En Gedi in Wikipedia

Ein Gedi (Hebrew: עֵין גֶּדִי‎ is an oasis in Israel, located west of the Dead Sea, near Masada and the caves of Qumran. The name En-gedi is composed of two Hebrew words: ein means spring and gdi means goat-kid. En Gedi thus means "Kid spring." History Shulamit Fall at Nahal David [edit]Biblical era In the 2 Chronicles 20:2 it is identified with Hazazon- tamar, where the Moabites and Ammonites gathered in order to fight Josaphat. In Genesis 14:7 Hazazon-tamar is mentioned as being a Amorite city, smitten by Chedorlaomer in his war against the cities of the plain, . In Joshua 15:62 , Ein Gedi is enumerated among the cities of the Tribe of Judah in the desert Betharaba, but Ezekiel 47:10 shows that it was also a fisherman's town. Later, King David hides in the desert of En Gedi (1 Samuel 24:1-2 ) and King Saul seeks him "even upon the most craggy rocks, which are accessible only to wild goats" (1 Samuel 24:3 ). The Song of Songs (Song_of_Songs 1:14 ) speaks of the "vineyards of En Gedi"; the words, "I was exalted like a palm tree in Cades" (’en aígialoîs), which occur in Ecclesiasticus 24:18, may perhaps be understood of the palm trees of Ein Gedi. The indigenous Jewish town of Ein Gedi was an important source of balsam for the Greco-Roman world until its destruction by Byzantine emperor Justinian as part of his persecution of the Jews in his realm. A synagogue mosaic remains from Ein Gedi's heyday, including a Judeo-Aramaic inscription warning inhabitants against "revealing the town's secret" – possibly the methods for extraction and preparation of the much-prized balsam resin, though not stated outright in the inscription – to the outside world...

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