

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