Excavations

Centre for Archaeology at Monash University

in Victoria, Australia. Currently excavating in Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt; Dakhleh Oasis lies 800km south-west of Cairo and has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Situated above artesian springs, Dakhleh Oasis forms part of a chain of oases and trade routes that start in the Nile Valley in the north of the country and rejoin the river at modern Luxor, Aswan and in the northern Sudan.

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Tel Hazor (excavations at Hazor)

Hazor was an ancient Canaanite and Israelite city located in the north of modern day Israel. Recent archaeological excavations have revealed how important this city was in antiquity. This site provides information about Tel Hazor and information for prospective volunteers who may wish to participate in further excavations at Hazor. No previous experience in archaeology is required.

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The Single Mission Barges of Caesarea Maritima

Caesarea is located today half way between Tel Aviv and Haifa on Israel's Mediterranean coast. It was here that Herod the Great built the city of Caesarea Maritima with Sebastos, its huge harbour complex. Christopher Brandon [Articles of Interest] [Caesarea] [Archaeology]

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Archaelogical Excavations at Cetamura del Chianti

Information regarding excavations at Cetamura, Italy, occupied during both the Hellentistic period and early Roman Empire. Includes some images from the site. [Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Combined Caesarea Expeditions

Site information regarding current excavations at Caesarea Maritima, Israel. Underwater Excavations of Sebastos: King Herod's Harbor. The ancient harbor at Caesarea, Israel is located on the Mediterranean coast midway between Tel Aviv and Haifa near the Kibbutz Sdot Yam (34 deg 53.5 min E 32 deg 30.5 min N). The harbor was commissioned and built by Herod the Great in 21 BC. Herod used a new Roman building technique which incorporated newly invented material, hydraulic concrete, to build harbor moles out from the coastline. The early history of the harbor is documented by Josephus Flavius, however, the later history is still largely unknown (the harbor is presently submerged 5-7m below mean sea level). Recent excavations have focused on reconstructing the method of harbor construction and the morphology of the harbor in order to understand how the harbor functioned and how it changed through time. [Archaeology] [Excavations]

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UCSD Archaeological Field Schools in the Middle East

Site information from both Nahal Tillah, Israel, and Wadi Fidan, Jordan. [Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Tel Dor Photos and Info

Dig information and photos from excavations at Tel Dor, Israel. Eric Kondratieff's web site is devoted to Tel Dor, an important archaeological site on Israel's Mediterranean coastline. Also known as Tantura or Khirbet el-Burq (its Arabic names), Tel Dor is located fifteen miles south of Haifa, and just eight miles north of Caesarea; the temporary home for dig volunteers is in nearby Pardess Hanna (See map of Israel with locations). [Archaeology] [Excavations]

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University of Southern Florida Expedition at Sepphoris

Information from several seasons of excavation at Sepphoris, Israel, and an extensive discussion of the glass found on site. [Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Caesarea Expeditions

Various areas of excavations including underwater. includes photos and maps. [Articles of Interest] [Caesarea] [Archaeology]

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Tel Dor Harbor Archaeological Expedition

Throughout Biblical times, from the days of Solomon to the reign of Herod the Great, the harbor at Dor acted as a magnet, drawing commerce and conquerors to the Carmel coast. One of the few natural harbors on Israel`s Mediterranean coast, Dor today is one of the country`s largest archaeological sites and an important key to understanding the sequence of occupation during Biblical and later times.

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The AMPHORAS Project

This site contains information on plain, unglazed, ceramic storage containers used to carry wine, oil, fish, and other commodities around the ancient Mediterranean. AMPHORAS is making available part of the archive collected by Virginia R. Grace at the excavations of the Agora at Athens, as well as some additional materials. Included are: "- A bibliography of scholarly work on finding, identifying, and studying Greek and Roman amphoras and the trade they carried "- Passages in ancient Greek literature on the use of amphoras (quoted in English). "- Translations into English of works (or parts of works) published in Russian on amphoras "- Links to other Web sites with amphora information and/or images (excavations, wrecks, etc) and other sources of bibliography "- Searches of the bibliography files and the text of other files.

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The Ancient City of Athens

THE ANCIENT CITY OF ATHENS is a photographic archive of the archaeological and architectural remains of ancient Athens (Greece). It is intended primarily as a resource for students of classical art & archaeology, civilization, languages, and history at Indiana University as a supplement to their class lectures and reading assignments and as a source of images for use in term papers, projects, and presentations. We also hope that this site will be useful to all who have an interest in archaeological exploration and the recovery, interpretation, and preservation of the past.

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Nippur

The history and current excavations of the capital of the Mesopotamian culture, first settled around 6,000 years ago, from the Oriental Institute. [Archaeological Sites] [Iraq]

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List of Current Researchers

Archaeological Sites; University Programs; From About.com

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Sir Austen Henry Layard - Discoveries at Nineveh

Full text of Layard's visit and discoveries, in the 1840's, to Syria, Asia Minor, Babylon and Assyria [Archaeology]

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Focus On Ephesus - A Panoramic Virtual Tour

Ephesus is the best preserved classical city of the Eastern Mediterranean, and among the best places in the world enabling one to genuinely `soak in` the atmosphere of Roman times. [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Tell es-Safi/Gath Archaeological Project

Tel es-Safi/Gath -believed to be the biblical city of "Gath of Philistines", home of Goliath (Bar Ilan University / York University) [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Tel Dor Archaeological Expedition

The Voyage of the Planetâ„- Magazine in collaboration with the University of South Africa (UNISA) Department of Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern Studies is now recruiting volunteers to join the 2008 South African Excavation Team for a season of archaeological excavation at Tel Dor in Israel. [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Archaeological Sites in Israel

Madison Biblical Archaeology Society [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Caesarea Maritima, Israel

(Combined Caesarea Expeditions) -a major seaport commissioned and built by Herod the Great between 22 and 10 B.C. Photos by David Padfield, Church of Christ [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Archaeological Dig List for Israel

Those who say you can`t travel backward through time never worked at an archaeological dig. You can do it and it doesn`t require a fancy degree to join in. Volunteers do most of the dirty work and are often the lucky ones who find the artifacts. Volunteers come from all walks of life: some are students, some are retirees, some are on a religious pilgrimage, some are motivated by the thrill of discovery. Biblical Archaeology Review. [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Holy Land Expeditions

Fun things to do with your kids in Israel. This family oriented travel guide will help you get the most out of your visit. [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Archaeology Image of the Harbor of Ephesus

Lots of info and images of Ephesus, Turkey. According to tradition John brought Mary here after Jesus' crucifixion. Brandon Wason, December 2006. NovumTestamentum.com [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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Ephesus Bibliography

Paul's Ephesus, Turkey. According to Church tradition St. John brought Mary here after Jesus' crucifixion. Brandon Wason, December 2006. NovumTestamentum.com [Biblical Archaeology] [Excavations]

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